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Businesses sign up 400,000 dementia friends

30 March 2014 10:02:28 UK headlines

Easyjet and Butlins among businesses signing up 400,000 "dementia friends"        

Vice All News Time30 March 2014 10:02:28


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Businesses sign up 400,000 dementia friends

30 March 2014 08:57:31 Politics News - UK Politics

Easyjet and Butlins among businesses signing up 400,000 "dementia friends"        

Vice Politics Time30 March 2014 08:57:31


Peter Marinello: I was once the next George Best but lost it all and ended up stranded in Butlins

29 March 2014 02:16:30 Football | Mail Online

JOHN MCGARRY: In a career that embraced, among others, Hibs, Arsenal, Portsmouth, Motherwell, Fulham, Pheonix Inferno, Hearts and Partick Thistle, Marinello didn’t quite knock the original Bestie from his hedonistic throne but he sure had a lot of fun trying.

Vice Football Time29 March 2014 02:16:30


Peter Marinello: I was once the next George Best but lost it all and ended up stranded in Butlins

29 March 2014 02:08:18 Sport | Mail Online

JOHN MCGARRY: In a career that embraced, among others, Hibs, Arsenal, Portsmouth, Motherwell, Fulham, Pheonix Inferno, Hearts and Partick Thistle, Marinello didn’t quite knock the original Bestie from his hedonistic throne but he sure had a lot of fun trying.

Vice Sport Time29 March 2014 02:08:18


Butlins advertises job role for BABY as a toddler test dummy for the famous holiday resort

24 January 2014 13:14:50 mirror - News

The lucky tot will be in charge of judging the bounciness of beds right through to how cuddly the characters are

Vice All News Time24 January 2014 13:14:50


Of course the young should take menial jobs. Working in the bingo hall at Butlin's set me on the road to success, says Deborah Meaden

23 January 2014 03:47:30 News | Mail Online

If I’ve learned anything during my career, it’s that if you sit at home doing nothing, then absolutely nothing is exactly what will happen , writes Deborah Meaden.

Vice All News Time23 January 2014 03:47:30


Anthony Joshua beat Paul Butlin with second-round technical knockout

26 October 2013 23:42:32 Sport | Mail Online

Olympic super-heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua continued his professional apprenticeship with a destructive second-round stoppage win over journeyman Paul Butlin.

Vice Sport Time26 October 2013 23:42:32


Kell Brook v Vyacheslav Senchenko and Anthony Joshua v Paul Butlin LIVE ¿ round-by-round coverage of the IBF welterweight title eliminator

26 October 2013 22:50:54 Sport | Mail Online

Kell Brook can finally get that elusive shot at the IBF welterweight title by defeating Vyacheslav Senchenko, the man who cruelly ended Ricky Hatton's career.

Vice Sport Time26 October 2013 22:50:54


Anthony Joshua is mad to fight me says Paul Butlin

25 October 2013 02:42:34 Sport | Mail Online

Anthony Joshua's second professional opponent believes he is 'mad' to have chosen to fight him so early in his career. Veteran heavyweight Paul Butlin has only won 14 of his 33 bouts.

Vice Sport Time25 October 2013 02:42:34


The Osmonds, still big in Bognor: As Donny and Marie sell out Las Vegas, the others wow the women at Butlins

05 October 2013 03:44:13 News | Mail Online

Merrill, 60, Jimmy, 50 and Jay Osmond, 58, played two lunchtime shows at Butlin's in Bognor Regis while their siblings Donny and Marie played in Vegas.

Vice All News Time05 October 2013 03:44:13


Woman 'bites another woman's nose off during panto at Butlins holiday camp'

13 August 2013 18:44:48 mirror - News

Tina Love, 27, has been charged with grievous bodily harm following the alleged incident during a performance of Jack And The Beanstalk at the Bognor Regis holiday camp

Vice All News Time13 August 2013 18:44:48


Woman charged after allegedly biting off another woman's nose at Butlins holiday park

13 August 2013 18:23:51 mirror - News

Tina Love, 27, charged with grievous bodily harm after allegedly biting off a woman's nose at Butlins in Bognor Regis

Vice All News Time13 August 2013 18:23:51


Premier League 2012-13 review: flop of the season | Paul Doyle

20 May 2013 11:17:53 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

From QPR's consistent goofing to the decline of Cheik Tioté, here are our nominations. Now submit yours • Have your say in the other categories too Welcome to guardian.co.uk's review of the 2012-13 Premier League season. Now that the campaign has ended we would like you to help us choose your favourite goal, the best signing and the best manager, as well as eight other categories. We have nominated some contenders, but this is just to get the discussion going: we would like your suggestions so that we can compile the best into final polls that you can vote on. The polls will be published at midday on Tuesday 21 May, so please tell us what you think. Thanks Queens Park Rangers In fairness, they were so lavishly bad that they became quite entertaining. Who could fail to be amused by their relentlessly inventive self-destruction, from misguided signings and tactics to slapstick own goals and majestically needless red cards? The owners goofed, both managers goofed and most of the players goofed. Impressive uniformity for a club riven by rifts. Cheik Tioté There were many reasons for Newcastle's stuttering campaign, some of them excusable. But while injuries and fixture congestion took a toll, some players just plain flunked their season. Cheik Tioté's regression from one of the signings of last season to nigh-on a liability this term was strange. Whereas last season he helped Newcastle establish a sturdy platform in midfield, this season his positive influence declined alarmingly and he was noticeable only for the consistency with which he mistimed tackles. Tony Pulis This season Stoke were supposed to make a great leap forward. Or was that last season? Pulis has been promising for a while that he would add a new dimension to his team's play, adding a little more unpredictability to their admirable ruggedness. But you get the feeling that he never really meant it or just couldn't bring himself to loosen up enough to create or attack, especially away, where Stoke were routinely contemptibly negative. To have a greater net spend on transfers than anyone other than Chelsea and Manchester City over the past five years and end up with a right flank manned by Andy Wilkinson and Ryan Shotton is to confess to an extraordinarily limited vision. Roberto Mancini There are professors who got PhDs from a slot machine in Butlins who could mount better defences of their title than Manchester City managed this season. So many non-performances, so many ill-conceived tactics and substitutions. And, while we're at it, so little clue in Europe. Adam Johnson Freed from the clutches of the unappreciative Mancini, the winger was supposed to fly to new heights at Sunderland. But he just didn't. He seemed inhibited by the responsibility thrust upon him following his £10m transfer and rather than bring sparkle to the Stadium of Light, he helped spread the gloom that engulfed it for most of the campaign. He may have been even worse than we think, but we just didn't realise it because Sunderland were rarely worth paying attention to. • Please check out the other categories: Pundit of the season Manager of the season Signing of the season Match of the season Player of the season Goal of the season Gripe of the season Premier League Paul Doyle guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time20 May 2013 11:17:53


Premier League 2012-13 review: flop of the season | Paul Doyle

20 May 2013 11:15:49 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

From QPR's consistent goofing to the decline of Cheik Tioté, here are our nominations. Now submit yours • Have your say in the other categories too Welcome to guardian.co.uk's review of the 2012-13 Premier League season. Now that the campaign has ended we would like you to help us choose your favourite goal, the best signing and the best manager, as well as eight other categories. We have nominated some contenders, but this is just to get the discussion going: we would like your suggestions so that we can compile the best into final polls that you can vote on. The polls will be published at midday on Tuesday 21 May, so please tell us what you think. Thanks Queens Park Rangers In fairness, they were so lavishly bad that they became quite entertaining. Who could fail to be amused by their relentlessly inventive self-destruction, from misguided signings and tactics to slapstick own goals and majestically needless red cards? The owners goofed, both managers goofed and most of the players goofed. Impressive uniformity for a club riven by rifts. Cheik Tioté There were many reasons for Newcastle's stuttering campaign, some of them excusable. But while injuries and fixture congestion took a toll, some players just plain flunked their season. Cheik Tioté's regression from one of the signings of last season to nigh-on a liability this term was strange. Whereas last season he helped Newcastle establish a sturdy platform in midfield, this season his positive influence declined alarmingly and he was noticeable only for the consistency with which he mistimed tackles. Tony Pulis This season Stoke were supposed to make a great leap forward. Or was that last season? Pulis has been promising for a while that he would add a new dimension to his team's play, adding a little more unpredictability to their admirable ruggedness. But you get the feeling that he never really meant it or just couldn't bring himself to loosen up enough to create or attack, especially away, where Stoke were routinely contemptibly negative. To have a greater net spend on transfers than anyone other than Chelsea and Manchester City over the past five years and end up with a right flank manned by Andy Wilkinson and Ryan Shotton is to confess to an extraordinarily limited vision. Roberto Mancini There are professors who got PhDs from a slot machine in Butlins who could mount better defences of their title than Manchester City managed this season. So many non-performances, so many ill-conceived tactics and substitutions. And, while we're at it, so little clue in Europe. Adam Johnson Freed from the clutches of the unappreciative Mancini, the winger was supposed to fly to new heights at Sunderland. But he just didn't. He seemed inhibited by the responsibility thrust upon him following his £10m transfer and rather than bring sparkle to the Stadium of Light, he helped spread the gloom that engulfed it for most of the campaign. He may have been even worse than we think, but we just didn't realise it because Sunderland were rarely worth paying attention to. • Please check out the other categories: Pundit of the season Manager of the season Signing of the season Match of the season Player of the season Goal of the season Gripe of the season Premier League Paul Doyle guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time20 May 2013 11:15:49


Dane Bowers pleads not guilty to two charges of assault at Butlins

13 May 2013 23:17:13 mirror - News

The former Another Level singer was the headline act at a 1990s night in Bognor Regis, West Sussex, when the incident occurred

Vice All News Time13 May 2013 23:17:13


Union with Ukip's England? Spare us | Kevin McKenna

12 May 2013 01:18:46 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Nationalists should be making an equitable immigration policy a central policy plank One by one, the few remaining ties that bind us with England are being loosened. For those of us who have cherished our shared heritage with our southern neighbours, the first two weeks in May have been dismal ones. The success of Ukip in the English local elections might have been inevitable, but even so, the procession of grotesques who staggered out of our television screens and into our living rooms the other week made you wrap your coat more tightly about yourself and steal a glance at the clock counting down the days to the referendum on Scottish independence. It seems the English people and their political classes are in thrall to a party that has only two policies: fear of immigrants and loathing for Europe and which is led by a chap who, it seems, has never stopped celebrating winning the Butlins 1983 Arthur Daley lookalike contest. How on earth did proud England ever let it come to this? Not even David Cameron's most fervent supporters would claim that he has ever had a strong grip on the parliamentary Conservatives, but his attempts to appease the Worzel Gummidge faction on his party's right by allowing Ukip to set his agenda on membership of the EU have been abject. And, as the Queen's speech underlined, the spectre of Nigel Farage is also forcing Cameron to squeeze immigrants even further. At this rate, Britain will be herding all of our "bad" immigrants (Bulgarians, Romanians, Albanians and citizens of North African states) into caves and bothies. The BBC's vox pop on the streets of Boston, Lincolnshire, following Ukip's local election surge made you wonder if Scots have a creator in common with these people, let alone values and heritage. "Did you vote for Ukip?" "Yes." "Why?" "Because of all those foreigners taking our jobs." One after another they gathered and let out the despairing howl of beaten and self-pitying people everywhere: we're too lazy and pig ignorant to take jobs that we consider beneath us but we'll blame the aliens anyway. It's easy to dismiss Ukip as one of those passing English curiosities, but watch how well they do in the 2014 European elections and count how many Tory activists vote for them. Instead of criticising the English Tories for politicising the Queen's speech by including a reference to defending the union, Scottish nationalists should be rejoicing and making plans to award Farage the freedom of Scotland. The Ukip leader has handed Scottish nationalists a gilt-edged opportunity to ask their fellow Scots: "Do you really want to be in a union with a country whose citizens are gathering behind this man and his policies in ever-increasing numbers?" Now is the time for the SNP to state unequivocally a fair and just immigration system will be one of the charisms of an independent Scotland. Our current first minister and his predecessor have proclaimed Scotland as a country that is outward-looking and will open its arms to welcome people from other countries, be they economic migrants or those fleeing oppression and torture. Until now, Scottish politicians have been able to proclaim their liberal immigration credentials secure in the knowledge that, as it is a reserved matter, they didn't have to legislate for it. Thus our government has sought exemption (in vain) from the UK's immigration cap and criticised the prohibitive earning requirements for people seeking to live in Scotland. I don't doubt the sincerity of sentiments such as these, but until they are tested they will merely be well-meaning hand-wringing. The SNP now has a game-changing opportunity to move Scotland spiritually, emotionally and ethically away from England by delivering an immigration policy that is as compassionate and open as England's is ugly and spiteful. This should be a cornerstone of its white paper due before the end of the year. Westminster's immigration policy is based on the premise that England is already overcrowded. It is in a state of chaos because successive home secretaries, both Labour and Tory, have pandered to the white-van knuckle-draggers at all times. Ed Miliband accused David Cameron of trying to out-Farage Nigel Farage. Miliband, though, is a wretched and spineless politician. He was part of a Labour government that fundamentally, and unjustly, altered the status of refugees to the UK. In 2005, they announced that those granted refugee status under a UN Convention would receive five years' leave to remain rather than indefinite leave to remain. The confusion sown by this sop to England's swivel-eyed anti-immigrationists as the deadline to reapply approaches is total and utter. There has been very little evidence thus far that the SNP and Yes Together have the balls to trust their instincts on the big questions. They created a new land speed record in distancing themselves from adopting a new Scottish currency and Alasdair Gray's thoughtful essay on the undermining of Scottish culture. At times, they are afraid of their own shadows. In an independent Scotland, we would assume that we will have an enlightened asylum and human rights policy but what will that actually mean in situations that cannot be so neatly packaged? Where will we be on rights for emerging EU states such as Croatia, Serbia and Turkey; family reunion; work permits; entry visas and indefinite or temporary leave to remain. In a fringe speech at last year's SNP conference, Maggie Lennon of the Bridges Programmes told delegates, including Fiona Hyslop, the culture and external affairs minister, to own this policy. "This is an issue that always has the potential to be manipulated by the media and to divide public opinion. To whom will you pander and will you have the stomach for brave policy initiatives?" In the forthcoming referendum, Scots shouldn't be told how much they will get in an independent Scotland; rather, they should be asked how much they are willing to give. I would give a lot to be in a country that had a progressive and enlightened policy on immigration and integration. Scottish independence Immigration and asylum UK Independence party (Ukip) Scotland Local elections Scottish politics Local government Local politics

Vice All News Time12 May 2013 01:18:46


'Sexsomniac' Andrew Machin, 40, is cleared of raping a 21-year-old at Butlins

07 May 2013 12:36:42 News | Mail Online

Andrew Machin, 40, is one of the first men in the UK to be acquitted of a rape charge after raising the defence of sexsomnia during his trial at Lincoln Crown Court.

Vice All News Time07 May 2013 12:36:42


Andrew Machin: 'Sexsomniac' cleared of raping woman while asleep in Butlins chalet

07 May 2013 01:17:17 mirror - News

He admitted waking up in bed with the woman who he had walked home because she was too drunk to stand

Vice All News Time07 May 2013 01:17:17


'Sexsomniac', 40, is cleared of raping a 21-year-old at Butlins because he had 'no control over his actions while asleep'

06 May 2013 14:37:41 News | Mail Online

Andrew Machin, 40, is one of the first men in the UK to be acquitted of a rape charge after raising the defence of sexsomnia during his trial at Lincoln Crown Court.

Vice All News Time06 May 2013 14:37:41


Gwyneth Paltrow: loved, loathed, but never ignored | profile

05 May 2013 01:14:35 Film | theguardian.com

The star of the Iron Man movies, health guru and red-carpet provocateur, provokes wildly differing reactions. Who is she really, this American in London? Last week, the entertainment website Vulture posted a handy six-step guide on how not to hate Gwyneth Paltrow . Paltrow, the 40-year-old, peachy-skinned actress who, in recent years, has attracted more column inches for munching quinoa than for actually appearing in films, is gracing the big screen again in Iron Man 3 , reprising her role as the hero's love interest, Pepper Potts. Reviews suggest her performance – in what is admittedly a limited part – is extremely good. Hence the Vulture guide. "It is normal to dislike Gwyneth Paltrow these days, it's a consensus viewpoint, basically," the writers state. "In the interest of a positive Iron Man 3 experience, Vulture has devised a six-point plan to help you put aside your Gwyneth Paltrow distaste for the length [130 minutes] of the film." Step one is to unsubscribe from Goop , the lifestyle website founded by Paltrow in 2008. Goop, with its baffling mixture of inspiring recipes, travel tips, feelgood workout sessions and wholesome, new age aphorisms, has generated much bile since its inception. It has been slammed for its "Marie Antoinette-esque detachment from reality" and according to one columnist, even the name – cutely derived from Paltrow's initials – "makes you want to rip your face off with your bare hands". It's easy to make fun of her airy online pronouncements from Planet Wealth: recently, Paltrow recommended a French chateau as "a nice family getaway" (price: $15,300 for seven days) and asked a former hotel butler at Claridge's about the best way to clean one's silverware. Then there are the cookbooks. Her most recent, It's All Good , has provoked a furore because it includes recipes for gluten-free sweet potato muffins and chia-seed pudding. Paltrow's recipe for apple sauce comes complete with the admission that she has her own orchard: "We have apple trees at our house in Amagansett, New York, and in October they're bursting with fruit." Yet if you speak to people who know Paltrow, a different side emerges. Friends says she is self-deprecating, with a wry sense of humour and a ready willingness to poke fun at herself. "She's a woman's woman," according to Texas singer Sharleen Spiteri. "She's actually very likable but for some reason it doesn't translate." Last month, she appeared on the Ellen DeGeneres show and gamely threw herself into doing impressions of Jay-Z, Kanye West and her husband, Coldplay frontman Chris Martin (displaying an impressive aptitude for remembering rap lyrics as she did so). When she wore a revealing Antonio Beradi dress with sheer panelling to attend the premiere of Iron Man 3 and was roundly condemned for putting too much flesh on show, she was quick to admit: "I kind of had a disaster … let's just say everyone went scrambling for a razor." In an interview for Glamour magazine, she expressed her love for her adopted home city of London, said she took her children to parks and museums on the tube and confessed that her husband had to explain the concept of Blue Peter to her. Why is there such a disconnect between these two facets of Paltrow's character? Her friends say Paltrow is simply being honest and refuses to pretend to be something she's not. So if she makes a lot of money and has a comfortable life with her rock star husband and their two photogenic children, Apple and Moses, then she's not going to blog about an all-inclusive deal at Butlins or how to maximise points on your Nectar card. By contrast, her critics claim that she simply doesn't know when to stop: it's not enough for Paltrow to be an actress earning millions, she also has to be a cookbook writer, a lifestyle guru and a health freak who claims to possess "the butt of a 22-year-old stripper". "I think Gwyneth probably could've kept this resentment at bay if she hadn't tried to connect with the fans," Eleanor Barkhorn, a senior associate editor at the Atlantic magazine, said recently. "She's trying to maintain the trappings of the A-list lifestyle while at the same time seeming relatable and it's not working." She is a curiously polarising figure: an American in London who appears to have taken over from her friend Madonna as Most Irritating Yankee Emigre in the popular perception. But whereas Madonna's attempts to blend in consisted of wearing Dick Van Dyke flat caps and drinking pints of beer in much-ridiculed paparazzi photographs, Paltrow's unapologetic determination simply to carry on being herself has provoked a barely concealed fury. So perhaps it was inevitable that in the week Paltrow was voted Star magazine's "Most Hated Celebrity" (above even self-confessed woman-beater Chris Brown), she was also crowned People magazine's "Most Beautiful Woman in the World". We can't make up our minds. Paltrow was born in Los Angeles, the city in which she would later make her name and where she would eventually rise to the podium in 1999 to accept the best actress Oscar for Shakespeare in Love . Performing was in her genes: her mother, Blythe Danner, was an acclaimed theatre actress and continues to appear in hit movies including Meet the Parents ; her father, Bruce, was a TV and film producer and director, whose credits included the long-running medical drama, St Elsewhere . As a child, Paltrow became accustomed to her mother's frequent absences owing to work commitments. Her father became the stay-at-home parent, as Danner recalled in an interview last year: "He would walk her all night long. He did everything for her in those early days, it was wonderful … He used to say to me, 'Darling, you go to the Chekhov or the Tennessee Williams plays and I'll do the TV and get the bread on the table.' He was a rare one." Father and daughter continued to be close even when Paltrow dropped out of an anthropology degree at the University of California to pursue an acting career. She made her stage debut in 1990 and then was cast in a number of supporting roles in big Hollywood films – she was the young Wendy in Hook (1991) and played opposite her then-fiance Brad Pitt in David Fincher's hit thriller Seven in 1995. But it was Shakespeare in Love in 1998 that catapulted her into the major league: the New York Times called her performance "breathtaking" and when she wore a pink Ralph Lauren gown to the Academy Awards a year later, she was credited with making the colour fashionable again. A series of stellar roles followed – Sliding Doors ,

Vice All News Time05 May 2013 01:14:35


Grimsby car crash: Pictured - the tragic family killed in a horror smash

14 April 2013 01:55:31 mirror - News

They were on their way to a dance contest at ­Butlins in Skegness, Lincolnshire, at lunchtime on Friday when the accident happened

Vice All News Time14 April 2013 01:55:31


Tributes paid to family of five killed in head-on crash as they made their way to Butlin's dance competition

14 April 2013 01:20:40 News | Mail Online

Bethany Cockburn, 18, and Bethany's 23-month-old daughter Lacie (pictured) were among the five who died in the crash near Grimsby. Lacie’s father, Garry Stephenson (right) who was not in the car had recently returned from a tour of duty in Afghanistan.

Vice All News Time14 April 2013 01:20:40