do you know the name of TV comic who groomed Ben

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Batman Day Quiz: How much do you know about the Caped Crusader?

23 July 2014 15:24:21 mirror - News

This year is Batman's 75th anniversary, and DC Comics have declared today Batman Day- test yourself with our fiendish quiz

Vice All News Time23 July 2014 15:24:21


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Do you know who really runs Wimbledon?

23 June 2014 10:26:31 Sport

Behind the scenes at Wimbledon there's a falconer, a hairdresser and a head ball distributor to keep everything running smoothly. Meet the people who help run Wimbledon.

Vice All News Time23 June 2014 10:26:31


Who is Guy Pelly? All you need to know about Prince William and Prince Harry's close friend

02 May 2014 10:30:51 mirror - News

The royal pair are set to jet off for the nightclub manager's wedding in Memphis, Tennessee, but how much do you know about the groom-to-be?

Vice All News Time02 May 2014 10:30:51


TV comedian accused of grooming teenager who killed himself uses top libel lawyer to explain himself to boy's family

13 April 2014 12:07:13 News | Mail Online

Last night the parents of Ben Cowburn spoke of their dismay at the TV comedian’s use of high-profile libel lawyers Carter-Ruck to make the approach.

Vice All News Time13 April 2014 12:07:13


Revealed: Tragic Ben Cowburn told nurse that TV comic raped as family demand to know why medic was not heard at inquest

30 March 2014 04:18:50 News | Mail Online

The nurse also believes the celebrity, who was not named at the inquest in Truro, Cornwall, plied the 18-year-old with drink and drugs to ensure he gave his 'consent' for sex.

Vice All News Time30 March 2014 04:18:50


Why has comic who 'groomed' overdose boy not been named? MPs criticise decision and say public should be concerned if 'deals are being done behind closed doors'

24 March 2014 03:47:31 News | Mail Online

An inquest has heard the gay comedian ‘took advantage’ of Ben Cowburn (pictured). But under an informal agreement his identity has been protected, and called 'Mr X' at an inquest.

Vice All News Time24 March 2014 03:47:31


TV comic 'groomed' tragic overdose teenager: 18-year-old's mystery death after star 'showered him with gifts then made sexual advances'

23 March 2014 02:44:42 News | Mail Online

Ben Cowburn, a fashion student in London, met the comedian in a pub. He was showered with gifts and taken to drug-fuelled parties by the unnamed star, and later said he felt 'dirty and used'.

Vice All News Time23 March 2014 02:44:42


Formula One 2014: Do you know your cars? Name that engine

13 March 2014 16:50:47 Sport

Interactive quiz: Can you match up the noise with the machine which produces it ahead of a new dawn for Formula One?        

Vice All News Time13 March 2014 16:50:47


Do you know the good fat from bad?

26 October 2013 18:51:36 BBC News - UK

Do you know the good fat from bad?

Vice All News Time26 October 2013 18:51:36


AUDIO: Do you know your neighbours' names?

14 October 2013 16:21:51 BBC News - UK

More than a third of people say they would not be able to pick their neighbours out of a line-up, according to a new poll.

Vice All News Time14 October 2013 16:21:51


Do I know you? Half of us don't know our neighbours' first names

14 October 2013 01:14:36 mirror - News

Worryingly, a third of adults admitted they could pass their neighbour in the street without realising they shared a garden fence

Vice All News Time14 October 2013 01:14:36


Do you know your ministers?

07 October 2013 18:03:03 UK headlines

As David Cameron begins the reshuffle of his ministerial team, we look at some of the current faces in Government. Can you name them all?        

Vice All News Time07 October 2013 18:03:03


Do you know your ministers?

07 October 2013 17:10:48 Politics News - UK Politics

As David Cameron begins the reshuffle of his ministerial team, we look at some of the current faces in Government. Can you name them all?        

Vice Politics Time07 October 2013 17:10:48


Quiz: How much do you know about the royal baby?

23 July 2013 16:36:55 UK headlines

Do you know how much Baby Cambridge weighs? Or how much his dad weighed as a baby? What about the name of the gynaecologist who supervised Baby Cambridge's birth? Take our quiz to find out how much you know about the new prince.        

Vice All News Time23 July 2013 16:36:55


Doctor Who at Comic-Con: 9 things we learned

22 July 2013 15:51:45 Film | theguardian.com

The Daleks will make an appearance in the 50th anniversary special – but what did we learn from the cast and crew? Representatives of the UK's biggest geek export, Doctor Who, were out in force at this year's San Diego Comic-Con. It had its own panel session, featuring Matt Smith, Jenna-Louise Coleman, Steven Moffat, Mark Gatiss and producer Marcus Wilson, and they showed a trailer for the long-awaited 50th celebrations (though it isn't online yet). As is often the way, they said a lot, but revealed very little. Here's what we now know. • At the panel discussion, Moffat admitted that that the special will resolve a lot of long-running storylines. • Let the fangasms begin! In what is surely just one of many riffs on the show's history, the 50th references the first multi-Doctor special, the 10th anniversary episode The Three Doctors. Ten tells Eleven on entering his Tardis: "Oh you've redecorated. I don't like it." – the same words that Two said to Three. • But we may have had our numbering all wrong. The theories about John Hurt playing the "time war Doctor" may be on the money. Since we never saw a regeneration between Paul McGann and Christopher Eccleston, this would be the man who committed genocide against the Daleks and the Timelords. As our current Doctor tells Clara: "I've had many faces. Many lives. I don't admit to all of them. There's one life I've tried very hard to forget." • As those who were lucky enough to see the trailer have revealed, it all sounds a bit ominous: "This fall, the Doctor will face his darkest day: himself." • It looks like we're going to see things getting heavy in the time war itself. • Moffat insisted that the casting for the next Doctor is not yet a done deal. Which would be fine if we were ever able to believe a word he says. • Indeed, as he admitted himself on the panel about the 50th, in response to a question about Captain Jack supposedly not appearing: "I've lied my arse off for months – you know nothing, so don't make presumptions." • The brass pillar in the recreated Tardis set that appears in Gatiss's origins drama An Adventure in Space and Time is the original one. According to Gatiss, the piece is "full of little coincidences like that". • The big news outside the Comic-Con panel was confirmation that the Daleks are coming back for the 50th anniversary. Said Moffat: "The Doctor once said that you can judge a man by the quality of his enemies, so it's fitting that for this very special episode, he should be facing the greatest enemies of all." (A biscuit for anyone who got that reference to Remembrance of the Daleks.) But from the publicity stills we've already seen, the Daleks in question are the ones from the Russell T Davies era. Now, this is either going to mean that we are indeed going to see the terrible events of the time war, or that everyone has acknowledged that the multi-coloured "iDalek" redesign was a terrible mistake and they've been exterminated for ever. Doctor Who Television Fantasy Comic-Con 2013 Festivals Comic-Con Matt Smith Jenna-Louise Coleman Steven Moffat John Hurt Dan Martin guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time22 July 2013 15:51:45


Batman v Superman confirmed at Comic-Con in 'beyond mythological' mash-up

21 July 2013 09:39:12 Film | theguardian.com

Man of Steel and Dark Knight to face-off in Zack Snyder sequel, but word still out on the casting of Batman. Also on the Warner Bros Comic-Con panel: Tom Cruise, Sandra Bullock and Godzilla Holy kryptonite Batman! It's finally happening. The 6,500 fans in Comic-Con's Hall H nearly exploded when Warner Bros announced they were moving ahead on a movie featuring Superman and Batman . Just imagine the clash of egos. Never mind, because after years of impassioned pleas on forums and imploring screeches at previous conventions, the fanboys are getting their wish. Zack Snyder will direct the follow-up to his $630m global hit Man of Steel and will reunite with his Superman, Henry Cavill. Amy Adams, Laurence Fishburne and Diane Lane will also reprise their roles but the big question on everyone's lips is who will play Batman – because it ain't going to be Christian Bale. The British actor has been nothing if not firm in his assertion that he will not don the cape and mask for a fourth time. For now, the mystery will have to linger and fans must make do with the news. They will. Snyder has committed to an early 2014 start and the game plan is to get the movie in theatres for summer 2015. That the two superheroes will be actively battling appeared to be confirmed by Snyder's statement: "Let's face it, it's beyond mythological to have Superman and our new Batman facing off, since they are the greatest superheroes in the world." This thunderous tidbit was actually the last gasp of an epic Warner Bros panel that featured plenty of surprises on Saturday morning. Tom Cruise and his world-beating grin bounded on to the stage in the mega-star's first appearance at the Con. Safe to say, the crowd was suitably excited. Cruise got everyone wound up about the Doug Liman sci-fi Edge Of Tomorrow that is headed to US screens on 6 June 2014. They showed footage of Cruise as a soldier who dies and must relive events over and over until he cracks a way to outwit pesky aliens hell-bent on destroying earth. Sounds like Source Code with much wider collateral damage. Emily Blunt also stars in the movie, which until very recently had gone under the moniker of All you Need is Kill. Prior to the panel the talk was of Gareth Edwards' Godzilla reboot and this part of the show did not disappoint either. Edwards brought teaser footage with him – thankfully a more revealing sequence than what Warner Bros presented last year. The material didn't show too much of the beast himself but there was enough to suggest a beast feast awaits those who turn up on May 16, 2014 both sides of the pond. From the looks of it, Godzilla is lining up for a mighty smackdown with a posse of very nasty looking creatures who once again are rampaging over our planet. Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Bryan Cranston and Elizabeth Olsen were on hand for questions but the only character people seemed keen to learn more about was good old Godzilla. Mexican auteur Alfonso Cuaron was here on Thursday to take part in a Visionaries panel with The Amazing Spider-Man director Marc Webb and Edgar Wright. On that occasion Cuaron spoke more generally about his career but on Saturday he focused on the forthcoming sci-fi thriller Gravity . And what better way to do that than to bring out Sandra Bullock for her debut Hall H experience. The crowd loved Bullock, who stars with George Clooney as astronauts on a fateful mission. Footage showed the pair floating outside their craft on a repair job just as a load of debris hurtles towards them. The film opens this year's Venice film festival at the end of August. The next most exciting event was a teaser from World of Warcraft that showed a man bearing arms against an orc. Moon director Duncan Jones is steeling himself for an early 2014 production start. In other news, Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill have joined the voice cast of The LEGO Movie . Warner Bros Superman Comic-Con Comics and graphic novels Christian Bale Tom Cruise Sandra Bullock George Clooney Venice film festival Bryan Cranston guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time21 July 2013 09:39:12


Ender's Game is making a big push at Comic-Con, but I'm not buying it | Andrew Wheeler

19 July 2013 04:07:43 Film | theguardian.com

As a gay 'nerd', I don't want my money going to benefit homophobic Ender's Game author Orson Scott Card in any way Thousands are gathering in San Diego this week for Comic-Con International , America's biggest celebration of all things nerdy – not just comics, but movies, TV shows, novels video games, board games. If it's sci-fi, fantasy or superhero-based, it's represented somewhere on the convention center's sprawling 2.6m square feet of floor space. Among the properties hoping to make an impact is the sci-fi movie Ender's Game , based on the novel by Orson Scott Card. Distributor Lionsgate Entertainment is making a big push. The stars are in attendance to present clips to the fans, and the movie has a big black hangar-shaped pavilion directly across from the convention centre, unmissable to the guests lining up outside. Ender's Game needs to make a good impression because it has a serious PR problem. Novelist Orson Scott Card is a notorious anti-gay activist who has previously all but called for the overthrow of the American government if gay people are granted the same rights as fellow citizens. He served on the board of a lobbying organisation, the National Organization for Marriage, that wants to redefine marriage as a strictly Christian, strictly procreational institution. Earlier this year Card was announced as the writer for a DC Comics Superman story. The news led to an outcry and calls for a boycott. Chris Sprouse, the artist hired to draw Card's story, backed out , and DC quietly dropped the comic. As I wrote for this site back in February , I planned to boycott the Superman story to keep my money out of Card's pocket. I also said I would not buy a ticket to Ender's Game. Gay nerd activist group Geeks Out is also pushing a boycott . Card has already been paid to have his work adapted for this movie, but if the movie does well, that benefits Card's bank balance in direct and indirect ways. His books will enjoy a bump in sales, and studios will seek other works for adaptation. Any endorsement of Card's work, or of adaptations of his work, swells his coffers and swells his divisive and damaging political causes. Lionsgate sees this connection, and they're worried. They put out a statement last week distancing themselves from the author and outlining their commitment to LGBT issues. They pledged to host a premiere of Ender's Game that would benefit LGBT causes. They also claimed that the views of the National Organization for Marriage were "completely irrelevant to a discussion of Ender's Game", which strikes me as archly disingenuous, but perhaps this giant entertainment conglomerate regards money as a trivial thing? Card himself seems to understand that he has placed his reputation and his continued financial success at stake by standing opposed to progress. He put out a craven and wretched statement of his own this month, in which he managed to say three extraordinary things. First, he said that Ender's Game has nothing to do with political issues "that did not exist when the book was written in 1984". It's extraordinarily narcissistic to imagine that gay people didn't want full equality in the mid-80s. It was still illegal for two consenting adults of the same sex to engage in sexual activity in parts of the US in 1984, so maybe marriage wasn't the top priority. Second, he claimed that his side had lost the fight against marriage equality. The ban on gay marriage in California had been upheld as unconstitutional, and Card anticipates a domino effect across the United States. He's broadly right in his analysis, but his friends at the National Organization for Marriage continue their fight against the inevitable. There was a time Card would throw over the government in defense of his principles. Now he'll throw out his principles for better box office. Third, he asked for tolerance from "the victorious proponents of gay marriage". Tolerance. You will note that he did not rescind his earlier statements. He did not amend or soften his position. He did not apologise for being an active agent in the persecution and inequality of gay people. He did not even say that he would break his ties to the National Organization for Marriage. He certainly did not seek to make amends. He's not sorry. He only wants us to stop talking about it, so that his movie doesn't have to deal with negative press. Heaven knows what he'll say when the movie leaves theatres. And he wants us to show him tolerance. Here is my answer to Orson Scott Card: you have my tolerance. I tolerate your right to get married. I tolerate your right to build a family, just as I would tolerate your decision not to. I tolerate your right to adopt. I tolerate your right to share your financial burdens with your partner. I tolerate your right to visit your partner in hospital. I tolerate your right to marry in a church or out of it. I tolerate your right to have your marriage recognised by the state and by others. I tolerate your freedom. I tolerate your books in libraries. I tolerate your presence in schools. I tolerate your right to hold hands with your partner in a public space. I tolerate your right to be open about who you love without fear of recrimination from neighbours, employers, or churches. I tolerate your religion. So long as you don't seek to impose your views on people who don't share them, I gladly tolerate your right to worship and your right to express your beliefs. I tolerate your existence. Do not assume that my tolerance extends to indulgence. Tolerance doesn't mean that I stand silent while you rail against me. Tolerance does not require me to abandon my own financial power as a consumer. Tolerance does not oblige me to support artists who are unrepentant bigots. When we sought your tolerance, we weren't asking you to buy a ticket to a movie. You have my tolerance, Orson. You have always had my tolerance. Now I'm going to boycott your movie. Tolerate that. Comic-Con Science fiction Comics and graphic novels Superman

Vice All News Time19 July 2013 04:07:43


San Diego Comic-Con: 5 things we're excited for

18 July 2013 04:10:24 Film | theguardian.com

Comic-Con is like Barnum's circus, a splashy wild west dystopian boom town – here are the five panels not to miss It's once again time for Comic-Con, that annual festival which draws geek-minded people by the thousands to the San Diego convention center, where their numbers are matched by an army of entertainment executives and creators peddling their latest wares. "Movies! Get your next hit movies here!," you can hear them shout thunderously from Hall H, as droves of fans rush to get a glimpse of just that. "Two-for-one special on sci-fi TV series. Step right this way." It's like Barnum's circus, a wild west boom town and that strange, splashy dystopia foreseen in Blade Runner, all under one roof. And so, out of the hundreds of panels scheduled to take place between Wednesday's preview night and Sunday's closing events, we have chosen five about which we are most excited. Harrison Ford promoting Ender's Game The film is facing boycotts over Orson Scott Card's well-documented anti-gay views, many of which have been on display in his writing for decades. But this is a major motion picture, starring A-list actors Abigail Breslin, Hailee Steinfeld and Harrison Ford, with the full might of the Hollywood machine behind it. Expect a full-court press as Capital Pictures sets out to convince people they should put aside Card's views and Just Go See The Film Already. Card is excluded from most of the events promoting Ender's Game, including Thursday's Q&A. The real attraction here, then, is Ford, who is notoriously shy of publicity but still a hero to many at the convention who still see him as Han Solo and Indiana Jones. X-Files reunion We're big fans of the the X-Files, and this reunion of its stars, writers and creator marks the show's 20th anniversary. Actors David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson have at times been bashful about embracing the con circuit – after that last film, who can blame them? – but all is largely forgiven now. They'll be joined on stage by Vince Gilligan, one of the best X-Files writers, who has since gone on to bigger and better things, like … Breaking Bad Gilligan's epic television series is drawing down on its final handful of episodes, and fans are dying to know the fate of Walter White, its anti-hero (or is he the villain? WE DON'T KNOW!). The show's final arc premieres in the US on 11 August, but maybe there's a chance the cast will let slip a few hints during their panel on Sunday. Gravity A real, honest-to-god grown-up science-fiction movie. It's been SO LONG. Saturday's Warner Bros/Legendary panel is actually about several things – including Legendary's new Godzilla movie – but one of the highlights will be Alfonso Cuarón's futuristic thriller. Starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, it's the rare piece of art that can and will be featured at both Comic-Con and the Venice Film Festival before it opens in October. Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Remember in The Avengers when Joss Whedon broke everyone's hearts and killed Agent Coulson? Yeah, forget about that. Coulson's alive and well, though no one's really sure how they're going to pull that off. Whedon will be there, possibly offering answers, but more likely not. The point is that it doesn't really matter how it's explained – in comics, no death is really permanent – just that this new TV show is going to feature the return of a beloved character. "Surprise guests reveal top-secret new information" is how they're billing this particular panel on Friday. Comic-Con Harrison Ford San Diego California Comics and graphic novels Television Erin McCann guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time18 July 2013 04:10:24


The Fiver | The power of good grooming and positive presentation

05 June 2013 17:26:20 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Click here to have the Fiver sent to your inbox every weekday at 5pm, or if your usual copy has stopped arriving SUITS YOU, SIR Roberto Martínez is considered an audacious manager so will not balk at the challenge that the Fiver hereby throws down to him: ditch the sharp suits, slick patter and permanent availability to the media – instead, cultivate a straggly beard and earthy hum while wearing denim tracksuits and a scowl. If the Spaniard remains one of the most respected gaffers in the game while following that Gok Wan guide, then the Fiver will truly accept that he deserves the acclaim and his lofty reputation is not just an example of the power of good grooming and positive presentation. As things stand, the Fiver just can't decide if Martinez is a prize pupil or smooth prefect. On one hand, the Fiver admires the fact that Martínez guided Wigan to FA Cup victory over Manchester City, especially as he did so while refusing to take the easy cop-out of resting players for league games. On the other, we know that trophies aren't everything, as David Moyes might say, and we can't help but notice that Wigan were barely out of the bottom three during Martínez's four-year tenure and, of course, they have just been relegated. We know he has nice principles, we're just not fully convinced he knows how to apply them. There's something about the 19,765 defensive blunders that Wigan made during his reign that doesn't feel right. So it seems slightly odd that Martinez has today been confirmed as the new manager of Everton, a year after he allegedly turned down a similar offer from Liverpool in order to stay at Wigan "and take the club to the next level", by which he presumably didn't mean the Championship. "Everton Football Club is today delighted to confirm the appointment of Roberto Martínez as its next manager," read a statement from the club in case the Fiver's word alone wouldn't do. "The 39-year-old Spaniard joins from Wigan Athletic and has signed a four-year contract at Goodison Park," added the statement, just in case anyone thought they had been referring to the 87-year-old Chinese Roberto Martínez, about whom we also have our doubts. QUOTE OF THE DAY "He's making some big mistakes. He has got a lot to learn" – Titus Bramble dishes out a sermon to Sunderland boss Paolo Di Canio. Just let that one percolate for a minute. FIVER LETTERS "For a long time I thought I was Utah's sole Fiver reader until yesterday when I saw this . Is this a second, and clearly more dedicated reader, or the Fiver's long-lost cousin from the Beehive State, Multiple Wife, Caffeine-Free, 0% Alcohol, Vote Mitt Fiver?" – Killian Barrins. "Re: Tom Hillyard writing about Graham Arnold (yesterday's Fiver letters). I am not disagreeing with how grim things must be at Sheffield United but to cast aspersions on the mighty Central Coast Mariners cuts to my core. On the smallest budget of any club in the A-League the Mariners stormed home to be crowned champions playing some very attractive football. I suspect Mr Hillyard might follow those upmarket big spenders known as Sydney FC. Jealously me thinks" – Tony Thompson. " This is how grim things currently are at Sheffield United" – Chris Draper. "In light of the final line of yesterday's Fiver, should Scotland U-21 manager Billy Stark perhaps be advised to avoid Fiver Towers for the foreseeable future? Might Exeter City full-back Steve Tully be advised to stay away too? Winter is coming" – Neil Turner. • Send your letters to the.boss@guardian.co.uk . Also, if you've nothing better to do you can also tweet the Fiver . Today's winner of our prizeless letter o' the day prize is: Killian Barrins. JOIN GUARDIAN SOULMATES We keep trying to point out the utter futility of advertising an online dating service "for interesting people" in the Fiver to the naive folk who run Guardian Soulmates, but they still aren't having any of it. So here you go – sign up here to view profiles of the kind of erudite, sociable and friendly romantics who would never dream of going out with you. BITS AND BOBS Expect needless circulation of that photo now that Millwall have been given permission to speak with St Johnstone boss Steve Lomas over their managerial vacancy. "As with our previous two managers, we will not stand in the way of Steve," declared ambitious Saints chairman Steve Brown. Know-it-all José Mourinho has accused Cristiano Ronaldo of being … a bit of a know-it-all. "I had only one problem with him, very simple, very basic … because maybe he thinks he knows everything and the coach cannot help him to develop," said a pot about a kettle . Sunderland team-mates Phil Bardsley and Stéphane Sessègnon have returned from holiday to find their homes burgled . Northumbria police don't believe the crimes are connected. And Robert Lewandowski hopes his move from Borussia Dortmund is sorted out swiftly. Him and the Fiver both. "I assume that all will now be cleared up and I can join the club of my wish this summer," he cheered. RECOMMENDED VIEWING Greek children, a headfirst free-kick and the unluckiest miss ever: it's the amazing world of football season review: part two . STILL WANT MORE? Marina Hyde explains why José Mourinho's return to England is more booty call than love affair . With Michael Ballack's testimonial on the horizon, was he an arrogant player that was quite good or was he just really, really, really, really good? Marcus Christenson investigates . Keegan appointing Lawro as coach? David Pleat as Marbella's 'football adviser?' Why creating a job out of nothing isn't always the best idea . It's Gallery time, with Louise Taylor giving her rundown of the eight brightest young scamps in the European Under-21 Championships . Gregg Bakowski has defaced some of football's most

Vice All News Time05 June 2013 17:26:20


The Fiver | The power of good grooming and positive presentation

05 June 2013 17:26:19 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

Click here to have the Fiver sent to your inbox every weekday at 5pm, or if your usual copy has stopped arriving SUITS YOU, SIR Roberto Martínez is considered an audacious manager so will not balk at the challenge that the Fiver hereby throws down to him: ditch the sharp suits, slick patter and permanent availability to the media – instead, cultivate a straggly beard and earthy hum while wearing denim tracksuits and a scowl. If the Spaniard remains one of the most respected gaffers in the game while following that Gok Wan guide, then the Fiver will truly accept that he deserves the acclaim and his lofty reputation is not just an example of the power of good grooming and positive presentation. As things stand, the Fiver just can't decide if Martinez is a prize pupil or smooth prefect. On one hand, the Fiver admires the fact that Martínez guided Wigan to FA Cup victory over Manchester City, especially as he did so while refusing to take the easy cop-out of resting players for league games. On the other, we know that trophies aren't everything, as David Moyes might say, and we can't help but notice that Wigan were barely out of the bottom three during Martínez's four-year tenure and, of course, they have just been relegated. We know he has nice principles, we're just not fully convinced he knows how to apply them. There's something about the 19,765 defensive blunders that Wigan made during his reign that doesn't feel right. So it seems slightly odd that Martinez has today been confirmed as the new manager of Everton, a year after he allegedly turned down a similar offer from Liverpool in order to stay at Wigan "and take the club to the next level", by which he presumably didn't mean the Championship. "Everton Football Club is today delighted to confirm the appointment of Roberto Martínez as its next manager," read a statement from the club in case the Fiver's word alone wouldn't do. "The 39-year-old Spaniard joins from Wigan Athletic and has signed a four-year contract at Goodison Park," added the statement, just in case anyone thought they had been referring to the 87-year-old Chinese Roberto Martínez, about whom we also have our doubts. QUOTE OF THE DAY "He's making some big mistakes. He has got a lot to learn" – Titus Bramble dishes out a sermon to Sunderland boss Paolo Di Canio. Just let that one percolate for a minute. FIVER LETTERS "For a long time I thought I was Utah's sole Fiver reader until yesterday when I saw this . Is this a second, and clearly more dedicated reader, or the Fiver's long-lost cousin from the Beehive State, Multiple Wife, Caffeine-Free, 0% Alcohol, Vote Mitt Fiver?" – Killian Barrins. "Re: Tom Hillyard writing about Graham Arnold (yesterday's Fiver letters). I am not disagreeing with how grim things must be at Sheffield United but to cast aspersions on the mighty Central Coast Mariners cuts to my core. On the smallest budget of any club in the A-League the Mariners stormed home to be crowned champions playing some very attractive football. I suspect Mr Hillyard might follow those upmarket big spenders known as Sydney FC. Jealously me thinks" – Tony Thompson. " This is how grim things currently are at Sheffield United" – Chris Draper. "In light of the final line of yesterday's Fiver, should Scotland U-21 manager Billy Stark perhaps be advised to avoid Fiver Towers for the foreseeable future? Might Exeter City full-back Steve Tully be advised to stay away too? Winter is coming" – Neil Turner. • Send your letters to the.boss@guardian.co.uk . Also, if you've nothing better to do you can also tweet the Fiver . Today's winner of our prizeless letter o' the day prize is: Killian Barrins. JOIN GUARDIAN SOULMATES We keep trying to point out the utter futility of advertising an online dating service "for interesting people" in the Fiver to the naive folk who run Guardian Soulmates, but they still aren't having any of it. So here you go – sign up here to view profiles of the kind of erudite, sociable and friendly romantics who would never dream of going out with you. BITS AND BOBS Expect needless circulation of that photo now that Millwall have been given permission to speak with St Johnstone boss Steve Lomas over their managerial vacancy. "As with our previous two managers, we will not stand in the way of Steve," declared ambitious Saints chairman Steve Brown. Know-it-all José Mourinho has accused Cristiano Ronaldo of being … a bit of a know-it-all. "I had only one problem with him, very simple, very basic … because maybe he thinks he knows everything and the coach cannot help him to develop," said a pot about a kettle . Sunderland team-mates Phil Bardsley and Stéphane Sessègnon have returned from holiday to find their homes burgled . Northumbria police don't believe the crimes are connected. And Robert Lewandowski hopes his move from Borussia Dortmund is sorted out swiftly. Him and the Fiver both. "I assume that all will now be cleared up and I can join the club of my wish this summer," he cheered. RECOMMENDED VIEWING Greek children, a headfirst free-kick and the unluckiest miss ever: it's the amazing world of football season review: part two . STILL WANT MORE? Marina Hyde explains why José Mourinho's return to England is more booty call than love affair . With Michael Ballack's testimonial on the horizon, was he an arrogant player that was quite good or was he just really, really, really, really good? Marcus Christenson investigates . Keegan appointing Lawro as coach? David Pleat as Marbella's 'football adviser?' Why creating a job out of nothing isn't always the best idea . It's Gallery time, with Louise Taylor giving her rundown of the eight brightest young scamps in the European Under-21 Championships . Gregg Bakowski has defaced some of football's most

Vice All News Time05 June 2013 17:26:19


Joss Whedon: 'I kept telling my mum reading comics would pay off'

02 June 2013 14:14:32 Film | theguardian.com

Joss Whedon found a cult following when he created Buffy the Vampire Slayer. But now he's directing Hollywood's biggest superhero movies – and Shakespeare. Emma John meets the fanboy who has turned his obsessions into box-office glory Joss Whedon is standing in the Forbidden Planet comics store in London, surveying a row of plastic action figures. There are Gandalfs and Frodos, Batmen and Ironmen. Whedon points out the few female characters – pert young warrior princesses – all standing in the same pose: shoulders back, cleavage thrust forward. This, he explains, is the reason he resisted a Buffy doll. Until last year, Whedon was a writer and director best known for his TV creations. Buffy The Vampire Slayer and its spin-off, Angel , were cult classics, the just-home-from-school fantasy shows that made vampires sexy long before R-Patz and Kristen mooned at each other in Twilight . Then Marvel handed him the biggest toy set they had: Avengers Assemble , a film that trapped their greatest superheroes in one megalithic, extortionately expensive movie. Thor!… Hulk!… Captain America!… Robert Downey Jr! It came with a price tag of no less than $220m; Whedon turned it into the third highest-grossing movie of all time. "I kept telling my mom that reading comic books would pay off," he deadpans. Whedon makes a pilgrimage to Forbidden Planet whenever he comes to London. He might be the Hollywood director responsible for the most successful film of 2012 – he may have a house in Beverly Hills, and Scarlett Johansson on speed-dial – but the creator of Buffy is still very much a fanboy. Like JJ Abrams , who now controls the parallel universes of Star Trek and Star Wars , Whedon is proof that the geek can inherit the earth. In fact, before Avengers came along, Whedon was worried that the zeitgeist had overtaken him. "When Sam Raimi made Spider-Man , I was like – gah, I wanted to be the guy who got it right! When I saw The Dark Knight I was like, Oh, now it's postmodern … They're doing the superhero Godfather ! So I guess it's over and I didn't get to make one…" For a certain type of entertainment fan – for example, me – Whedon's arrival in the mainstream (last year also brought The Cabin in the Woods – a clever meta-horror flick) is particularly satisfying. Even if you don't care for vampires and werewolves, he can make you laugh. If you enjoyed Toy Story , chances are you were laughing at the brilliant repartee he wrote for it; if you followed the US election on Twitter, you probably saw his home-made ad , endorsing Romney as the only candidate who could bring about the zombie apocalypse. But Whedon's genius is never going to be the kind recognised by the "serious" awards – at last year's Oscars, Seth MacFarlane told the audience, "The Avengers was the most popular movie of the year… which is why it was only nominated once." Whedon shrugs off the snub. "If you make a movie where you're just trying to delight people, and you want them to come out overjoyed, then… you're fucked." So meeting him is the ultimate geekout. He has a russet beard, a dress-down look, and kind-dad eyes, and is every bit as genial and funny as his on-screen creations. When we meet up in the morning he is making himself coffee in his hotel room. "I have an obligation to do press, but I don't have an obligation to stay out dancing until 3am," he says, guiltily. Tom Lenk , one of the actors who works with him regularly, has told me that they share a passion for disco, although I can't quite picture Whedon throwing shapes. But then I also can't imagine him facing down an intimidating and costly constellation of stars (including Samuel L Jackson and Gwyneth Paltrow) and their egos. "I had one bad week where some people lost confidence in me," he admits. "But I told them to shut up and got on with my work." While his Avengers sequel begins the colossal task of assembling itself – it is not scheduled to reach cinemas until 2015 – Whedon's new directing project, Much Ado About Nothing , seems like the most contrary project he could have conjured: a black-and-white chamberpiece, shot in 12 days entirely in Whedon's own house. And yet, as the play for which Shakespeare reserved his pithiest dialogue, it is also utterly appropriate for a man who has spent a career crafting zinging one-liners. Whedon nods in agreement. "Somebody came up to me and said, this must be so different from the Avengers ! And I said it's really not. Except that I'm happier because I'm at home surrounded by my loved ones…" Whedon's Much Ado had its genesis in the Shakespeare readings he began hosting at his home over a decade ago. While shooting Buffy , James Marsters – well-known to fans as the dastardly vampire Spike – had mentioned how filming had started to feel like rep theatre, and Whedon, who as a child had read out plays with his family during the holiday season, was inspired to invite his actors to his house to tackle everything from A Midsummer Night's Dream to Hamlet . Then he had children. "They put a stop to everything," he says. "'You like playing music? Oh, I like to yell …'" Meanwhile Whedon's wife Kai, an architect, had built them a home in Beverly Hills with artistic endeavour firmly in mind (she even incorporated an outdoor amphitheatre). The idea of shooting Much Ado there took hold – it is the only Shakespeare play set on a single estate – and when his Avengers contract demanded an enforced week-long break between filming and editing, Kai told him: "It's time." As well as shooting in their own house, they funded the production themselves. "I did everything they say don't do," Whedon grins. "Great idea to shoot next to a golf course, by the way. You know what they do on golf courses all day? Mow." His cast consisted of regulars from his TV shows, who gave their time "for what will ultimately be dozens of dollars". The result is a truly intimate, ensemble Much Ado – one in which every character has his own triumph and tragedy, rather than revolving, as so many productions do, around the bickering flirtation of Benedick and Beatrice. "If you've ever engaged in an endeavour that made you feel you were doing something right

Vice All News Time02 June 2013 14:14:32


How well do you know your aerial shots?

29 May 2013 16:14:20 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

Test your knowledge of identifying the grounds in our 10-question quiz of photos taken from the skies Gregg Bakowski        

Vice All News Time29 May 2013 16:14:20


Alexander Armstrong hits back at 'tribal aversion' to posh comics

14 May 2013 17:50:22 Film | theguardian.com

Armstrong and Miller comic lambasts 'inverse snobbery' while Ricky Gervais teaches guitar – and who's the hottest comedian? This week's comedy news We begin with the Telegraph's tale of Alexander Armstrong and the apparent victimisation of "posh" comics . "Why should your background be held against you?," asks the descendant of William the Conqueror, alumnus of a Durham public school and director of a production company called Toff Media . "It is so short-sighted … This tribal aversion to anyone with a posh voice is very boring." Armstrong – best known as one half of the sketch double-act Armstrong and Miller – even lodges the improbable complaint that his privileged upbringing has been detrimental to his career in British entertainment. In the piece, he blames inverse snobbery for the BBC initially spurning Armstrong and Miller after their big break on the Edinburgh fringe in the mid-1990s. And, he adds, "I'm not anticipating an offer to appear in Shameless ". After reviving his best-loved character for this spring's Comic Relief, Ricky Gervais has now announced a new project for his The Office alter ego, David Brent . The ex- Wernham Hogg manager will appear in a series of YouTube videos dubbed Learn Guitar with David Brent . The videos will feature original Brent compositions, including those – such as Spaceman Came Down – featured in the BBC sitcom. Across the online series, there will be "an album's worth of new songs" broadcast, raising the possibility of an album release in the future. "Working with YouTube," Gervais says, "is a fantastic opportunity for new content to be made available without the limitations of schedules and international restrictions". BBC Films has announced the first movie version of the channel's children's comedy hit Horrible Histories. Entitled Bill, the script by Laurence Rickard and Ben Willbond traces the career of William Shakespeare and promises "murderous kings, spies, lost loves, and a plot to blow up Queen Elizabeth". The TV show's leading cast members will all feature. Also in the news this week, the new Harry Hill feature film , which started shooting last weekend. Matt Lucas and Julie Walters co-star. "Sick hamsters, a fraught road trip, and a King Kong -esque climax atop Blackpool Tower " are promised. Elsewhere, musical comic Rainer Hersch has branded the New Zealand International Comedy festival a "disgrace" after ticketing difficulties and low sales for his run. On TV, a second series – and a transfer to Channel 4 – for sketch duo Cardinal Burns , and a first series for Matt Berry's pilot Toast of London , about an eccentric actor. A former showrunner on The Simpsons , Josh Weinstein is hatching a new animated sitcom for UK audiences – and a debut comedy album is being released featuring material by Andy Kaufman , 29 years after his death. Oh, and the Daily Mail has unearthed the nation's "secret funny-man crushes" – the top three of which include infatuations for Philip Schofield and, er, Boris Johnson … Best of the Guardian and the Observer's comedy coverage · "In leads Jan Francis and Paul Nicholas, it has something age cannot wither: chemistry" – Phelim O'Neill remembers the irresistible 1980s sitcom Just Good Friends . · "I am definitely suited to [ventriloquism]. I took it and ran with it quite hungrily" – The Observer interviews voice-thrower extraordinaire Nina Conti . · A first Edinburgh Fringe run in 15 years for David Baddiel – and a few other big names ( Bo Burnham among them). · "Maybe [the internet has] unlocked a part of people that in the past they were taught to hide" – snark-mining comic Adam Buxton interviewed in the Observer. · "You could quite easily let all 10 hours of it wash over you tomorrow without troubling yourself with a single thought" – Stuart Heritage on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond , now to be remade with Lee Mack and

Vice All News Time14 May 2013 17:50:22


How well do you know your banknotes?

29 April 2013 16:28:47 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

Day-in, day-out you deal with them - hand them over shop counters, retrieve them from the washing machine, marvel at getting crisp new ones from the hole in the wall - but how well do you really know your banknotes? Can you name the historical figures that grace them and their values?        

Vice Finance Time29 April 2013 16:28:47


Chris Columbus: My dad said, 'Don't do a job you hate'

27 April 2013 00:09:30 Film | theguardian.com

Director Chris Columbus is king of the family film and now he's written a children's novel. Elaine Lipworth meets him The new children's book House of Secrets was written by a first-time novelist but there are already predictions that it will be a runaway bestseller. The author, Chris Columbus, has had a firm finger on the pulse of pre-teens ever since Macaulay Culkin was left home alone to defend the house from bumbling burglars. Best known as a film-maker, Columbus directed that 1990 comedy as well as other blockbusters including Mrs Doubtfire and the first two Harry Potter films. He is the undisputed king of family films. The director's literary debut is an adventure about a family who move into a spooky house once owned by a mysterious pulp-fiction author. The parents go missing and the children find themselves trapped inside a dangerous imaginary world. Written with a co-author, Ned Vizzini, the book started life as a screenplay and was shelved for years by Columbus, who decided it would be too expensive to produce: "I re-read it and it hit me that it would be a good idea for a novel." JK Rowling describes House of Secrets as a "break-neck, jam-packed, rollercoaster of an adventure". The story – about the adventures of Eleanor and Brendan Walker (named after two of Columbus's four children), and their sister, Cordelia – is an engrossing page-turner and the writers have been commissioned to deliver a trilogy. "Jo [Rowling] loved it," says Columbus, who sent his friend an early manuscript. "Why would I not go to her? She wrote me a long email and said: 'It is too fast-paced. You've got to slow down, deepen the characters, work on the complexity.' We took her advice to heart. "I've raised four children so I have amassed 20 years of dinner conversations, fights, kids snapping at each other and the intense love they have for each other. I am just writing based on my own experience as a father." We are meeting at the filmmaker's aptly named 1492 Pictures in San Francisco, although it turns out that the director was not named after the explorer Christopher Columbus. His father, Alex, the son of Italian immigrants, named him "Chris not Christopher, because of a long-lost wish by his father to have a Chris in the family." (Columbus's grandmother had refused to inflict the name on any of her 12 children.) The director has made the best of it. "Most people think I've changed it to Chris and I say to them, 'Are you insane?'" Decidedly un-Hollywood, Columbus and his wife of 30 years, Monica, a former dancer, have raised their family in northern California rather than Los Angeles. "I've always maintained a distance from Hollywood," he says. "It's intoxicating and it's fun, but when I'm there I always feel like I'm crashing the party. I feel I'm getting sucked into that world." Columbus bounds into the room to greet me with the same energy as his dog, an affectionate Pomeranian called Gizmo (named after the creature in the 1984 film Gremlins, for which he wrote the screenplay). Wearing black-framed glasses, dressed in a purple polo shirt and jeans, the director exudes youthful exuberance. Is life for the Columbus kids – as I imagine – constantly entertaining? "Well, maybe I was the most fun dad in the universe during the golden years of Harry Potter, when we were living in England, because they were all young," he says. "Then they became teenagers and now I am like a functioning idiot, as every parent is. They want their own space and you have to say no, so you're not fun. My youngest daughter, Isabella, is 16 so she's having a lot of kids over to the house and we can't leave. I have to keep an eye on all of them, I don't want kegs rolling down the driveway." Columbus grew up poor and says he and his wife have taken care not to spoil their children. "My wife brought up all four kids. We've never taken a trip alone away because we wanted to be there for them. You see so many Hollywood kids being raised by nannies, and a lot of them are miserable." On a white board behind the desk is a complicated-looking production schedule listing various projects at different stages of development including Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, which is out this summer. (He directed the original 2009 Percy Jackson film.) His cluttered desk is covered with DVDs, books and family photos. Brendan, 20, and Violet, 19, are both at New York University, where Columbus also studied. His eldest daughter, Eleanor, 24, a recent NYU film school graduate, is working for him in a new company set up to foster young filmmakers. There were no concerns about employing his daughter – on the contrary. "It's not a vanity position. She is essentially running the new company with me because her taste in material is so good. She convinced me to read Harry Potter all those years ago, so I read the books in one weekend. I called my agent, and he said: 'Well, get in line, there are 25 directors ahead of you!'" Columbus was responsible for casting Harry Potter, including the three central stars – Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint. He says he learned a sobering lesson about child actors from his experience with the notoriously troubled Culkin clan, making Home Alone. "I was much younger and I was really too naive to think about the family environment as well. We didn't know that much about the family at the beginning; as we were shooting, we learned a little more. The stories are hair-raising. I was casting a kid who truly had a troubled family life. With Potter, I realised that you have to cast the family as well." None of his own children, incidentally, lean towards acting, although Eleanor played Susan Bones in Harry Potter and has appeared in several other films. In hindsight, would he have cast another actor to play Kevin in Home Alone? Columbus leans forward and shakes his head. "I have no idea. But Macaulay is a very talented guy. I saw him on the London stage in 2001 in Madame Melville and I think he has the opportunity to put his life back on track. It's not too late for him." Any advice for Culkin, now 32? "He should take a lesson from Daniel Radcliffe, who has got away from the partying side and devoted his life to doing good, solid work. That's what's healthy about being in England and not being in Los Angeles," he says. "Actually I think Dan is going to be the new Ron Howard," he says, referring to the Oscar-winning director and former Happy Days child star. I think Dan will be directing great films someday and he's someone that every child actor should look up to. He should have a self-help seminar for young actors." Columbus, an only child, was born in Spangler, Pennsylvania. His father was a coal miner, his mother, Irene, worked in a factory. When he was three the family moved to Ohio "for the promise of a better life" when Alex Columbus got a job in an aluminium factory. "You're above ground so you don't have the promise of black lung or the mines caving in so that really was a step up. My father always said, 'Don't ever do a job that you hate,' which meant that he hated his job. "I grew up with very little but the only things I cared about were books, comics and movies, which were relatively cheap entertainmen

Vice All News Time27 April 2013 00:09:30


Reese Witherspoon, Rihanna and George Osborne: do you know who they are?

23 April 2013 22:07:10 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Actor Reese Witherspoon asked her arresting officer: 'Do you know my name?' It's a classic celebrity ploy to get out of trouble – but it doesn't always work When Reese Witherspoon found herself and her husband Jim Toth arrested in Atlanta on Friday (her for disorderly conduct and him for drink driving), she made sure the news would get out. Stopped by police officers, she reportedly threatened them: "You're about to find out who I am." When they continued to do their job, she followed this up, according to TMZ, with an even more hubristic: "Do you know my name?" Cue much scorn on Twitter, and comparisons between Witherspoon and Tracy Flick, the ruthlessly ambitious schoolgirl she played in Election . Witherspoon has since released a statement saying she is "deeply embarrassed" by her behaviour. It's not hard to see why. Her reply puts her in the company of a host of great and good and not so good who have wielded that line of attack-slash-defence – only to wish they hadn't. In October last year, George Osborne was found to be travelling in a first-class carriage with a standard-class ticket. Accounts of his response to the ticket inspector vary but some witnesses told the Times that Osborne asked, aghast: "Do you know who I am?" The inspector reportedly replied: "I do, but you still need a ticket." Osborne paid the difference between the two fares. This riposte is not limited to one subset of the famous. The music industry has seen its fair share of do-you-know-who-I-am-ing. Last summer, Rihanna , who had been enjoying an evening of dancing on tables and smashing glasses before staff asked her to leave, responded to the bouncers at the Rose club in London with a question of her own. "Do they know who I am?" she hollered to her friends. This is a rare example of the phrase actually working. According to the Daily Mail, she was returned to her table and given lots of free drinks. Back in 2007 David Hasselhoff dropped his "Do you know who I am?" on the bouncers of Wimbledon's Players' Bar after his aggressive, drunken behaviour got him barred. Unlike Rihanna, he was not allowed to remain, and received no freebies. In 1998, Liam Gallagher added patronising insult to his "Do you know who I am?" when he tacked on the word "love" in pursuit of an Australian woman while on tour. Not always completely egotistical, though never modest, Jerry Seinfeld resorted to do-you-know-who-I-am-ing Larry King in 2007 when the chatshow host asked him whether he or the network had cancelled his sitcom. For Salvador Dalí , "Do you know who I am?" was a favourite pickup line – he would bellow out an explosive "I am Dalí!" when his query met with blank faces. Sometimes, it is clear, a celebrity fears that the answer to their question could be a bruising "No". Perhaps for this reason, in 1987 Mike Tyson answered his own "Do you know who I am?" aimed at the philosopher AJ Ayer after he had intervened in a dispute between Tyson and Naomi Campbell . "I'm the heavyweight champion of the world!" Tyson steamed. Ayer replied: "And I am the former Wykeham professor of logic. We are both pre-eminent in our field." Counterintuitively, it is a reply that could work for ticket inspectors and bouncers too. Celebrity Reese Witherspoon George Osborne Mike Tyson Rihanna David Hasselhoff Liam Gallagher Salvador Dalí Jerry Seinfeld guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time23 April 2013 22:07:10


Twitter launches 140-character festival as Ofcom probes Comic Relief sketch

23 April 2013 22:04:51 Film | theguardian.com

Big names will take part in venture with Comedy Central, BBC sketch had over 2,000 complaints, plus Ian McKellen's sitcom This week's comedy news Can't get to Edinburgh? Kilkenny just that bit too far away? Never fear. The cable channel Comedy Central is teaming up with Twitter to launch the first 140-character comedy festival . The festival will commence on 29 April and run for five days, featuring a host of comedy names tweeting jokes and posting six second videos using Twitter's new video app Vine . Next Monday, Twitter will stream the only live #ComedyFest event, a panel discussion featuring Mel Brooks and Judd Apatow. The New York Times has more on the story , including the lowdown on a new app Comedy Central is developing to help users discover their favourite new comedians. Back in the world of real festivals, veteran Anglo-American standup Rich Hall has won the Barry award at the Melbourne comedy festival, as reported by the Guardian's Matt Trueman. Lee Nelson, geezer alter ego of comic Simon Brodkin, announced his candidacy for the vacant parliamentary seat of South Shields, then hours later – having satisfied his hunger for publicity – withdrew . Police are asking for assistance in tracing a fraudster who has repeatedly posed as comedian Peter Kay's brother . Peter Stead's most recent scam involved taking money for non-existent charity gigs. And the character comic Marcel Lucont (real name Alexis Dubus), is auctioning tickets to his 2013 Edinburgh fringe show, Chortle reports . Lucky winners will be invited to select the time and venue of his performance, and choose from a menu of available material. In the bigger league, this week brings news that Israeli PM Binyamin Netanyahu has become a funnyman, with a comical turn on the country's leading satirical TV show. Ali G, aka Sacha Baron Cohen, has been named for the first time on the Sunday Times' soul-sapping Rich List. The Borat star is, it says , "worth" £68m. And sozzled Irish standup Dylan Moran has announced his first north American tour . Finally, in telly matters, the Comic Relief sketch featuring Rowan Atkinson as the Archbishop of Canterbury is to be investigated by the regulator Ofcom, after the BBC received more than 2,000 complaints. Sitcom fans can celebrate the good news that sketch troupe Pappy's are edging ever closer to our screens – and, perhaps, the nation's hearts – as per a Metro report on the upcoming Badults , while Carla (Bread) Lane is threatening to write her first new sitcom for 17 years . Ian McKellen has been discussing his new comedy show about an ageing gay couple (co-starring Derek Jacobi). Vicious, says McKellen, will be "fairly traditional [like] The Golden Girls or I Love Lucy … In the past, gay characters in sitcoms have been figures of fun. They were funny because they were gay. But I like the fact that these characters are funny because of the people they are. That's a real advance." Oh, and the US sitcom Friends isn't – you hear me, isn't – coming back... Best of the Guardian's comedy coverage • "This cinema hasn't had the biggest take-up audience-wise." – Can standup work in cinemas? I check out the movie Comedy Store: Raw and Uncut . • "To be a comedian in the US without a podcast is increasingly to be an oddity" – Diane Shipley on Marc Maron and the boom in (particularly American) comedy podcasts . • "I want to make it quite clear to you both I refuse to have a bomb in my trousers" – from the archive, Jimmy Perry remembers Dad's Army star Arthur Lowe . • "I feel there's an obligation to make [comedy] that bit more interesting …" Bill Bailey interviewed by Simon Hattenstone in Weekend magazine. • It's been asked before and it'll be asked again: have panel shows had their day? Rhik Samadder reviews the genre , and it's most prominent examples. Controversy of the week The big news story of last week was the Boston bombings – and where news goes, comedy is sure to stampede after. Or beforehand, in the case of US animated sitcom Family Guy, which found itself accused of plotting the bombings . Clips of a recent episode of the show, Turban Cowboy, were edited together and posted online to depict parallels with the Boston marathon attack. The Fox network subsequently pulled the episode from its website, and the show's creator Seth MacFarlane tweeted a statement : "The edited Family Guy clip currently circulating is abhorrent. The event was a crime and a tragedy, and my thoughts are with the victims." No space left on the moral high ground for standup Paul Mooney, who was

Vice All News Time23 April 2013 22:04:51


Reese Witherspoon, Rihanna and George Osborne: do you know who they are?

23 April 2013 22:04:51 Film | theguardian.com

Actor Reese Witherspoon asked her arresting officer: 'Do you know my name?' It's a classic celebrity ploy to get out of trouble – but it doesn't always work When Reese Witherspoon found herself and her husband Jim Toth arrested in Atlanta on Friday (her for disorderly conduct and him for drink driving), she made sure the news would get out. Stopped by police officers, she reportedly threatened them: "You're about to find out who I am." When they continued to do their job, she followed this up, according to TMZ, with an even more hubristic: "Do you know my name?" Cue much scorn on Twitter, and comparisons between Witherspoon and Tracy Flick, the ruthlessly ambitious schoolgirl she played in Election . Witherspoon has since released a statement saying she is "deeply embarrassed" by her behaviour. It's not hard to see why. Her reply puts her in the company of a host of great and good and not so good who have wielded that line of attack-slash-defence – only to wish they hadn't. In October last year, George Osborne was found to be travelling in a first-class carriage with a standard-class ticket. Accounts of his response to the ticket inspector vary but some witnesses told the Times that Osborne asked, aghast: "Do you know who I am?" The inspector reportedly replied: "I do, but you still need a ticket." Osborne paid the difference between the two fares. This riposte is not limited to one subset of the famous. The music industry has seen its fair share of do-you-know-who-I-am-ing. Last summer, Rihanna , who had been enjoying an evening of dancing on tables and smashing glasses before staff asked her to leave, responded to the bouncers at the Rose club in London with a question of her own. "Do they know who I am?" she hollered to her friends. This is a rare example of the phrase actually working. According to the Daily Mail, she was returned to her table and given lots of free drinks. Back in 2007 David Hasselhoff dropped his "Do you know who I am?" on the bouncers of Wimbledon's Players' Bar after his aggressive, drunken behaviour got him barred. Unlike Rihanna, he was not allowed to remain, and received no freebies. In 1998, Liam Gallagher added patronising insult to his "Do you know who I am?" when he tacked on the word "love" in pursuit of an Australian woman while on tour. Not always completely egotistical, though never modest, Jerry Seinfeld resorted to do-you-know-who-I-am-ing Larry King in 2007 when the chatshow host asked him whether he or the network had cancelled his sitcom. For Salvador Dalí , "Do you know who I am?" was a favourite pickup line – he would bellow out an explosive "I am Dalí!" when his query met with blank faces. Sometimes, it is clear, a celebrity fears that the answer to their question could be a bruising "No". Perhaps for this reason, in 1987 Mike Tyson answered his own "Do you know who I am?" aimed at the philosopher AJ Ayer after he had intervened in a dispute between Tyson and Naomi Campbell . "I'm the heavyweight champion of the world!" Tyson steamed. Ayer replied: "And I am the former Wykeham professor of logic. We are both pre-eminent in our field." Counterintuitively, it is a reply that could work for ticket inspectors and bouncers too. Celebrity Reese Witherspoon George Osborne Mike Tyson Rihanna David Hasselhoff Liam Gallagher Salvador Dalí Jerry Seinfeld guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time23 April 2013 22:04:51


Reese Witherspoon, Rihanna and George Osborne: do you know who they are?

23 April 2013 22:03:56 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Actor Reese Witherspoon asked her arresting officer: 'Do you know my name?' It's a classic celebrity ploy to get out of trouble – but it doesn't always work When Reese Witherspoon found herself and her husband Jim Toth arrested in Atlanta on Friday (her for disorderly conduct and him for drink driving), she made sure the news would get out. Stopped by police officers, she reportedly threatened them: "You're about to find out who I am." When they continued to do their job, she followed this up, according to TMZ, with an even more hubristic: "Do you know my name?" Cue much scorn on Twitter, and comparisons between Witherspoon and Tracy Flick, the ruthlessly ambitious schoolgirl she played in Election . Witherspoon has since released a statement saying she is "deeply embarrassed" by her behaviour. It's not hard to see why. Her reply puts her in the company of a host of great and good and not so good who have wielded that line of attack-slash-defence – only to wish they hadn't. In October last year, George Osborne was found to be travelling in a first-class carriage with a standard-class ticket. Accounts of his response to the ticket inspector vary but some witnesses told the Times that Osborne asked, aghast: "Do you know who I am?" The inspector reportedly replied: "I do, but you still need a ticket." Osborne paid the difference between the two fares. This riposte is not limited to one subset of the famous. The music industry has seen its fair share of do-you-know-who-I-am-ing. Last summer, Rihanna , who had been enjoying an evening of dancing on tables and smashing glasses before staff asked her to leave, responded to the bouncers at the Rose club in London with a question of her own. "Do they know who I am?" she hollered to her friends. This is a rare example of the phrase actually working. According to the Daily Mail, she was returned to her table and given lots of free drinks. Back in 2007 David Hasselhoff dropped his "Do you know who I am?" on the bouncers of Wimbledon's Players' Bar after his aggressive, drunken behaviour got him barred. Unlike Rihanna, he was not allowed to remain, and received no freebies. In 1998, Liam Gallagher added patronising insult to his "Do you know who I am?" when he tacked on the word "love" in pursuit of an Australian woman while on tour. Not always completely egotistical, though never modest, Jerry Seinfeld resorted to do-you-know-who-I-am-ing Larry King in 2007 when the chatshow host asked him whether he or the network had cancelled his sitcom. For Salvador Dalí , "Do you know who I am?" was a favourite pickup line – he would bellow out an explosive "I am Dalí!" when his query met with blank faces. Sometimes, it is clear, a celebrity fears that the answer to their question could be a bruising "No". Perhaps for this reason, in 1987 Mike Tyson answered his own "Do you know who I am?" aimed at the philosopher AJ Ayer after he had intervened in a dispute between Tyson and Naomi Campbell . "I'm the heavyweight champion of the world!" Tyson steamed. Ayer replied: "And I am the former Wykeham professor of logic. We are both pre-eminent in our field." Counterintuitively, it is a reply that could work for ticket inspectors and bouncers too. Celebrity Reese Witherspoon George Osborne Mike Tyson Rihanna David Hasselhoff Liam Gallagher Salvador Dalí Jerry Seinfeld guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time23 April 2013 22:03:56


Comic character stands for parliament in David Miliband's old seat

21 April 2013 21:20:44 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Who is this Lee Nelson who is representing the Well Good Party in South Shields? Age: Unknown. Appearance: Baseball-capped, loudmouthed London geezer. What about him? He is standing for parliament in the upcoming byelection in South Shields, David Miliband's old seat. Labour, Tory or other? Decidedly other. He is representing Lee Nelson's Well Good Party. Ah, a single-issue crank. What are his policies? He wants to scrap the euro, ban traffic wardens and make all education voluntary. Are you sure he's not a Tory? He also wants half the cabinet to consist of people who left school at 16, and promises to decriminalise crime. Is this bloke for real? No. Oh. Isn't he? No, he's a comic "chav" character played by Simon Brodkin, from a series called Lee Nelson's Well Good Show. Never seen it. It ran for two series on BBC3. That would explain it. How was it received? A reviewer for this newspaper described it as "almost the exact scientific opposite of well good". I try to keep up with the latest developments in election reform, but just remind me: is it now possible for fictional characters to run for parliament? Probably not, but Nelson has apparently filed his nomination papers and plans to make a speech on the steps of South Shields town hall. Why would he do that? He's in the middle of a standup tour, and has a new show – Lee Nelson's Well Funny People – running on BBC3. So it's just a publicity stunt? Or possibly part of the show itself. Another character from the series, footballer Jason Bent, was arrested in March for sneaking onto the pitch at Goodison Park to train with Liverpool players before a match. Is it now possible to charge fictional characters with crimes? No, on this occasion it was Brodkin, 36, who received a six-month conditional caution. Tell me something about Brodkin that will make me like him a little bit. He's a qualified doctor who gave up medicine for comedy. Do say: "If it gets young people interested in politics, this stunt's painful unfunniness will have been worth it." Don't say: "First, do no harm." Byelections David Miliband Comedy Television Comedy guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time21 April 2013 21:20:44