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Santander fined £12.4m by regulator

26 March 2014 10:42:49 BBC News - UK

High Street bank Santander is fined nearly £12.4m by the UK financial watchdog over failures in investment advice.

Vice All News Time26 March 2014 10:42:49


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Santander UK faces £12.5m FCA fine

26 March 2014 01:11:15 Financials

The fine will be the largest paid by Santander UK – and a big blow to the bank given it has focused on attempting to improve its reputation for customer service

Vice Finance Time26 March 2014 01:11:15


Santander UK faces £12.5m FCA fine

26 March 2014 00:21:22 UK Homepage

The fine will be the largest paid by Santander UK – and a big blow to the bank given it has focused on attempting to improve its reputation for customer service

Vice All News Time26 March 2014 00:21:22


Recovery boosts profits at Santander

30 January 2014 10:26:29 UK Homepage

Spanish lender Santander reports a 90% rise in net profits after the Spanish bank, helped by a sharp drop in provisions for non-performing loans

Vice All News Time30 January 2014 10:26:29


Recovery boosts profits at Santander

30 January 2014 09:45:40 Financials

Spanish lender Santander reports a 90% rise in net profits after the Spanish bank, helped by a sharp drop in provisions for non-performing loans

Vice Finance Time30 January 2014 09:45:40


Santander buys €470m stake in China bank

10 December 2013 23:50:29 Financials

Santander to take 8 per cent stake in Shanghai bank, which has total assets of €98bn, and agrees with Chinese lender to send staff to work in China

Vice Finance Time10 December 2013 23:50:29


Santander has led the way in spin-offs

09 December 2013 01:10:12 Financials

Over the past four years, Santander has listed swaths of its far-flung banking empire on local stock markets, helping to bolster the group’s capital

Vice Finance Time09 December 2013 01:10:12


Rory McIlroy describes Caroline Wozniacki as 'my girl'

21 October 2013 11:00:30 UK headlines

Rory McIlroy has hinted that he and Caroline Wozniacki are back together after describing her as "my girl".        

Vice All News Time21 October 2013 11:00:30


Rory McIlroy describes Caroline Wozniacki as 'my girl'

21 October 2013 10:38:22 Sport

Rory McIlroy has hinted that he and Caroline Wozniacki are still together despite rumours of a split after describing her as "my girl".        

Vice Sport Time21 October 2013 10:38:22


Golf's Rory McIlroy dumps tennis golden girl as form dips

13 October 2013 21:15:13 UK headlines

For the last two years golfing superstar, Rory McIlroy, and tennis golden girl, Caroline Wozniacki, have been the toast of the glittering sports' circuit but now after distinct dip in McIlroy's form, it has been reported that he has ended the relationship in the hope of getting back on course and retaining his former World Number One status.        

Vice All News Time13 October 2013 21:15:13


Golf's Rory McIlroy dumps tennis golden girl as form dips

13 October 2013 21:04:39 Sport

For the last two years golfing superstar, Rory McIlroy, and tennis golden girl, Caroline Wozniacki, have been the toast of the glittering sports' circuit but now after distinct dip in McIlroy's form, it has been reported that he has ended the relationship in the hope of getting back on course and retaining his former World Number One status.        

Vice Sport Time13 October 2013 21:04:39


Santander Brazil to pay $2.7bn dividend

27 September 2013 15:58:39 UK Homepage

Santander will reinvest its share of the payout in subordinated debt issued by its Brazilian subsidiary as it seeks to boost the unit’s profitability

Vice All News Time27 September 2013 15:58:39


Santander Brazil to pay $2.7bn dividend

27 September 2013 15:13:13 Financials

Santander will reinvest its share of the payout in subordinated debt issued by its Brazilian subsidiary as it seeks to boost the unit’s profitability

Vice Finance Time27 September 2013 15:13:13


Four charged over Santander 'plot'

14 September 2013 02:57:58 BBC News - UK

Four men are charged over an alleged plot to take control of a Santander bank's computer to steal from the firm.

Vice All News Time14 September 2013 02:57:58


Jessica Ennis-Hill out of World Championships, in bad year for Santander stars Rory McIlroy and Jenson Button

31 July 2013 16:22:12 Sport

Video: Rory McIlroy, Jenson Button and now Jessica Ennis-Hill have endured difficult years since starring in a series of terrible adverts for Santander.        

Vice Sport Time31 July 2013 16:22:12


Rory McIlroy looks to overcome run of poor form by playing more golf

20 July 2013 23:13:04 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Having failed to make the cut at the Open, Rory McIlroy will play as much as possible to try to improve his form When Rory McIlroy offered such extraordinary terminology as "brain dead" and "unconscious" to describe his emotions on the course, the natural inference was that this was a player who needs time away from the game. In fact, McIlroy's approach is the opposite of that. Legitimately, he traces his toils in 2013 partly to not playing enough competitive events in the early part of the year. Game time was essential after McIlroy's switch to new Nike equipment, with the 24-year-old perfectly open about the fact he made an error in opting for a light schedule in advance of the Open Championship. Now McIlroy has a chance to redress that balance. The world No2 will next appear in Akron at the WGC Bridgestone Invitational, a tournament which has the added benefit to the struggling McIlroy of having no halfway cut. "I'm really looking forward to Akron," McIlroy said. "It's a place where I have done well before. It's a place I feel I can win. So going there, I will be really excited to just play four rounds of golf. "It's a great place to practise, as well. It has great facilities and you couldn't ask for better preparation for the defence of the PGA the week later." From there, McIlroy, who missed the Muirfield cut on Friday after posting a "sloppy" 12 over par, heads to Oak Hill to defend the major he won in such emphatic style at Kiawah Island last year. He is then scheduled to play in the FedEx Cup play-off events: the Barclays, Deutsche Bank Championship, the BMW Championship and, qualification depending, the play-off finale of the Tour Championship in Atlanta. That run ends on 22 September. As things stand, the young Northern Irishman's year will end with two tournaments plus an exhibition match against Tiger Woods in China, added to another defence, of his DP World Tour Championship in Dubai. Rory McIlroy The Open 2013 The Open Golf Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time20 July 2013 23:13:04


Santander to axe 'packaged' accounts

18 July 2013 04:10:37 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

Santander plans to completely scrap its "packaged deals" - moving thousands of customers off its paid-for current accounts.        

Vice Finance Time18 July 2013 04:10:37


Rory McIlroy faces lack of Open preparation after Irish Open failure

29 June 2013 18:12:23 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Woods and Rose have also withdrawn from tournaments • Paul Casey signs for a third-round 67 at the Irish Open There can be no such thing as textbook preparation for a major championship. That much was again proven at this month's US Open. After travelling through the night Phil Mickelson arrived at the Merion Golf Club with little time to spare on Thursday morning after spending the earlier part of the week at home in San Diego. He went on to finish second to Justin Rose, who had appeared in Pennsylvania on the Tuesday afternoon. Even though poor weather had played a part in both of those matters and both players had spent crucial time on the course the week before, the approach of Mickelson and Rose cannot be described as routine. This may offer a glimmer of hope to Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods, Lee Westwood and Rose as the Open Championship appears on the horizon. In isolation McIlroy's missed cut at the Irish Open may not have overly troubled him. Speaking of a feeling of "suffocation" when playing at or close to home McIlroy highlighted the difficulty when he is so close to adulation and expectation. He feels a natural obligation to play in the Irish Open but it is perfectly easy to infer he does not particularly enjoy it. That said it was to McIlroy's credit that he returned here on Saturday to practise and sign autographs for what is an adoring public. The problem is that two over aggregate at the tournament was not isolated. It leaves McIlroy with no competitive play before he arrives at Muirfield. The East Lothian venue, moreover, is a completely new one to McIlroy. The world No2 can take solace from being in decent company, in what represents a curious Open preamble. Woods withdrew from this weekend's AT&T National event at Congressional – which he won last year – because of the elbow injury that was apparent at Merion. Rose pulled out of the AT&T citing an "extremely demanding mentally and physically" spell. That explanation was understandable given the reaction to his major win when he appeared on television chat shows in the United States and his involvement the following week at the Travellers Championship. Were Rose's season to finish tomorrow, he could reflect on a stunning and life-changing achievement. Rose will not play in the French Open and neither will Westwood, who cited fatigue when removing himself from the field at Le National. Graeme McDowell at least had the opportunity to bounce back from missing the Irish Open cut by appearing in France, where he will have Ian Poulter and Luke Donald for company. From there all roads lead to Muirfield with the diminishing value of the Scottish Open, be played at Castle Stuart the week before the third major of the year, highlighted by a noticeably weak field. Mickelson, who will play competitively the week before a major if at all feasible, is the most high-profile competitor by a considerable margin. It has been a logical criticism of McIlroy after his tribulations of 2013 that he has not entered enough tournaments. Linked to that is his continual assertion that his play on the driving range is strong and the time required to adapt to his new Nike equipment. McIlroy belatedly added the Texas Valero Open to his schedule to prepare for the Masters; the likelihood that he would have done likewise with France was deemed impossible by sponsor commitments and a family wedding. "I guess it has been a light schedule but from the Open onwards I'm playing seven tournaments in nine weeks or 10 weeks, so that will be a busy stretch coming up," McIlroy said. "I'll finish with a couple at the end of the year, so I've still got a lot of golf left to play. "It has been a light schedule for the first six months of the year and I'll look at that going into next year and see if I will do anything differently." One man who hopes the Irish Open will hand him a path to the Open Championship is Paul Casey, who hinted once again that he is returning to something even approaching his best form. The Englishman signed for a third-round 67, which leaves him on an aggregate of nine under and holding a legitimate chance of his first tournament victory in two years. "I am really excited," Casey said. "That was a wonderful round. The key has been putting; when I make putts I am going to shoot good rounds because the ball striking is there." Golf Rory McIlroy Paul Casey Phil Mickelson Justin Rose The Open Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time29 June 2013 18:12:23


Rory McIlroy: I must block out suffocating fans at Irish Open

27 June 2013 02:42:47 Sport | Mail Online

This is Rory McIlroy's first event since the US Open 10 days ago, when he added to his rap sheet this year with a spot of club-bending and throwing.

Vice Sport Time27 June 2013 02:42:47


Paul McGinley defends Rory McIlroy's inconsistent form

25 June 2013 23:59:08 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• The pair prepare to compete at the Irish Open • McGinley: 'I think it's in his DNA to be up and down' Paul McGinley, Europe's Ryder Cup captain, has said Rory McIlroy's "up and down" form should be no reason for concern. McIlroy's inauspicious start to 2013 continued with a disappointing tie for 41st in the US Open this month. He is yet to win this year, has been headed as the world No1 by Tiger Woods and shown signs of frustration following his lucrative switch to Nike clubs. Yet as he and McIlroy prepare to compete in front of home crowds at the Irish Open, McGinley has defended the double major winner's inconsistency. "My opinion on Rory six months ago is the same opinion I have now," McGinley said. "I don't think Rory is ever going to be a flat-line golfer. I think it's in his DNA to be up and down. "If you look at him this time last year, the same questions were coming; why has Rory gone off form, he missed three or four cuts in a row, he's this and that. Then all of a sudden after a few weeks off he wins the US PGA Championship and he played fantastically well. "He is never going to be a Nick Faldo who is going to flat line. We just have to accept that and let him get on with it. He will come through the bit of a trough that he has had; he'll come through and have success again. I don't see Rory as a flat-line player and I just think that's going to be part of his career for the rest of his life. "Everybody is different and one of the reasons why he is so exciting is the fact that he is up and down. That's one of the reasons why Seve was so exciting, he was up and down, too. I think that's the X factor that Rory has. He can win every week." Padraig Harrington said: "Rory is only ever one golf shot away from playing great." McGinley also believes Justin Rose's US Open victory, his first major success, offers a boost to those looking to make up the European Ryder Cup team at Gleneagles next year. Rose was the first English player in 43 years to claim the US Open. "If you look at things historically and not just for European players, when someone breaks through and wins often their peers step up to the plate after that," McGinley added. "So I would not be surprised to see a number of English players, particularly, stepping up now and performing at the Open Championship and USPGA. I think it can only be a good thing because people will think : 'If Justin can do it, I can do it.' So I am looking forward to the reaction of the European players who think Justin has broken the mould, let's go and follow him." The Royal and Ancient has dismissed a report that the Open Championship will return to Royal Portrush in 2018 or 2019. The Northern Ireland venue remains under consideration but concerns over logistics and infrastructure mean another Irish Open, possibly in 2015, is likely to be held before a decision is made regarding the third major of the season. Portrush hosted the Irish Open last year. "The R&A continues to examine the possibility of the Open returning to Royal Portrush. However, reports that The Open is to return there later this decade are without foundation," a spokesman said. At present Open venues up to and including Royal Troon in 2016 have been confirmed. Rory McIlroy Paul McGinley Justin Rose Golf Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time25 June 2013 23:59:08


US Open champion Justin Rose hailed by Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell

17 June 2013 09:53:54 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• McIlroy and McDowell lead tributes to Merion hero • 'I feel like I did Ben Hogan justice,' says Rose Former champions Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell have led the tributes to Justin Rose after he followed in their footsteps by winning his first major title in the US Open. Rose carded a closing 70 to finish one over par at Merion and condemn Phil Mickelson to his sixth runners-up finish in the event on his 43rd birthday, the left-hander finishing two shots behind alongside Australian Jason Day. Tony Jacklin was the last Englishman to win the US Open in 1970 – 10 years before Rose was born – while Nick Faldo was the last to win a major in the 1996 US Masters. But Rose is the third European winner of the US Open in the last four years following McDowell's win at Pebble Beach in 2010 and McIlroy's eight-shot triumph at Congressional 12 months later. McIlroy, who bent a club in frustration after a quadruple-bogey eight on the 11th on his way to a closing 76, wrote on Twitter: "So happy for JustinRose99! Couldn't happen to a better lad!" And McDowell added: "Congratulations to JustinRose99. Best player in the world the last few years. Major much deserved. £respect." Rose began the day two shots off the lead held by Mickelson, but with Merion playing havoc with the leading groups an outward nine containing three birdies and two bogeys was enough to give him a one-shot lead. After a three-putt bogey on the 11th, Rose heard the roars from behind as Mickelson holed his approach from the rough from 76 yards for an eagle on the 10th to jump back to the top of the leaderboard. But the 32-year-old promptly hit his second shot to the 12th to two feet for birdie and holed from 20ft for another at the 13th to reclaim the lead before the forecast rain arrived to make life even more difficult as he began the daunting closing stretch. The last five holes were all ranked among the nine toughest for the week, with the 18th the hardest at an average of 4.71. Mickelson had played that stretch in one under par, Rose in six over. The 14th and 16th duly cost Rose shots, but Mickelson bogeyed the 13th and 15th to leave Rose heading to the 18th tee with a one-shot lead over the American and Day, who then bogeyed the last. A perfect drive down the fairway saw Rose's ball come to rest just yards from the plaque which commemorates Ben Hogan's one-iron in the same situation in the 1950 US Open, a shot which helped get him into a play-off the following day which he went on to win 16 months after a near-fatal car crash. "I saw my ball in the fairway and I thought 'this is my moment'," Rose added. "I have seen that Ben Hogan photograph a million times and suddenly it was me with an iron into the fairway and two putts to win the US Open. "It was not quite two putts in the end (he hit a fairway wood 'chip' from the fringe) but I was just glad it worked out. I hit a great four iron shot so I feel like I did Hogan justice." Rose, who finished fourth in the Open as a 17-year-old amateur in 1998 and missed 21 cuts in a row after turning professional the next day, added: "It feels fantastic, absolutely amazing. "Going forward it gives me a lot of confidence. I don't know if it takes pressure off, but it's a moment where you can look back and think childhood dreams have come true." The 32-year-old raised his fingers to the sky after tapping in for par on the last in tribute to his father Ken, a massive influence on his career who died from leukaemia in 2002. "You saw me look to the heavens with it being Father's Day - I was just trying to remember my dad," Rose added. "My coach Sean Foley sent me a text this morning which said 'Go out there and be the man that your dad taught you to be and that your kids can look up to'." Justin Rose US Open Golf 2013 Golf US sports US Open Rory McIlroy guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time17 June 2013 09:53:54


Rory McIlroy fails to throw off his shackles at US Open

16 June 2013 23:18:02 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Northern Irishman shows flashes of quality – and frustration – before closing at Merion without a single round under par If Rory McIlroy is to be believed, the fine margins of golf render it likely that he will blast back to form any time soon. The alternative is that 2013 can already be considered a write-off for a player who rose to the summit of the world rankings last year, thereby apparently placing a marker down for years dominating the sport. McIlroy's US Open closed on Sunday afternoon without a single sub-par round. McIlroy has only looked close to returning to his finest touch in very isolated moments. On the final day he also displayed flashes of temper when tossing his club away on the 5th – en route to a double bogey – and bending another on the 11th after finding water from the fairway. Suggestions that what McIlroy achieved in 2012 meant the likes of Tiger Woods would be placed in the shade for the foreseeable future were wildly ambitious. Albeit Woods himself slipped rapidly from the Merion spotlight; scoring a fourth- round 74 which ensured he, like McIlroy, did not break 70 in the entire tournament. Woods finished 13-over par. McIlroy remains youthful enough to be inconsistent and throughout even the early stages of his career, has endured periods where he flies off the rails. Starting his fourth round at the year's second major when eight-over par and thereby too far back to challenge those at the summit of the leaderboard, needless to say, was not where McIlroy wanted to be. The explanation for that from the man himself was familiar. Some would argue, therefore, that his words are beginning to sound hollow. In a psychological sense, though, if the world No2 cannot convince himself that his fortunes are likely to change soon then he has little hope of returning to his most formidable touch. "It's close, you know," McIlroy said. "There are signs during every round that it's there and then it sort of hits a bit of a struggle for a few holes and then it comes back. "I think it's about confidence and fluidity. I don't have any other way to explain it. I have been working on the swing quite hard over the last few months and it looks really good on camera. I just get on the course and I hit a couple of bad shots and I guess that it sort of makes you lose confidence a little bit during the round. "It's just a bit of a struggle and it seems like if I've had a few too many tournaments this year where I've struggled in one round or a couple of rounds and not been able to put it all together. "I don't feel like it's too far away at all. Its just a matter of believing and staying patient and working hard and knowing that if you work on the right thing, you are going to turn it around." In McIlroy's defence, the US Open, and particularly this one, represents a curious week. Statistics show that he reached 11 from a possible 18 greens in regulation in his first round, 10 during round two and 11 again when returning a third successive round of 70 or more. From a possible 14 fairways, McIlroy hit 12 in round one, nine in round two and 11 in round three. The Northern Irishman's putting, which has been historically weak in relative terms but improved hugely last year, returned to being costly given a total of 89 over 54 holes. Those figures do not illustrate the full story of a set-up where one yard offline can be just as costly as 20. The best ball-strikers in the game will not necessarily profit at a course such as Merion. "If you're not on your game 100%, you get on the wrong side of the greens and it's just frightening," McIlroy added. "I missed a few shots here and there, I was trying on every shot out there and I was trying to get myself back into it, but it's tough. "You are hitting five irons off some tees and it's a tough tee shot for a par four. There were people talking about 62s and 63s at the start of the week and, I mean, I never saw that at all." Next for McIlroy is a return to the Irish Open, which this year will be staged at Dublin's Carton House. Albeit he is now fully accustomed to close scrutiny, the 24-year-old knows only too well what level of focus will be placed on his every move so close to home. In the background, McIlroy's break-up from his management company, Horizon, remains in the hands of lawyers. Which is little wonder, amid speculation it could cost the golfer in the region of £10m to break the contract he signed with the firm after leaving International Sports Management. McIlroy has also retained a close relationship with Woods, a friendship which from the outside seems to have been more beneficial to the world No1 than him. It would also be unfortunate if McIlroy should lose some of his natural charisma in an attempt to model himself more on Woods, who has been more robotic than ever during his week in Pennsylvania. McIlroy's choice of 2013 schedule, not least given his off-season equipment change, is open to question. There is already a suggestion he will not return to Wentworth, for example, for next year's PGA Championship. These, however, are subsidiary matters. McIlroy's most pressing aim is to return to the form which saw him swagger to victory at the US PGA Championship by the time his defence of that major gets under way at Oak Hill in early August. "Coming off the back of a great year last year, I guess I was expecting myself to emulate that or even try and do better and it hasn't really happened so far," admitted McIlroy. "That's been the most difficult [thing]. You always want to go out and play well and you want to contend and win tournaments. I haven't done enough of that this year." US Open Golf 2013 Rory McIlroy Tiger Woods US Open Golf US sports Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds  

Vice All News Time16 June 2013 23:18:02


US Open: Rory McIlroy looks to tropical storm for salvation at Merion

10 June 2013 12:58:38 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Tail-end of storm set to soften Pennsylvania course • Out-of-form world No2 is second favourite for US Open At what point does a slow start to a season become a slump? Rory McIlroy is in danger of discovering the answer to that question as he makes his latest practice steps towards salvation. McIlroy is generally priced up as the second favourite for this week's US Open – albeit a distant one to Tiger Woods – when there is little basis for the Northern Irishman being afforded such status. Apart, that is, from his ability to roar back to form after a troubled spell, as proven at the US PGA last year. McIlroy's other hope lies in the elements; the tail-end of a tropical storm may yet hit the course at Merion, Pennsylvania, softening it up to play more into the 24-year-old's favour. To describe McIlroy's year to date as indifferent would be doing him a favour. The world No2 has struggled in the US – he has only a single second-placed finish – and returned to Europe only to miss the cut at the PGA Championship. Included in this run has been McIlroy's infamous walk-off at the Honda Classic in March . The handling of that, plus legal action from one of his former sponsors, Oakley, are thought to be factors in an imminently formal split from his management company, Horizon. On face value, McIlroy and Horizon have clearly been good for each other. A multimillion-pound deal with Nike is evidence of that. Yet the split is not a harmonious one and is in the hands of lawyers. In the midst of this, McIlroy even took exception to the public comments of his close friend Graeme McDowell regarding this parting of the ways. Whatever else can safely be said of McIlroy, he is single-minded and never averse to change. The theme this year is whether that lack of continuity, either with equipment or with those looking after his affairs, is negatively influencing his on-course performance. McIlroy would firmly dismiss such a notion. Ominously for those who fancy him to triumph at the US Open, his basic flaws have ranged between putting troubles, poor connections with iron shots and wayward drives. McIlroy lies 106th in the PGA Tour's driving accuracy table and 122nd for strokes gained from putting. "It's not that far away," McIlroy said. That, however, has been an all-too familiar message. "My misses this year have been too wide. Last year if I missed a fairway or missed a shot, it wasn't by much. This year it seems the misses have been big and have cost me. I'm thinking back to Augusta, third day, missed a couple of tee shots right on the 7th and 11th, which sort of cost me on Saturday. "Sometimes it's not about how good your good shots are, it's about how much damage your bad shots do to you, and if you can limit that as much as you can then it's always going to be a good thing." Northern Ireland's other recent US Open winner looks a stronger candidate to profit at Merion than McIlroy. McDowell's driving accuracy is ranked as the best on the PGA Tour, with the 33-year-old's much-improved short game and scrambling ability also worthy of attention. McDowell has also made a habit of missing cuts immediately before winning. His early exit at Wentworth, alongside McIlroy, will not have overly perturbed him. "I'm happy sitting out every other weekend if it means picking up silverware every other Sunday," McDowell said. "The way I see the course is in three stages. The first six are tricky, the middle seven you can score on if you're in the fairway, while the last five are just brutal. The 15th is probably one of the hardest tee-shots you'll ever see. You actually have to hit it at the out-of-bounds. "The game shouldn't just be about distance. Of course it's exciting to see this new power-packed breed come along, who first learn to hit it a long way and then concentrate on the accuracy afterwards. "But the US Open is about testing every aspect of the golf game. And if mother nature obliges, Merion will do so and stage a great US Open. It'll be a unique place in major golf in so many ways." Unlike McIlroy, McDowell hopes that storm path changes. "I hope the conditions there in Philadelphia are fast and firm and that the rains don't arrive to make it soft and very scoreable," he added. "The USGA has been brave in taking it back to an old-school layout after such a long break. And it would be a shame if the modern pros butchered it." There doesn't seem much likelihood of that. Nor, all the evidence would suggest, of McIlroy announcing his return in Pennsylvania. US Open Golf 2013 US Open Rory McIlroy Graeme McDowell Golf US sports Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time10 June 2013 12:58:38


Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell friends again after Horizon spat

22 May 2013 18:44:43 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• McIlroy was upset McDowell discussed managerial split • 'I had a good chat with Graeme. Everything is good' Rory McIlroy has sought to resolve his problem with Graeme McDowell after the world No2 became irritated at his fellow Northern Irishman for speaking out publicly about issues with the pair's management company. McIlroy is on the verge of splitting from Horizon, the Dublin-based management firm he has been signed to since leaving International Sports Management in October 2011. McIlroy has refused to admit as much in public but McDowell, who remains a Horizon client, told reporters of the imminent break-up during last weekend's World Match Play Championship in Bulgaria. "I spoke to Graeme on Tuesday afternoon," McIlroy said. "We got back to the hotel and had a good chat. Everything is good. I am great friends with Graeme. He has been like a big brother to me on tour. I remember playing practice rounds with him at the Dunhill Links, for example, back in 2007, when I got my card. He really showed me the ropes out here for a couple of years; it's great to have friends on tour and he is obviously somebody that I consider a very good friend." When pressed on what seemed a visible strain between the pair at the start of this week, McIlroy added: "It is what it is and it's water under the bridge, and away we go." Contractual issues between McIlroy and Horizon mean the golfer is unwilling and unable to elaborate on the reasons behind their parting of the ways, which has been rumoured since the Masters in April. McIlroy is expected to control more of his own affairs in conjunction with one former Horizon employee and a lawyer. During his time with the company he won one of his two majors and earned a lucrative equipment deal with Nike. "I can't really comment on it," McIlroy added. "I don't want to get myself in a position I don't want to be in. The truth will all come out one day and I guess you'll just have to be patient. I can't comment on speculation at this point. You guys [the media] know that something is up, that's fair enough, but at this point I can't really say much more." Earlier, McIlroy had bizarrely claimed in a television interview: "If you want to be in the circus, you have to put up with the clowns." Golf Rory McIlroy Graeme McDowell Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time22 May 2013 18:44:43


Santander insider steps up to chief role

29 April 2013 14:15:22 Financials

The man to take over from Alfredo Sáenz as chief executive of Santander has run the Spanish bank’s asset management business for six years

Vice Finance Time29 April 2013 14:15:22


Santander chief executive resigns

29 April 2013 13:34:43 UK Homepage

Chief executive of Santander resigns ahead of a decision by Spain’s financial regulator over whether a criminal conviction should see him banned from banking

Vice All News Time29 April 2013 13:34:43


Santander chief executive resigns

29 April 2013 13:31:10 Financials

Chief executive of Santander resigns ahead of a decision by Spain’s financial regulator over whether a criminal conviction should see him banned from banking

Vice Finance Time29 April 2013 13:31:10


Rory McIlroy may have to represent Republic of Ireland in 2016 Olympics

24 April 2013 01:14:28 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Golfer could be spared choosing between Britain and Republic • McIlroy may have to represent nation he played for as amateur Rory McIlroy may have the decision over which country he represents at the 2016 Olympic Games taken out of his own hands, with legislation potentially stating he must turn out for the Republic of Ireland. McIlroy, from Holywood in Northern Ireland, has spoken of his unease over having to make a choice between Great Britain and the Republic when golf returns to the Olympic roster. The world No2 has even floated the possibility of dodging political sensitivities by opting not to play in Rio at all. Now Peter Dawson, the chief executive of the Royal & Ancient, has revealed McIlroy may be spared the decision. Dawson said: "I think because Rory's history of playing for Ireland at amateur level and, I think at World Cup level, that there may be a regulation within the Olympic rules that would require him to stay with that. It's quite ambiguous really but there is a rule that a player who has represented one nation at a previous world championships from certain countries, that carries with you." McIlroy has twice played for Ireland at the World Cup. Dawson added: "Is the golf World Cup a world championship? Golf isn't structured the same way as other sports ... but I would very much like to take this burden of choice away from the player if we can possibly do it because it's not fair to him. I think he has made it pretty clear in one of two pronouncements that he's worried about it and the last thing we want is players worrying about this." Dawson also highlighted his unhappiness with certain elements of the golfing fraternity in the United States, who have voiced their strong opposition to the proposed ban on anchored putting strokes. The ban, due to come into force in 2016, was subject to a comment phase which closed at the end of February. The R&A and United States Golf Association will make an announcement on whether or not they will proceed with the ban later this year. "We have had some quite strong remarks from the PGA Tour and particularly from the PGA of America," Dawson said. "A comment period turned into a campaign, which was a bit unusual. "The PGA of America know my views about this. I'm disappointed at the way that campaign was conducted. It put rule-making on to the negotiating table. People have taken position that they will now have to back off from or maintain." Dawson stressed that the prospect of legal action against golf's ruling bodies, should they prohibit anchored strokes, is not one which fazes him. "The game of golf doesn't need legal action, that's for sure," said the chief executive. "It would be disappointing were that to happen. Threats of legal action don't affect rule-making. Rule-making is done on what the rules people consider is in the best interests of the game." Rory McIlroy Golf Olympic Games 2016 US sports Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time24 April 2013 01:14:28


The new Santander advert: making sport creepy

20 April 2013 07:15:01 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

'He looks so lost and awkward, yet so blankly creepy, that you may want to simultaneously cuddle him and bludgeon him with one of his own clubs' Reading this on mobile? Click here to view Every successful sportsperson needs a hobby. Footballers buy racehorses (Wayne Rooney) or go carp fishing (John Terry). Some tennis players own fashion brands (Venus Williams). In their downtime sportspeople also appear in adverts. And look! Here's scarlet-faced golf pixie Rory McIlroy infiltrating homes across the country to update you about the latest banking deals. "With a 123 current account, you can get 1% cashback on your water bills," he says, sinisterly appearing in the bathroom mirror like the seed of Chucky with a country club membership. He stares. There's an awkward pause. He pats a man's face with a towel. He stares again. Jenson Button is in it, too – advert super-fans may remember him rhyming "racing", "spacing" and "bracing" to demonstrate just how good anti-dandruff shampoo was in 2011 – as is Jessica Ennis. But really this belongs to the permanently polo-shirted ball hitter. Next he's in the home of an artist. He reaches into her fruit bowl. He picks up an apple. He says something about interest. He bites the apple. He looks so lost and awkward, yet so blankly creepy, that you may want to simultaneously cuddle him and bludgeon him with one of his own clubs just to make it end. There's only one positive to take from it, and it isn't financial advice. When a fan recently tweeted @McIlroyRory that he was "a terrible actor", he showed a very un-celeb-like level of self-awareness. It was very refreshing. "I have to agree!!" he replied. "No oscars coming my way anytime soon!" Oscar? Let's hope Santander takes pity, and never makes him act again. Advertising Television Television industry Rory McIlroy guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time20 April 2013 07:15:01


Santander might compensate 30,000

19 April 2013 14:29:53 BBC News - UK

Santander, the country's second biggest mortgage provider, says 30,000 former Abbey customers may be due compensation, after errors made in 2008.

Vice All News Time19 April 2013 14:29:53