Liverpool hooligans jailed 2014

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In pictures: Liverpool Biennial 2014

07 July 2014 02:07:08 BBC News - UK

Derelict union office becomes art gallery in Liverpool

Vice All News Time07 July 2014 02:07:08


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World Cup 2014: England fans attacked by hooligans in Sao Paulo

20 June 2014 05:16:23 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

England fans preparing for the match against Uruguay are attacked with petrol bombs and "mortars" in a bar in Sao Paulo

Vice All News Time20 June 2014 05:16:23


World Cup 2014: England fans attacked by hooligans in Sao Paulo

19 June 2014 22:54:58 Sport

England fans preparing for the match against Uruguay are attacked with petrol bombs and "mortars" in a bar in Sao Paulo

Vice All News Time19 June 2014 22:54:58


World Cup 2014: England fans attacked by hooligans in Sao Paulo

19 June 2014 22:10:38 UK headlines

England fans preparing for the match against Uruguay are attacked with missiles in a bar in Sao Paulo

Vice All News Time19 June 2014 22:10:38


World Cup 2014: Inside Brazilian jail cells where English hooligans will be locked up

10 June 2014 13:27:37 mirror - News

Any fans who cause trouble face being thrown into cramped cells, controlled by dangerous criminals, and at risk of disease

Vice All News Time10 June 2014 13:27:37


Hillsborough 'hooliganism' apology

21 March 2014 14:52:26 BBC News - UK

A newspaper apologises "unreservedly" for publishing an article that appeared to link hooliganism with the Hillsborough disaster.

Vice All News Time21 March 2014 14:52:26


Video: Lincoln City hooligans jailed after violent clashes with Luton Town supporters in front of terrified shoppers

13 December 2013 19:01:03 mirror - News

The pack of thugs attacked rival fans as they drank in a town centre pub before the fixture last October

Vice All News Time13 December 2013 19:01:03


Video: Lincoln City hooligans jailed after violent clashes with Luton Town supporters in front of terrified shoppers

13 December 2013 18:53:53 mirror - Sport

The pack of thugs attacked rival fans as they drank in a town centre pub before the fixture last October

Vice Sport Time13 December 2013 18:53:53


Crematorium flower thief jailed

30 October 2013 20:41:41 BBC News - UK

A woman is jailed for stealing flowers from a Liverpool crematorium which she then sold on at a profit.

Vice All News Time30 October 2013 20:41:41


Italian hooligans jailed for attack on Tottenham Hotspur supporters in Rome bar

30 October 2013 04:18:08 News | Mail Online

The severe beating by a mob in a central Rome pub last November left 13 Tottenham Hotspur supporters injured and one fighting for his life in hospital.

Vice All News Time30 October 2013 04:18:08


Italian hooligans jailed for attack on Tottenham Hotspur supporters in Rome bar

29 October 2013 16:04:55 Football | Mail Online

Two Italian football hooligans who took part in a brutal attack on a group of Tottenham Hotspur fans in a bar in Rome last November have been jailed.

Vice Football Time29 October 2013 16:04:55


Italian hooligans jailed for attack on Tottenham Hotspur supporters in Rome bar

29 October 2013 13:06:46 Sport | Mail Online

Two Italian football hooligans who took part in a brutal attack on a group of Tottenham Hotspur fans in a bar in Rome last November have been jailed.

Vice Sport Time29 October 2013 13:06:46


Italian football hooligans jailed for unprovoked attack on Tottenham Hotspur fans in Rome

29 October 2013 11:52:53 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Two Italian football hooligans have been jailed for a total of 10 years for their role in the unprovoked attack on Tottenham fans last November.        

Vice All News Time29 October 2013 11:52:53


Italian football hooligans jailed for unprovoked attack on Tottenham Hotspur fans in Rome

29 October 2013 11:51:44 Sport

Two Italian football hooligans have been jailed for a total of 10 years for their role in the unprovoked attack on Tottenham fans last November.        

Vice All News Time29 October 2013 11:51:44


Extradited PC jailed for child rape

24 October 2013 14:32:15 BBC News - UK

A retired policeman is jailed for child abuse offences while he was an officer serving in Lancashire and Liverpool in the 1960s and 70s.

Vice All News Time24 October 2013 14:32:15


Russia reduces Greenpeace Arctic activists' charges to 'hooliganism'

24 October 2013 04:38:10 News | Mail Online

The change of charges means that instead of a possible 15 years imprisonment for piracy the 'Arctic 30' could face seven years in jail.

Vice All News Time24 October 2013 04:38:10


Clerk jailed for licence points scam

13 September 2013 15:45:49 BBC News - UK

A court clerk from Liverpool is jailed for six years for wiping points off people's driving licences in exchange for cash.

Vice All News Time13 September 2013 15:45:49


QPR hooligan smirked after he stabbed Everton fan who tried to stop attack on woman

04 September 2013 19:19:36 mirror - Sport

He was jailed for five years and banned for eight years from going within a mile of any stadium where QPR are playing

Vice Sport Time04 September 2013 19:19:36


QPR hooligan smirked after he stabbed Everton fan who tried to stop attack on woman

04 September 2013 19:16:54 mirror - News

He was jailed for five years and banned for eight years from going within a mile of any stadium where QPR are playing

Vice All News Time04 September 2013 19:16:54


West Ham hooligan jailed for 12 months for organising clash with Millwall supporters

20 August 2013 01:15:36 mirror - News

Shaun Sheridan, a member of West Ham’s notorious Inter City Firm, plotted mass violence in a series of text messages to his rivals

Vice All News Time20 August 2013 01:15:36


West Ham hooligan jailed for 12 months for organising clash with Millwall supporters

20 August 2013 01:05:45 mirror - Sport

Shaun Sheridan, a member of West Ham’s notorious Inter City Firm, plotted mass violence in a series of text messages to his rivals

Vice Sport Time20 August 2013 01:05:45


Hooligan jailed for arranging violence between West Ham and Millwall

19 August 2013 12:47:56 Sport | Mail Online

A football hooligan who organised a clash between Millwall and West Ham fans on the day of an FA Cup match has been jailed for 12 months.

Vice Sport Time19 August 2013 12:47:56


Tycoon in TV punch trial 'ready for jail': Both sides expect Lebedev to be found guilty over attack during heated debate

24 June 2013 03:20:34 News | Mail Online

Alexander Lebedev (pictured) faces the charge of hooliganism motivated by 'political hatred' which carries a maximum penalty of five years in jail. The newspaper owner said he is 'steeling' himself for a prison sentence.

Vice All News Time24 June 2013 03:20:34


Mother and sons jailed for drug plot

14 June 2013 23:12:55 BBC News - UK

Three members of a "notorious" criminal family in Liverpool are jailed over a failed plot to smuggle more than £6m of heroin into Britain.

Vice All News Time14 June 2013 23:12:55


Glasgow-Liverpool drug gang jailed

20 May 2013 21:41:24 BBC News - UK

Eight members of a Liverpool-based drugs gang are jailed for supplying tens of millions of pounds worth of cocaine and heroin to Glasgow.

Vice All News Time20 May 2013 21:41:24


Cocaine and heroin couriers jailed

16 May 2013 21:09:45 BBC News - UK

Members of a Liverpool-based gang that supplied cocaine and heroin worth tens of millions of pounds to Glasgow are jailed.

Vice All News Time16 May 2013 21:09:45


Police arrest Millwall football hooligan in dawn raid

23 April 2013 22:03:47 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Police have arrested three men in dawn raids in connection with violence at an FA Cup match between Millwall and Wigan. Related Stories Liverpool fans react to Luis Suarez 'biting' Liverpool fans defend Luis Suarez over 'biting' incident Liverpool 'working with Luis Suarez on discipline'        

Vice All News Time23 April 2013 22:03:47


Football should beware the seeds of hooliganism taking root again | David Lacey

19 April 2013 12:56:47 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

The speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past A ghost walked over football's grave last weekend. As the nation prepared to bury the 80s with the funeral of Margaret Thatcher stark reminders of the game's most wretched decade glared out from television screens and news pages. During Saturday's FA Cup semi-final Millwall fans fought among themselves at Wembley. After Newcastle United had lost 3-0 at home to Sunderland on Sunday some of their supporters tried to confront visiting fans at the railway station and pelted police with missiles, injuring three of them. By the violent standards of the 70s and 80s these incidents were relatively minor. Thirty or 40 years ago they would barely have merited a paragraph or two of news coverage. In football the stage had been reached at which stuff like this was a weekly routine. Margaret Thatcher was not football's worst enemy. Football's most formidable opponent was a reluctance to face up to its responsibilities in the matter of crowd control. The prime minister only put her oar in when it became obvious that football hooliganism was disrupting the lives of people who had nothing to do with the game but just happened to live near a ground. For years householders were forced to board up their front windows and live in back rooms on match days. Things came to a head in March 1985 when Luton Town met Millwall at Kenilworth Road in an FA Cup quarter‑final and visiting supporters stage a prearranged riot. Having met up in London they travelled to Luton en masse and right on cue invaded the pitch, forcing the referee to take the teams off for 25 minutes while fans fought the outnumbered police. Nine days earlier the second leg of a Milk Cup semi-final between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge had also been disrupted by a pitch invasion which brought on mounted police. Ken Bates, the Chelsea chairman, complained about a lack of government action to curb the mayhem and given the limp responses of the Football Association seemed to have a point. All the FA did in this instance was warn Chelsea about their future conduct. Luton were ordered to fence off their pitch and Millwall were fined £7,500, which was not much even then. Mrs Thatcher had an hour-long meeting with her ministers to discuss football violence and expressed her disappointment with the game's authorities' apparent inability to face up to the problem. A meeting between government and football representatives at Downing Street failed to produce any new ideas. The only, somewhat extreme, innovation was short-lived. Chelsea erected an 11ft electrified fence around their pitch hoping to deter invaders with a 12-volt charge but the Greater London council threatened legal action and the thing was not switched on. All this and worse was to come. On the last day of the season rubbish which for years had been allowed to accumulate under the main stand at Bradford City's ground caught fire and 56 died in the inferno. On the same afternoon Leeds United fans went on the rampage at Birmingham City and a boy was killed when a wall collapsed. Rarely had such a combination of complacency and impotence been demonstrated so graphically in the space of one afternoon. Heysel was 18 days away. Even then there were those in the game who insisted that hooliganism was society's problem, not football's, and that clubs could not be held responsible for what happened away from their grounds. All they did was put up steel fences to keep spectators off the playing area and four years later the terrible logic of this practice led to Hillsborough when cackhanded policing at an FA Cup semi-final resulted in 96 Liverpool supporters, whose only offence had been to arrive early, being crushed to death behind one of the goals. The Taylor Report, all-seater stadiums, bans on alcohol and the fact that unruly elements have largely been priced out should have minimised the chance of football grounds again becoming death traps. Moreover the speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past. All the same a watchful eye will need to be kept on this weekend's matches in case the seeds of violence look like putting down roots. The 80s should remain a fading bad memory. Football violence Margaret Thatcher David Lacey guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time19 April 2013 12:56:47


Football should beware the seeds of hooliganism taking root again | David Lacey

19 April 2013 12:45:21 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

The speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past A ghost walked over football's grave last weekend. As the nation prepared to bury the 80s with the funeral of Margaret Thatcher stark reminders of the game's most wretched decade glared out from television screens and news pages. During Saturday's FA Cup semi-final Millwall fans fought among themselves at Wembley. After Newcastle United had lost 3-0 at home to Sunderland on Sunday some of their supporters tried to confront visiting fans at the railway station and pelted police with missiles, injuring three of them. By the violent standards of the 70s and 80s these incidents were relatively minor. Thirty or 40 years ago they would barely have merited a paragraph or two of news coverage. In football the stage had been reached at which stuff like this was a weekly routine. Margaret Thatcher was not football's worst enemy. Football's most formidable opponent was a reluctance to face up to its responsibilities in the matter of crowd control. The prime minister only put her oar in when it became obvious that football hooliganism was disrupting the lives of people who had nothing to do with the game but just happened to live near a ground. For years householders were forced to board up their front windows and live in back rooms on match days. Things came to a head in March 1985 when Luton Town met Millwall at Kenilworth Road in an FA Cup quarter‑final and visiting supporters stage a prearranged riot. Having met up in London they travelled to Luton en masse and right on cue invaded the pitch, forcing the referee to take the teams off for 25 minutes while fans fought the outnumbered police. Nine days earlier the second leg of a Milk Cup semi-final between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge had also been disrupted by a pitch invasion which brought on mounted police. Ken Bates, the Chelsea chairman, complained about a lack of government action to curb the mayhem and given the limp responses of the Football Association seemed to have a point. All the FA did in this instance was warn Chelsea about their future conduct. Luton were ordered to fence off their pitch and Millwall were fined £7,500, which was not much even then. Mrs Thatcher had an hour-long meeting with her ministers to discuss football violence and expressed her disappointment with the game's authorities' apparent inability to face up to the problem. A meeting between government and football representatives at Downing Street failed to produce any new ideas. The only, somewhat extreme, innovation was short-lived. Chelsea erected an 11ft electrified fence around their pitch hoping to deter invaders with a 12-volt charge but the Greater London council threatened legal action and the thing was not switched on. All this and worse was to come. On the last day of the season rubbish which for years had been allowed to accumulate under the main stand at Bradford City's ground caught fire and 56 died in the inferno. On the same afternoon Leeds United fans went on the rampage at Birmingham City and a boy was killed when a wall collapsed. Rarely had such a combination of complacency and impotence been demonstrated so graphically in the space of one afternoon. Heysel was 18 days away. Even then there were those in the game who insisted that hooliganism was society's problem, not football's, and that clubs could not be held responsible for what happened away from their grounds. All they did was put up steel fences to keep spectators off the playing area and four years later the terrible logic of this practice led to Hillsborough when cackhanded policing at an FA Cup semi-final resulted in 96 Liverpool supporters, whose only offence had been to arrive early, being crushed to death behind one of the goals. The Taylor Report, all-seater stadiums, bans on alcohol and the fact that unruly elements have largely been priced out should have minimised the chance of football grounds again becoming death traps. Moreover the speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past. All the same a watchful eye will need to be kept on this weekend's matches in case the seeds of violence look like putting down roots. The 80s should remain a fading bad memory. Football violence Margaret Thatcher David Lacey guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time19 April 2013 12:45:21


Football should beware the seeds of hooliganism taking root again | David Lacey

19 April 2013 12:40:13 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

The speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past A ghost walked over football's grave last weekend. As the nation prepared to bury the 80s with the funeral of Margaret Thatcher stark reminders of the game's most wretched decade glared out from television screens and news pages. During Saturday's FA Cup semi-final Millwall fans fought among themselves at Wembley. After Newcastle United had lost 3-0 at home to Sunderland on Sunday some of their supporters tried to confront visiting fans at the railway station and pelted police with missiles, injuring three of them. By the violent standards of the 70s and 80s these incidents were relatively minor. Thirty or 40 years ago they would barely have merited a paragraph or two of news coverage. In football the stage had been reached at which stuff like this was a weekly routine. Margaret Thatcher was not football's worst enemy. Football's most formidable opponent was a reluctance to face up to its responsibilities in the matter of crowd control. The prime minister only put her oar in when it became obvious that football hooliganism was disrupting the lives of people who had nothing to do with the game but just happened to live near a ground. For years householders were forced to board up their front windows and live in back rooms on match days. Things came to a head in March 1985 when Luton Town met Millwall at Kenilworth Road in an FA Cup quarter‑final and visiting supporters stage a prearranged riot. Having met up in London they travelled to Luton en masse and right on cue invaded the pitch, forcing the referee to take the teams off for 25 minutes while fans fought the outnumbered police. Nine days earlier the second leg of a Milk Cup semi-final between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge had also been disrupted by a pitch invasion which brought on mounted police. Ken Bates, the Chelsea chairman, complained about a lack of government action to curb the mayhem and given the limp responses of the Football Association seemed to have a point. All the FA did in this instance was warn Chelsea about their future conduct. Luton were ordered to fence off their pitch and Millwall were fined £7,500, which was not much even then. Mrs Thatcher had an hour-long meeting with her ministers to discuss football violence and expressed her disappointment with the game's authorities' apparent inability to face up to the problem. A meeting between government and football representatives at Downing Street failed to produce any new ideas. The only, somewhat extreme, innovation was short-lived. Chelsea erected an 11ft electrified fence around their pitch hoping to deter invaders with a 12-volt charge but the Greater London council threatened legal action and the thing was not switched on. All this and worse was to come. On the last day of the season rubbish which for years had been allowed to accumulate under the main stand at Bradford City's ground caught fire and 56 died in the inferno. On the same afternoon Leeds United fans went on the rampage at Birmingham City and a boy was killed when a wall collapsed. Rarely had such a combination of complacency and impotence been demonstrated so graphically in the space of one afternoon. Heysel was 18 days away. Even then there were those in the game who insisted that hooliganism was society's problem, not football's, and that clubs could not be held responsible for what happened away from their grounds. All they did was put up steel fences to keep spectators off the playing area and four years later the terrible logic of this practice led to Hillsborough when cackhanded policing at an FA Cup semi-final resulted in 96 Liverpool supporters, whose only offence had been to arrive early, being crushed to death behind one of the goals. The Taylor Report, all-seater stadiums, bans on alcohol and the fact that unruly elements have largely been priced out should have minimised the chance of football grounds again becoming death traps. Moreover the speed with which Millwall and Newcastle have reacted in trying to track down those who caused trouble last weekend is a refreshing contrast to the foot-dragging responses of the past. All the same a watchful eye will need to be kept on this weekend's matches in case the seeds of violence look like putting down roots. The 80s should remain a fading bad memory. Football violence Margaret Thatcher David Lacey guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time19 April 2013 12:40:13