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Last British 'Great Escaper' tells how he escaped execution

23 March 2014 23:18:40 UK headlines

The last British survivor from the Great Escape tells of his memories of the breakout, his dramatic capture and how he was spared from execution in the tragic aftermath        

Vice All News Time23 March 2014 23:18:40


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How Germany was crucified: Hidden for 100 years, astonishing images that show German soldiers haunted by the spectre of defeat - and paying the ultimate price... as captured by the camera of one of their own brothers-in-arms

09 March 2014 00:49:15 News | Mail Online

These remarkable photos, published for the first time, give a rare and uncensored view of the horrors of the First World War from behind enemy lines.

Vice All News Time09 March 2014 00:49:15


Lost voices of the Western Front: First World War soldiers recall terror of the trenches in unseen footage from the 1960s

07 March 2014 13:34:24 News | Mail Online

Rediscovered footage of Great War veterans talking about their first-hand experiences of the conflict will be shown in the documentary, I Was There: The Great War Interviews, on BBC Two next Friday night.

Vice All News Time07 March 2014 13:34:24


Rediscovered Fonteyn footage to air

14 February 2014 05:09:22 BBC News - UK

Footage of Dame Margot Fonteyn dancing in a long-unseen performance of Sleeping Beauty will feature as part of BBC Two and Four's short ballet season.

Vice All News Time14 February 2014 05:09:22


VIDEO: Rare World War Two footage released

08 February 2014 19:44:01 BBC News - UK

A Derbyshire charity is releasing rare archive footage of its founder in action during World War Two.

Vice All News Time08 February 2014 19:44:01


Dramatic footage of WW2 bomb raid emerges

08 February 2014 15:59:34 UK headlines

Dramatic footage taken from an RAF Lancaster bomber as it swoops over a factory during a Second World War raid is discovered        

Vice All News Time08 February 2014 15:59:34


Dramatic footage of WW2 bomb raid emerges

08 February 2014 13:01:09 UK headlines

Dramatic footage taken from an RAF Lancaster bomber as it swoops over a factory during a Second World War raid is discovered        

Vice All News Time08 February 2014 13:01:09


Airbnb denies it is at war with hotel groups

28 January 2014 07:24:40 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

Chief executive Brian Chesky hits back at claims the internet room-rental service undermines hoteliers, as Airbnb reveals 14,000 hosts use it in the UK        

Vice All News Time28 January 2014 07:24:40


More than 50 executed in Aleppo as rebels turn against each other

09 January 2014 11:34:52 News | Mail Online

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT: An al Qaeda-linked extremist Islamic faction is accused of handcuffing, blindfolding then shooting dead the men from other Islamic groups fighting in the Syrian civil war.

Vice All News Time09 January 2014 11:34:52


More than 50 executed in Aleppo as rebels turn against each other

09 January 2014 00:30:05 News | Mail Online

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES! An al Qaeda-linked extremist Islamic faction is accused of handcuffing, blindfolding then shooting dead the men from other Islamic groups fighting in the Syrian civil war.

Vice All News Time09 January 2014 00:30:05


BBC accused of bias on immigration... by its own political editor: Nick Robinson says Corporation made 'terrible mistakes' by not reflecting public's concerns

06 January 2014 03:11:53 News | Mail Online

Mr Robinson said that during Labour's time in Government, BBC executives feared that an uncensored debate about immigration would stoke racism.

Vice All News Time06 January 2014 03:11:53


Death row in wartime: British Pathe releases harrowing archive footage of executions during conflicts across the world

27 December 2013 03:26:19 News | Mail Online

The man was one of several Germans killed by a US military firing squad just outside the town of Braunschweig, Germany in 1945 because he deemed a spy.

Vice All News Time27 December 2013 03:26:19


Footage shows Lampedusa shipwreck survivors were forced to strip naked

18 December 2013 18:59:07 News | Mail Online

In scenes reminiscent of World War Two concentration camps, the footage (pictured) obtained by Italian television shows migrants at the detention centre on the EU’s southern-most landfall, standing naked in the open air, while waiting to be sprayed for scabies.

Vice All News Time18 December 2013 18:59:07


Wife of Royal Marine jailed for executing Taliban insurgent says "He is NOT a murderer"

14 December 2013 14:12:56 mirror - News

Claire Blackman said her husband, who was sentenced to a 10-year minimum life term, shot the fighter in a war zone and should not be compared to a common killer

Vice All News Time14 December 2013 14:12:56


Facebook defends beheadings footage

19 November 2013 13:51:19 BBC News - UK

Facebook will continue to allow users to show footage of beheadings if it is posted in "the right context" and does not "glorify" violence, MPs hear.

Vice All News Time19 November 2013 13:51:19


BBC to release Hillsborough footage

07 October 2013 14:28:18 BBC News - UK

The BBC is to release previously unseen footage from the Hillsborough disaster to next year's inquests.

Vice All News Time07 October 2013 14:28:18


BBC in 'civil war' over generous pay-offs

09 September 2013 21:46:31 Politics News - UK Politics

The BBC was last night accused of "running away" from its responsibilities and descending into "civil war" with its ruling body after seven serving and former executives sought to shift the blame for over-generous pay-offs.        

Vice All News Time09 September 2013 21:46:31


Admiral avoids price war

30 August 2013 03:34:14 Financials

Insurer’s chief executive says group has deliberately avoided growing in the UK as rivals cut premiums in the hope a government crackdown on whiplash

Vice Finance Time30 August 2013 03:34:14


Game of Thrones 'as good as Tolstoy', says ITV executive Peter Fincham

24 August 2013 16:10:22 News | Mail Online

In comments likely to infuriate teachers and literature lovers across Britain, the network’s director of television, Peter Fincham, claims Game of Thrones is the equal of Leo Tolstoy’s novel War and Peace.

Vice All News Time24 August 2013 16:10:22


Game of Thrones 'is as good as Tolstoy', says top ITV executive

24 August 2013 05:10:11 News | Mail Online

In comments likely to infuriate teachers and literature lovers across Britain, the network’s director of television, Peter Fincham, claims Game of Thrones is the equal of Leo Tolstoy’s novel War and Peace.

Vice All News Time24 August 2013 05:10:11


Incredible footage reveals how French World War Two prisoners secretly filmed life in their POW camp with tiny camera hidden in a hollowed out dictionary

01 August 2013 03:45:34 News | Mail Online

Prisoners at the Oflag 17a camp in Austria, close to the Czechoslovakian border, smuggled parts for the camera into the camp in sausages before using it to record their own great escape.

Vice All News Time01 August 2013 03:45:34


BBC accused of acting like a 'cosy cartel' after handing £500,000 pay-off to executive who quit in disgrace over doctored footage of the Queen

26 July 2013 05:18:50 News | Mail Online

Peter Fincham (pictured), who ran BBC1 for two years, wrongly claimed a trailer showed the monarch storming out of a 2007 photo shoot with American photographer Annie Leibovitz.

Vice All News Time26 July 2013 05:18:50


Black and white footage reveals Duchess of Cambridge's great-great-great uncle greeting royalty

10 July 2013 13:00:29 News | Mail Online

British Pathe footage shows Kate's ancestor Sir Charles Lupton greeting Princess Mary in 1927 and a newsreel taken during the First World War features him visiting troops in the Yorkshire Dales (pictured in chain).

Vice All News Time10 July 2013 13:00:29


Monsters U beats World War Z at US box office

24 June 2013 13:41:11 Film | theguardian.com

Brad Pitt zombie flick manages second place despite history of production troubles, while Man of Steel holds third to consolidate its blockbuster status Monsters University delivered an emphatic performance to lead the North American charts with $82m over the weekend as the Pixar prequel scored the company's second biggest opening behind the $110.3m set by Toy Story in 2010. This left Superman and the zombies to slug it out for second place. The accolade went to World War Z thanks to $66m – a new opening record for Brad Pitt. Last year's gripes and grumbles about delays and overspends on Paramount's zombie action thriller seem fairly distant now as the movie arrived in style, grossing a further $45.8m or so outside North America to propel the global running total to an early $111.8m. It should surge past $200m in a week and will keep on growing with strong holdovers expected in the US and plenty of major international territories to come. World War Z is off to a great start but according to received wisdom it needs to gross around $500m worldwide to break even. That's because the movie reportedly cost more than $200m to make after studio executives baulked at the original ending, which was deemed to be too abrupt and did not lend itself to a sequel. They sanctioned a major rewrite from Star Trek Into Darkness screenwriter Damon Lindelof and 40 minutes of new footage. Throw in rumours of "creative differences" between Pitt (who also produced World War Z) and director Marc Forster and it's no wonder the release date was pulled back from December 2012. Studio executives will learn a lot from this experience, not least how fickle the Hollywood press can be. There was a spate of published jeremiads about the movie's prospects last year as people who had not seen a second of footage wrote off its chances. Now those very same outlets are cooing and fussing over a potential blockbuster. Man of Steel is playing well for Warner Bros and crossed $200m in its second weekend after adding $41.2m to rank number three. The reboot has amassed more than $393m worldwide and is a bona fide summer smash thanks to the dedicated core of superhero fans. Monsters University's appeal is broader still and as the classic four-quadrant tentpole movie it appeals to young and old, male and female alike. They certainly turned in numbers and are expected to do so again next week. North American top 10, Jun 21-23 2013 1. Monsters University $82m 2. World War Z $66m 3. Man of Steel $41.2m. Total: $210m 4. This is the End $13m. Total: $57.8m 5. Now You See Me $7.9m. Total: $94.5m 6. Fast & Furious 6 $4.7m. Total: $228.4m 7. The Internship $3.4m. Total: $38.4m 8. The Purge $3.4m. Total: $59.4m 9. Star Trek Into Darkness $3m. Total: $216.6m 10. Iron Man 3 $2.2m. Total: $403.1m Brad Pitt Pixar Animation Walt Disney Company Superman Paramount Pictures Marc Forster Christopher Nolan Film industry Jeremy Kay guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time24 June 2013 13:41:11


The war on undernutrition

05 June 2013 12:14:59 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Sponsored feature : Undernutrition is one of the most neglected development issues. Sue George reports on how business and science are taking up the challenge Shocking television images of starving people, saved from death by humanitarian food drops, have become all too common over the past few decades. But there are many children across the developing world who are not starving or even hungry, yet they are struggling to get the nutritious food they need to grow properly. There is increasing agreement that undernutrition is one of the most neglected issues in global development. In 2011, 165 million children across the world were reckoned to be too short for their age, or "stunted", a condition caused by under nutrition. It is therefore essential that it be tackled, to ensure individuals not only survive but thrive. The issue of how to combat undernutrition was the subject of a roundtable event hosted by the Guardian, in association with the Children's Investment Fund Foundation (Ciff). Ciff is an independent philanthropic organisation that seeks to improve the lives of children in developing countries through large-scale, sustainable changes. The event attracted a range of scientists, development specialists and policymakers, including Alan Duncan, minister of state for international development. The roundtable was told that on 8 June, the governments of the UK and Brazil, together with Ciff, would be co-hosting a high-level international meeting in London entitled Nutrition for Growth: Beating Hunger through Business and Science. The event – which will mark the launch of a eight-year global effort to tackle undernutrition – will bring together business leaders, scientists, governments and civil society. Its aim is to extract from each party the necessary commitments to tackle undernutrition and enable people and nations to prosper. Development goals To achieve the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) – which aims to reduce the 1990 child mortality rate by two thirds by 2015 – undernutrition in children needs to be addressed urgently. The World Health Organisation wants to reduce the number of stunted children in the world by 70 million by 2025, the goal for the 8 June summit is to ensure this target is on track by 2020. Everyone at the roundtable agreed that urgent action was needed to speed up this reduction. Jamie Cooper-Hohn, Ciff's president, pointed out that nutrition was usually discussed separately from other development issues that might affect it. "Nutrition hasn't been on anyone's radar," she said. "While there's no single cause of child mortality we know that undernutrition underlies more than 35% of child deaths globally." Alan Duncan told participants about the government's commitment to the 8 June meeting, and his hopes that this would be an opportunity to expand global thinking around the nutrition agenda. "The first 1,000 days [of a child's life starting after conception] are crucial for brain development and growth. That window affects the entire life chances of an individual," he said. Duncan said he was fully aware that the global financial crisis was having an impact on funding opportunities across the board, but was adamant that more money was needed. "We want national commitments [from governments at the 8 June event] but we also hope for a greater collective awareness of the nature of problem and the best steps that can be taken to address it." There are huge economic consequences for Africa and Asia, stressed Cooper-Hohn. "By eliminating undernutrition we would boost wages by up to 50% and make children 33% more likely to escape poverty as adults," she said. Duncan was one of many participants to stress the interconnectedness of the private sector, civil society and government. To tackle undernutrition a "whole society" approach is required – but what specific roles should each sector assume? Lawrence Haddad, nutritionist and director of the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, said it will not be easy. "Scaling up this movement brings in government, NGOs, science, business. This is difficult to co-ordinate. Our next challenge is how to get all the parts moving in concert." He was enthusiastic about the work of the Department for International Development (DfID). "I had been critical of the international ambition of donors, but DfID has been fantastic on nutrition. It is in the group that everyone looks to." David Bull, executive director of Unicef UK and on the board of the Enough Food For Everyone IF Campaign, stressed the importance of civil society in holding governments to account on nutrition. "The role of civil society is to keep pressing on this to make sure the scandal of chronic undernutrition is on the minds of populations in donor countries and leaders in developing countries and they aren't allowed to forget it. We are nearly there with polio, we did it with smallpox, and we can do it with chronic undernutrition of children." The private sector – involving companies of all sizes, from multinationals to hyper-local – is also significant. Herman Betten, communications director, sponsoring and advocacy at DSM – a global science-based company active in health nutrition and materials – believes business has a key role to play. "We care about 'people, planet and profit'. We believe we possess the ability to help others solve the world's greatest issues," he said. The role of the public sector, however, cannot be underestimated. Steve Wiggins of the Overseas Development Institute pointed out that, while the role of business was very important, a "decent, functioning public sector" capable of providing clean water, primary healthcare and rural roads was an integral weapon in the war against undernutrition. Noel Marie Zagre, regional nutrition adviser for East and Southern Africa at Unicef, also pointed out the key role of developing-world governments. "We need strong leadership from governments to help these countries," he said. Participants heard that the issue of undernutrition was complex, and involved not just adequate food but good health and care. "Wash" – water, sanitation and hygiene – projects are also essential in the prevention of undernutrition because they help prevent the spread of diarrhoea, which can lead to undernutrition. Undernutrition, in turn, makes many other illnesses more likely. Bull gave the example of a clinic in Kampala, Uganda he had visited at which prenatal care, breast-feeding support and advice, child immunisations, growth monitoring, food and hygiene education, treatment of diarrhoea and HIV testing were all available. "All you need to do is scale-up that intervention and you really can make a difference," he said. He also mentioned another link in the chain – the need for exclusive breast-feeding up to the age of six months. Private companies could actively do harm here – by selling infant formula, for example – and pro-breast-feeding messages were needed to counteract that, he said. Usable data One thing stressed by several part

Vice All News Time05 June 2013 12:14:59


Executed as they waited on a pavement kerb: Terrifying assassination video of three men by 'Islamist rebels' shows new front in Syrian propaganda war

17 May 2013 00:27:42 News | Mail Online

The footage, filmed in the northern city of Raqqa, purportedly shows Islamist rebels shooting dead government soldiers.

Vice All News Time17 May 2013 00:27:42


Amanda Berry: Listen to Charles Ramsey's full uncensored 911 call made after Amanda Berry rescue

08 May 2013 17:14:48 mirror - News

Gina DeJesus, Michelle Knight and Amanda Berry and her six-year-old daughter fled the house in Cleveland, Ohio

Vice All News Time08 May 2013 17:14:48


World War Z: is Brad Pitt making the most expensive disaster movie of all time?

03 May 2013 12:43:44 Film | theguardian.com

The negative hype surrounding Brad Pitt's zombie epic World War Z is getting worse all the time, with news of rewrites, reshoots and a budget that has ballooned above $400m Reading this on mobile? Click here to view video Anyone who has read Max Brooks's grippingly detailed science fiction novel – or even better, listened to the superb audiobook – will probably have a pretty good idea what kind of movie Brad Pitt originally envisaged when he bought the screen rights to World War Z in 2007. Delivered as a series of oral histories straight from the lips of survivors of the zombie apocalypse, the book presents a steady, nagging creep of horrifying reportage from across the world. It's like a set of zombie-infested episodes from Radio Four's From Our Own Correspondent, or Studs Terkel's vivid and entrancing An Oral History of World War Two rewritten by George A Romero. One can imagine Steven Soderbergh directing a border-straddling ensemble piece in the style of Traffic or Contagion, with zombies replacing drugs and infection as the dramatic active ingredient. Pitt is said to have initially imagined a zombie apocalypse movie with a genuinely geopolitical flavour. At some point in time, it appears he had one: those who have read Changeling screenwriter JM Straczynski's initial draft of the script , say it had the potential to catapult the genre into awards season territory. Since 2008, when that screenplay leaked, matters have taken such a turn for the worse that Pitt must surely be starting to regret ever naming his production company Plan B. First Straczynski's script was jettisoned for failing to hit the necessary action tentpole beats, with The Kingdom's Matthew Michael Carnahan brought in to do a complete rewrite. Then, after the shoot finally completed last year, Pitt and his team decided (with the help of Lost's Damon Lindelof) that the entire 40-minute-long third act would need to be reshot and replaced at vast cost. There are also rumours that Pitt and director Marc Forster refused to talk to each other on set by the end of production. As we head inexorably towards the film's 21 June release, some reports suggest the budget has ballooned to more than $400m, which would make World War Z the most expensive film of all time. So negative has the publicity surrounding Pitt's movie been thus far that the film's producers appear to have just about given up trying to stem the flow of negative hype. A recent Vanity Fair article on the star's "epic struggle" to make World War Z delved extensively into the movie's shortcomings, candidly exposing the collective myopia of a creative team that apparently had little experience of big-budget, spectacle-heavy film-making prior to entering production. (At one point, an entire day of filming was lost because the caterers didn't have enough food to feed 750 extras, and later on producers discovered a cache of undocumented unpaid bills from a Malta shoot that added considerably to budget costs.) Lindelof reveals he was called in and asked to give his opinion on World War Z's ending, which pretty much everyone involved admitted did not work. "The thing we really need right now is someone who is not burdened by all the history that this thing is inheriting, who can see what we've got and tell us how to get to where we need to get," Pitt apparently told the screenwriter. Lindelof then gave producers two options: a rewrite of existing material to make it work better in terms of "emotional stakes and plot logic, and all that", or a complete rewrite which would require dumping footage that had already been shot. "I didn't think anyone was going to say, 'Let's throw it out and try something else,'" he admits. But so upset were executives with the previous finale that they agreed to the screenwriter's plan B with little argument. Reading this on mobile? Click here to view video The new version is ironically said to be less spectacular, but with more of the sense of emotional relief supposedly required to send cinemagoers contentedly out into the night. Carnahan's version is said to have seen Pitt travelling to Russia to free legions of slaves, who he enlists to destroy the zombie threat with lobotomising sheaths that take off their heads. But it was too grim and violent for the PG-13 film Paramount insisted on and cast Pitt in a negative light as a savage, zombie-killing warrior leader. Worse still, it failed to reunite our hero with his family (and therefore felt hollow and bleak). What's apparent here is that somewhere along the way, Pitt simply ended up optioning the wrong novel. Brooks's intelligent alternative history beautifully posits the collective inability of global political administrations to function in the face of an entirely unexpected threat, and the appalling ramifications of their failure on ordinary individuals from soldiers to doctors to priests. It's a satire on the sloth-like clumsiness of even the most sophisticated forms of government that's notable for its lack of a traditional Hollywood-style central figure. The idea that one man could make such a big difference in the face of worldwide meltdown, at least in the traditional action-hero sense, is laughable to anyone who has read it. And yet, in the trailers for World War Z it's apparent that everyone's favourite Chanel No 5 advocate is being hyped up to be the saviour of humanity. Hollywood used to have a history of making a mess out of supposedly "unfilmable" books, but in recent years it has become apparent that audiences are more than willing to see traditional filmic narrative techniques jettisoned if it means telling the story they have come to know and love. Stories don't always need to be curtailed, simplified and souped up for the big screen, at least not so ham-fistedly that nothing is left of the book's original spirit. With its elegant documentary-style approach, Brooks's novel reignited the sagging zombie genre in the literary world, so it's incredibly disappointing that the movie adaptation looks unlikely to do the same for its celluloid equivalent. The only consolation might be that if World War Z does go down in flames, Heaven's Gate-style, it could serve as a warning to studios that butchering much-loved material for the sake of popcorn kicks rarely ends in anything but misery for all concerned. Brad Pitt Zombies Science

Vice All News Time03 May 2013 12:43:44


UK film executives charged with tax fraud of £125m

01 May 2013 15:24:30 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

The Crown Prosecution Service has confirmed five people will be charged over an alleged tax relief scheme in the film industry Five members of the British film industry are to go on trial for tax fraud after allegedly depriving the UK treasury of around £125m ($194m). The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) says the five men abused a tax relief scheme aimed at helping movie production. They are due to appear before Birmingham Magistrates' Court on 18 June, following an investigation by HM Revenue and Customs. CPS deputy head of fraud Andrew Penhale said: "It is alleged that, between 1 January 2002 and 11 July 2011, a tax relief that allows investors in the British film industry to offset losses against other tax liabilities was abused and dishonestly marketed in order to cheat the public revenue. "The evidence suggests that the value of allowable losses was falsified, that there was a conspiracy to defraud investors and that documents were falsified for accounting purposes. Keith Hayley, Robert Bevan, Charles Savill, Cyril Mégret and Norman Leighton will each face three charges: conspiracy to cheat the public revenue, conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to falsify documents." The men are alleged to have abused a tax relief scheme which was shut down by the government due to a number of instances of suspected exploitation by middlemen and tax consultants. It has now been replaced by a system which provides tax relief directly to film-makers and investors. None of the accused men has yet made any public comment on the charges. In March, four men and one woman were jailed for their part in a £2.8m VAT and film tax credits scam involving a fake film, Landscape of Lies . Tax inspectors were told that A-listers from Hollywood were starring in a £19.6m production that would be shot in the UK. However, the movie was never made and the only footage shot was seven minutes of "completely unusable quality" filmed in a flat, which cost just £5,000. Film industry HMRC United States Ben Child guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice Bussines Time01 May 2013 15:24:30


UK film executives charged with tax fraud

01 May 2013 15:18:54 Film | theguardian.com

The Crown Prosecution Service has confirmed five people will be charged over an alleged tax relief scheme in the film industry Five members of the British film industry are to go on trial for tax fraud after allegedly depriving the UK treasury of around £125m ($194m). The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) says the five men abused a tax relief scheme aimed at helping movie production. They are due to appear before Birmingham Magistrates' Court on 18 June, following an investigation by HM Revenue and Customs. CPS deputy head of fraud Andrew Penhale said: "It is alleged that, between 1 January 2002 and 11 July 2011, a tax relief that allows investors in the British film industry to offset losses against other tax liabilities was abused and dishonestly marketed in order to cheat the public revenue. "The evidence suggests that the value of allowable losses was falsified, that there was a conspiracy to defraud investors and that documents were falsified for accounting purposes. Keith Hayley, Robert Bevan, Charles Savill, Cyril Mégret and Norman Leighton will each face three charges: conspiracy to cheat the public revenue, conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to falsify documents." The men are alleged to have abused a tax relief scheme which was shut down by the government due to a number of instances of suspected exploitation by middlemen and tax consultants. It has now been replaced by a system which provides tax relief directly to film-makers and investors. None of the accused men has yet made any public comment on the charges. In March, four men and one woman were jailed for their part in a £2.8m VAT and film tax credits scam involving a fake film, Landscape of Lies . Tax inspectors were told that A-listers from Hollywood were starring in a £19.6m production that would be shot in the UK. However, the movie was never made and the only footage shot was seven minutes of "completely unusable quality" filmed in a flat, which cost just £5,000. Film industry HMRC United States Ben Child guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time01 May 2013 15:18:54