Shana Ann Rose Halliday

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VIDEO: I took three bullets for Princess Anne

19 March 2014 04:36:10 BBC News - UK

The day I took three bullets for Princess Anne

Vice All News Time19 March 2014 04:36:10


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Ann Summers to sell Knickerbox

15 March 2014 22:46:44 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

Tesco and Debenhams could bid for underwear brand        

Vice All News Time15 March 2014 22:46:44


Malala set for Anne Frank Award

29 January 2014 18:23:27 BBC News - UK

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenage activist who was shot by the Taliban, is to receive the Anne Frank award for moral courage.

Vice All News Time29 January 2014 18:23:27


VIDEO: Princess Anne makes horsemeat claim

15 November 2013 11:38:05 BBC News - UK

Princess Anne has suggested that British attitudes to eating horsemeat might have to change to improve the standards of care for the animals.

Vice All News Time15 November 2013 11:38:05


Resusci Anne and the Mona Lisa of the Seine

16 October 2013 11:05:03 BBC News - UK

Millions have learned CPR on a mannequin known as Resusci Anne, whose face is based on that of a 19th Century beauty. Do we really know anything about her?

Vice All News Time16 October 2013 11:05:03


Liverpool footballer Raheem Sterling found NOT GUILTY of assaulting girlfriend after trial collapses

20 September 2013 18:36:57 mirror - Sport

The case against the 18-year-old collapsed midway through a trial after the prosecution objected to the evidence of his partner Shana Halliday

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 18:36:57


Raheem Sterling: Case dropped against Liverpool footballer assaulting ex-girlfriend

20 September 2013 18:25:00 Football | Mail Online

The court case against Raheem Sterling - where it was alleged he had assaulted an ex-girlfriend - has been dropped. The case against the Liverpool winger collapsed when Shana Ann Rose Halliday failed to support the prosecution's case by giving 'disappointing' evidence at Liverpool Magistrates' Court.

Vice Football Time20 September 2013 18:25:00


Raheem Sterling: Case dropped against Liverpool footballer assaulting ex-girlfriend

20 September 2013 18:02:57 Sport | Mail Online

The court case against Raheem Sterling - where it was alleged he had assaulted an ex-girlfriend - has been dropped. The case against the Liverpool winger collapsed when Shana Ann Rose Halliday failed to support the prosecution's case by giving 'disappointing' evidence at Liverpool Magistrates' Court.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 18:02:57


Case against Raheem Sterling assaulting ex-girlfriend dropped

20 September 2013 17:42:09 Sport | Mail Online

The court case against Raheem Sterling - where it was alleged he had assaulted an ex-girlfriend - has been dropped. The case against the Liverpool winger collapsed when Shana Ann Rose Halliday failed to support the prosecution's case by giving 'disappointing' evidence at Liverpool Magistrates' Court.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 17:42:09


Raheem Sterling trial: Live updates as Liverpool footballer faces charges of assaulting girlfriend

20 September 2013 15:50:03 mirror - News

Live updates from the Liverpool Echo as Liverpool and England star Raheem Sterling, 19, faces trial accused of attacking girlfriend Shana Halliday

Vice All News Time20 September 2013 15:50:03


Princess Anne to visit belligerent Argentina

18 August 2013 09:06:27 UK headlines

The Princess Royal is to visit Argentina amid growing tensions over the Falkland Islands.        

Vice All News Time18 August 2013 09:06:27


Raheem Sterling arrested for alleged assault of girlfriend Shana Ann Rose

09 August 2013 16:05:35 Football | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Ann Rose after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Football Time09 August 2013 16:05:35


Liverpool winger Raheem Sterling appears in court accused of beating his 20-year-old girlfriend

09 August 2013 15:57:14 News | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling (left) denied assaulting his girlfriend Shana Halliday (right) when he appeared at Liverpool Magistrates' Court today.

Vice All News Time09 August 2013 15:57:14


Raheem Sterling arrested for assaulting girlfriend Shana Ann Rose

09 August 2013 15:33:18 Football | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Ann Rose after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Football Time09 August 2013 15:33:18


Raheem Sterling arrested for alleged assault of girlfriend Shana Ann Rose

09 August 2013 15:30:10 Sport | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Ann Rose after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Sport Time09 August 2013 15:30:10


Raheem Sterling arrested for assaulting girlfriend Shana Halliday

09 August 2013 15:02:04 Football | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Halliday after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Football Time09 August 2013 15:02:04


Raheem Sterling arrested for assaulting girlfriend Shana Ann Rose

09 August 2013 14:58:58 Sport | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Ann Rose after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Sport Time09 August 2013 14:58:58


Raheem Sterling arrested for assaulting girlfriend Shana Halliday

09 August 2013 14:37:34 Sport | Mail Online

Raheem Sterling has pleaded not guilty to assaulting his girlfriend Shana Halliday after he spent the night in a police cell following his arrest on Thursday night.

Vice Sport Time09 August 2013 14:37:34


Anne Keothavong announces retirement

24 July 2013 13:26:57 Sport

The 29 year-old, who reached a career-high of 48, is joining BT Sport as part of team to cover WTA Tour.        

Vice Sport Time24 July 2013 13:26:57


The Open 2013: Lee Westwood can emulate Adam Scott and Justin Rose

19 July 2013 22:59:52 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Westwood lies one shot off the lead after two rounds • Tiger Woods also one shot behind Miguel Angel Jiménez If 2013 is to continue as the year in which major championships reward those who have often contended and never won, Lee Westwood's chances of a Muirfield triumph must be taken seriously. And make no mistake: on a course which rewards wonderful ball strikers Westwood's challenge is already strongly acknowledged. Adam Scott's success at the Masters was widely celebrated – understandably after the Australian's painful collapse at the climax of the Open Championship at Royal Lytham and St Anne's last July. When an emotional Justin Rose claimed the US Open a month ago, again it was a victory which generated a wave of positive sentiment. Rose had worked tirelessly through professional and personal turmoil to the extent that he was a fitting major winner. Westwood has toiled to shrug off a 'nearly man' tag which causes him obvious annoyance whenever his historic major shortcomings are raised. Yet the topic itself is actually a compliment to Westwood, who has a level of ability which completely contradicts his major drought. With respect, significantly inferior players to Westwood have a major, or majors, to their name. "I felt pretty comfortable," said Westwood after his second-round 68, which leaves him at an aggregate of two under par and a shot from the summit of the leaderboard. "I was hitting the ball well, putting nicely. The golf course got really difficult. The finish is tough; 16, 17, 18 are playing hard. So it's like most major championships, it's a grind out there. "I love playing the Open Championship. This is the biggest tournament of the year for me, being a Brit, and it being played in Britain. And why not enjoy it out there? It's tough for everybody. So smile your way through." Westwood had been positively beaming as he reached five under, and six under for the day, through 12 holes. A stumble over the closing stretch was to follow although, as Westwood himself rightly acknowledged, the closing holes have proved the most hazardous area of the links. This marked the first time in 19 Open second rounds that Westwood had carded under 70. Needless to say, he will not have it all his own way from now on. Tiger Woods, Dustin Johnson and a rejuvenated Henrik Stenson are tied on the same score, 140, while Miguel Angel Jiménez leads the way. On Friday standing still was generally akin to taking three steps forward. Woods may continue to give the impression that he is battling but one of his playing partners, Graeme McDowell, offered an ominous assessment for the remainder of this Open field. "He was very, very impressive over the last two days," McDowell said. "He will not be far away this weekend the way he's playing. "Iron play, the flight control that he has in his irons, he just hits the shot that you're supposed to hit at all times. He plays the golf course very conservatively, which I expected him to do because his iron play is, well, I'm not sure there's a better iron player in the world. It's incredible how well he controls his ball flight. And he's putting exceptionally well. "I said to him on the 18th green: 'That was a clinic the last two days. That was very impressive.' Combine that with some great putting and he is going to be dangerous." Stenson recovered from the trauma of a double-bogey six at the 6th to sign for a 70. The Swede had tumbled into golfing oblivion, and not for the first time, until recently. "I'm just very happy," Stenson said. "I'm taking all my hits on the chinand just moving on. That's kind of the mindset you have to have at these events. "You know it's going to be tough. And sometimes you might not feel like it's fair but we're all playing the same course and you've got to keep on going forward, not backwards. I'm very happy with the patience and then the mental balance that I've managed to keep these first two days, to leave with a double bogey and go up and birdie the next and pretend it never happened. That's one of the secrets to do well in this game and especially in these tournaments." Albeit several ships short of an armada, the Spanish challenge continued courtesy of the colourful Jiménez and Rafael Cabrera-Bello. Jiménez, at 49, is clearly relishing his return to golfing prominence. In doing so he is making a mockery of the fact he has only once finished in an Open top 10 since 2001. Cabrera-Bello sits with Martin Laird, Zach Johnson and Angel Cabrera at one under. Of that group only Laird played the back nine in under par. Among those to toil on Friday afternoon were Brandt Snedeker and Phil Mickelson. Snedeker followed up his first round of 68 with a ruinous 79 while Mickelson's 74 moved him back to four from the lead. Also at one over, Scott cannot be discounted from proceedings. Likewise Ian Poulter, who has the same 36-hole score. "There's a bit of weight off the shoulders, having won a major," said Scott. "But I still haven't won the Open, so the nerves and the anxiety are still there to win this event. But overall it's a great feeling, that's for sure. "There was some instant satisfaction when it was all happening [at the Masters]. It has been all very, very good. But I've got to come out and play golf and I can't rest on my laurels and it's not the only thing I wanted to win in my career. So I have got plenty more work to do." Those to tumble out after 36 holes included a troubled Rory McIlroy, Rose and Luke Donald. If they look on from afar over the weekend, at least a small sense of relief is inevitable. This Open challenge, which is already stiff, will not be made the slightest bit easier. The Open 2013 Lee Westwood Tiger Woods The Open Golf Ewan Murray guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds  

Vice Golf Time19 July 2013 22:59:52


Justin Rose: Pictures through the years

17 June 2013 12:12:26 BBC News - UK

Looking back at the Justin Rose's career

Vice All News Time17 June 2013 12:12:26


Strictly Ann by Ann Widdecombe – digested

16 June 2013 21:12:29 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

John Crace reduces the autobiography of the former Conservative MP and sometime ballroom dancer to a catechismal 600 words Twice in recent years, the makers of Who Do You Think You Are? have approached me to see if my ancestry might be sufficiently interesting for their programme. Both times, they thought it wasn't: a decision vindicated by the first 100 pages of this book. I was born in 1947 and, as with most children of my generation, my parents made formal arrangements to see me five times a year. This might strike some readers as rather old-fashioned, but I believe children are now far too indulged by their parents, which is why so many go on to take drugs, become homosexualists and vote Labour. At my school, I was distressed to find that mass was conducted in Latin. For classicists like myself, this was not a problem, but I strongly felt that ordinary people were being prevented from having the Mysteries of God revealed to them. Thus I wrote to the Pope and was extremely pleased that, in 1962 at the Second Vatican Council , it was announced that my recommendations had been adopted in full. Having taken a first degree at Birmingham, I reapplied to Oxford, as I was certain it would be ideally suited to an ambition that exceeded my talent. My judgment was correct, for I emerged three years later having been unsuccessful in my attempts to become president of the Union. Though, for the record, many believed I was the victim of a scandalous miscarriage of justice within the electoral procedure, an outrage I have now entirely forgotten. I do not propose to indulge people's gutter instincts for salacious gossip by revealing whether or not I held hands with my only boyfriend, Colin Maltby. Nor will I comment on him having been later heard to say: "I dodged a bullet there." Suffice to say that I am extremely happy to have remained single ever since, as it has allowed me to fully devote myself to serving God, the Conservative party and my cats. It was incumbent on me to find work and for some years I toiled unhappily for Unilever, where I'm told my leaving speech is still regarded as one of the finest ever, before embarking on my political career. Having failed to ingratiate myself with the constituents of Burnley and Devonport – some people refuse to be helped, no matter what you do for them - I was eventually elected member for the safe seat of Maidstone. I did not make an immediate impact at Westminster, as senior politicians were suspicious of talented newcomers who knew a great deal more than they did about everything and were not afraid to say so. Eventually my preferment could not be delayed, and I was happy to have a distinguished career as a junior minister at the Home Office during which I achieved very little. Losing the general election was a blow, but the real tragedy for the Conservative party came in 2001 when it emerged I had absolutely no support for my futile leadership bid. Many people – well, me – have since said I would have been a brilliant leader, but it is not for me to comment. I have never been afraid to speak with the courage of my convictions, which is why, after the Church of England voted to allow women priests, I converted to Catholicism. Although I have always been very pro-women's rights – even for those with lesbian instincts, of which I am not one – it is a sin to go against the will of God. On a lighter note, I was later very fortunate to meet the Pope, who told me he had never previously met a person with such inner holiness. After leaving parliament, many people thought I should have been elevated to the House of Lords, but for reasons best known to Mr Cameron that was not to be, and, as I am not one to hold a grudge, I have happily moved on. However, Mr Cameron did ask me to be his envoy to the Vatican, though this appointment clashed with Strictly Come Dancing. Faced with such a tough choice, I asked God to give me a sign. He did: he gave me a detached retina. Truly, He and I move in mysterious ways. Digested read, digested: Strictly Self-Advancing. Autobiography and memoir Ann Widdecombe Biography John Crace guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time16 June 2013 21:12:29


Strictly Ann: The Autobiography by Ann Widdecombe – review

10 June 2013 09:14:43 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Devoid of grace, humour or feeling, the former Conservative MP's autobiography serves as a corrective to her 'national treasure' status When Ann Widdecombe appeared on Strictly Come Dancing in 2010, the judges were not complimentary, describing her variously as "a dancing hippo", "a Dalek in drag" and " the Ark Royal ". Len Goodman, exasperated that she had somehow crept into the quarter finals, likened her to haemorrhoids: "You keep coming back more painful than ever," he said, in the dazed moments after she and her partner, Anton du Beke, had completed their Titanic -inspired interpretation of the rumba . Fortunately, a cure for Len's painful posterior was just around the corner. The following week, she finally made her exit, she and Anton having scored just 14 points out of 40. Widdy had been dragged across the Blackpool ballroom "like a Hoover or something" for the last time. Is Widdecombe's writing any better than her dancing? No. About the best you can say for her prose is that it is accurate. Her grammar is fine – Ann is a stickler for grammar – and her anecdotes make sense in that they have a beginning, a middle and an end. Her attention to detail is exemplary, if you're the kind of reader who really does long to know precisely where she stands on the matter of apostolic succession or Michael Howard's sacking of the former director of HM Prison Service, Derek Lewis. But in every other respect her memoirs bear a strong resemblance to her paso doble: no rhythm, no beauty, no humour and, above all, no feeling. Mostly she disdains description of any kind, using adjectives only in moments of extremis when she will concede the occasional "pleasant", "tasteful" or (high praise) "competent". The people she admires most in the world are all "competent", except for Pope John Paul II. Her impression of him was one of "immense holiness". Of course none of this would be an insurmountable problem if the bones of her story pulled you along. But this is hardly a tale of derring-do. Widdecombe grew up in the West Country and the far east, where her father worked for the Admiralty. She had an older brother, Malcolm, who later became a vicar; her parents were happily married. After school she read for degrees at Birmingham (Latin) and Oxford (PPE), where she took a third. (Her decision to study for a second undergraduate degree was, incidentally, propelled by nothing more than her own weird snobbery; Oxford turned her down the first time.) It's true she had a boyfriend at Oxford, Colin Maltby. But he's a shadowy figure on the page, and when he dumped her over dinner at a pub-restaurant in Esher it took her only until the following morning to feel relieved. "Years later I was to compare the experience to the loss of the 1997 general election," she writes. "I had been a minister for nearly seven years and the sudden loss of office was painful, but the release from relentless pressure, red boxes and perpetually tired eyes produced something akin to euphoria." I'm not about to patronise Widdecombe by suggesting there is something inherently sad about her single, childless status (there isn't). But it's striking how often she feels the need to emphasise that this is her choice, that she has never felt anything less than fulfilled. Instinct tells you that such prickliness isn't only a response to snide Daily Mail journalists; the spikes surely protect a tender, complicated place that a less gauche and more emotionally able woman might just have been willing to visit. After university she worked at Unilever, and then as a university administrator, a job that better fitted with the finding of a seat. She fought Burnley for the Conservatives first, slashing the Labour majority, and in 1987 she was elected the MP for Maidstone, a seat she held until 2010, when she replaced politics with making silly television programmes. Her career in government (she was minister of state for prisons and, later, shadow home secretary) is well covered in her book, but her account is hardly revelatory. We already know very well what she thought of Michael "Something of the Night" Howard. Ditto naughty, arrogant Michael Portillo. She wishes that Kenneth Clarke had replaced John Major as Conservative leader rather than William Hague, but, honestly, who cares now? Like most MPs, she is utterly delusional when it comes to the political class. "It is a weakness of politicians that, as a breed, they assume everybody knows as much about everything as they do," she writes, a statement so lofty and wrong-headed, I threw her wretched book right across the room. More baffling still is the fact that she seems always to have been broke (in 1991, a creditor even filed a bankruptcy petition against her). People will consider her ministerial salary and all the various expenses an MP is able to claim and wonder that she ever had the gall to tell anyone else how to manage their budget. (When she worked at the Department of Social Security she announced that benefit claimants could save money by shopping at markets.) It can't have been easy, being Ann Widdecombe. When she was elected, there were even fewer women in parliament than now; though she took the Doris Karloff jokes in good part – the cartoons hang on the wall of her Dartmoor retirement bungalow – the jibes must have hurt sometimes. Even so, it's hard to feel kindly towards her. It isn't only the fact that she is determined to be an island; she makes herself so thoroughly dislikable. Towards the end of her book she writes about child abuse in the Catholic church, which she joined after the Anglicans decided to ordain women. She doesn't defend it, exactly, but she thinks it has no more need to apologise than any other institution, and there is a terrible, gloating satisfaction in the way she notes that the BBC – from whence, she insists, some of the "loudest condemnations" of the Catholic church came – has since found itself mired in the Jimmy Savile scandal. In some quarters, one gathers, Widdecombe's woeful performance on Strictly Come Dancing unaccountably won her national treasure status. Luckily, her memoir stands as a corrective to that, even as it seeks to cash in on it. Alas, there are, it seems, aspects of her character more ugly and confused even than her paso doble. Autobiography and memoir Biography Ann Widdecombe Strictly Come Dancing BBC Television Entertainment Conservatives R

Vice All News Time10 June 2013 09:14:43


Hillsborough campaigner Anne Williams's funeral draws crowds

29 April 2013 16:30:31 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

Hundreds line streets of Formby to pay tribute to mother whose fight to get her son's inquest verdict overturned led to fresh hearings Crowds lined the streets of a Merseyside town to bid farewell to Hillsborough campaigner Anne Williams on Monday. Williams, one of the most persistent voices throughout the campaign for justice following the 1989 football stadium disaster, was remembered at a service in Formby. She died aged 62 on Thursday 18 April after a battle with cancer. Scores of people, many wearing Liverpool scarves, gathered in bright sunshine outside Our Lady of Compassion church. A hush fell over the street as the hearse bearing her coffin pulled up. It also contained a wreath of white flowers embellished with red roses that spelled out "Mum". Bystanders watched as the coffin was carried into the church, followed by hundreds of mourners. Anne Williams spent almost half her life campaigning after her 15-year-old son Kevin died in the Hillsborough tragedy. It was her fight to get his inquest verdict of accidental death overturned that is credited with leading to fresh hearings for all 96 supporters who died. Hillsborough disaster Liverpool Liverpool guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time29 April 2013 16:30:31


Hillsborough campaigner Anne Williams dies

18 April 2013 11:45:52 UK headlines

Hillsborough justice campaigner Anne Williams has died after battling cancer.        

Vice All News Time18 April 2013 11:45:52


Justin Bieber on Anne Frank: Five interpretations

15 April 2013 18:25:18 BBC News - UK

Justin Bieber hopes Anne Frank would be a "belieber" - and he wrote it in the visitor's book of the Anne Frank museum. What does this say about him?

Vice All News Time15 April 2013 18:25:18


The Stone Roses' first photographer

13 April 2013 23:57:46 BBC News - UK

Photographer Ian Tilton on his famous Stone Roses shots

Vice All News Time13 April 2013 23:57:46