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Do Chelsea have the strongest U23 squad in the world?

16 July 2014 15:28:31 mirror - Sport

With Filipe Luís signing, Chelsea keep adding world-class players to their squad. But do they already have the strongest bunch of U23s in the world?

Vice Sport Time16 July 2014 15:28:31


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Britain sets new record for world's strongest beer at almost 70% proof

05 July 2014 23:46:00 mirror - News

The Snake Venom beer is stronger than most spirits and costs £50 per bottle

Vice All News Time05 July 2014 23:46:00


World Cup's sexiest TV presenters working in Brazil - and none are Adrian Chiles

27 June 2014 14:16:40 mirror - Sport

Worn-out Adrian Chiles is a far cry from the wealth of good-looking TV presenters that can be found at this year's World Cup - as photos of sexy presenters go viral

Vice Sport Time27 June 2014 14:16:40


Why Hang Seng is the world's strongest bank

16 June 2014 11:29:15 Finance - Business news and market updates - The Telegraph

A look into the humble beginnings of one of the world's most powerful banks

Vice All News Time16 June 2014 11:29:15


'England has "one of the strongest attacks in the World Cup" says Italy coach'

15 June 2014 05:20:56 mirror - Sport

Cesare Prandelli said the new Three Lions team are a vast improvement on past sides, and that he was proud his players beat them in 2-1 clash

Vice Sport Time15 June 2014 05:20:56


Mortgage lenders have strongest February in six years

20 March 2014 14:05:09 Finance - Business news and market updates - The Telegraph

Home loans worth £15bn were handed out last month, a 43pc rise on February 2013        

Vice Finance Time20 March 2014 14:05:09


Mortgage lenders post strongest February in six years

20 March 2014 13:44:40 Finance - Business news and market updates - The Telegraph

Home loans worth £15bn were handed out last month, a 43pc rise on February 2013        

Vice Finance Time20 March 2014 13:44:40


Arsenal v Bayern Munich: How German giants became the strongest club in the world

19 February 2014 08:13:47 Sport

Special Report: Jeremy Wilson charts growth of Bayern Munich, a club now rightly considered to be best team on the planet        

Vice All News Time19 February 2014 08:13:47


Arsenal v Bayern Munich: How German giants became the strongest club in the world

19 February 2014 08:13:16 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Special Report: Jeremy Wilson charts growth of Bayern Munich, a club now rightly considered to be best team on the planet        

Vice All News Time19 February 2014 08:13:16


We all know Bill Clinton has the world's strongest aphrodisiac - POWER

06 February 2014 02:07:47 mirror - News

Alison Phillips says his florid complexion, lumpy frame and greying hair would have paled into insignificance compared to towering intellect and incredible charisma

Vice All News Time06 February 2014 02:07:47


Britain's recovery 'strongest in world'

13 November 2013 23:05:31 UK headlines

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney says that after years of weak growth, the economic recovery has "finally taken hold"        

Vice All News Time13 November 2013 23:05:31


Britain's recovery 'strongest in world'

13 November 2013 22:30:25 Finance - Business news and market updates - The Telegraph

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney says that after years of weak growth, the economic recovery has "finally taken hold"        

Vice Finance Time13 November 2013 22:30:25


Woman's Hour presenter Jane Garvey claims it is still a man's media world

29 October 2013 17:18:16 News | Mail Online

The 49-year-old has revealed that she wasn't surprised about the 'kerfuffle' surrounding the appointment of the two female presenters to theToday Show.

Vice All News Time29 October 2013 17:18:16


Gillingham Adebayo Akinfenwa says he's officially the strongest player in the world

20 September 2013 12:21:44 Football | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Football Time20 September 2013 12:21:44


Gillingham Adebayo Akinfenwa says he's officially the strongest player in the world

20 September 2013 11:48:45 Sport | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 11:48:45


I'm officially the strongest player in the world and it's business as usual at Gillingham - Adebayo Akinfenwa

20 September 2013 02:39:48 Football | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Football Time20 September 2013 02:39:48


I'm officially the strongest player in the world and it's business as usual at Gillingham - Adebayo Akinfenwa

20 September 2013 02:37:55 Sport | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 02:37:55


German economy grows at strongest pace in a year

23 August 2013 13:18:54 Finance - Business news and market updates - The Telegraph

Stronger domestic demand drove the strongest German quarterly expansion in more than a year in the second quarter, fuelling optimism Europe's largest economy will outperform in 2013 and support the nascent eurozone recovery.        

Vice Finance Time23 August 2013 13:18:54


A present for the royal baby: booties or cigarettes?

23 July 2013 17:59:14 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

How Samantha Cameron might have been advised to welcome the birth of the Prince of Cambridge Well TBH Mr Cobber would not totally be my first choice for present input, as in I thought our holy bible in blond pigskin would work, but Dave says there is no point having the world's top communications genius researching pornography in our kitchen if we do not take his advice? So Mr Cobber goes Dave, freshen Lynton's pint mate, censoring doesn't half bring on a thirst, now are you off your freaking pommie head Sabrina, trust me, white van men will not give you a XXXX for a fricking bible but in focus groups a pack of baby's first smokes outperforms booties by 35% as a ripper gift for a bouncing boy, I'm like, are you SURE? He's like, listen to the Wizard of Oz, all the surveys prove there is no known mechanism that links teaching newborns to inhale and cancer death rates, the choice is yours, Lucky Strikes or Rothmans? So I'm like, OMG, I am not sure Mr Cobber, are you sure a pampering box plus teddy & artisan muffins might not be more appropriate, he's like, oh you want cute, trust Crosby Textor's umatched pedigree in market research & go for nutritious alcopops, anyone asks, tell them reliable government-run surveys show no evidence that spirituous beverages in feeding bottles have any impact on under-age drinking, a ban will only punish the innocent babes who can't afford to buy alcohol for themselves, poor little bastards, brings a tear to Lynton's eye to think of it, now fetch us a beer Sabrina & get me the nailclippers while you're it, there's one here almost dropping off. So just when I am getting hopelessly confused Mummy rings, literally I have never heard her so excited, going darling, if babies are having a moment would it not be actually DISLOYAL not to do a very respectful promotion, nothing tacky or Middleton, just a tray chic, tiny crown over the logo plus something like "A Nursery Fit for a Prince" could shift the discontinued lines from last Christmas? So I'm like, ha, now it is my turn to lecture you Mr Cobber, in OUR country nothing says "welcome royal baby" more than one of Mummy's faux-shagreen OKA waste bins in iconic taupe, £115, job done :))) Samantha Cameron The Duchess of Cambridge Monarchy Catherine Bennett guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time23 July 2013 17:59:14


Mishal Husain … a calm, intelligent presenter | Simon Hoggart

19 July 2013 16:52:24 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Mishal Husain seems unfazed, while other presenters appear close to panic – in case they have to improvise ✒I am delighted that Mishal Husain is to join the Today programme. I've been interviewed by her once or twice on the BBC news channel, and it's obvious that she is captivatingly intelligent and beautiful. But she also exudes a kind of calm. Some presenters give the impression they are close to panic, perhaps because you might say something that's not in their briefing, so they would have to improvise, or someone has whispered something scary in their earpiece. But Mishal exudes calm rationality and seems unfazed by anything. ✒It was the annual Downing Street summer party for the press was this week, and I learned that David Cameron is scared by the prospect of prime minister's questions for a day or a day and a half before each session. Not as much as Tony Blair, who was reduced weekly to a wobbling jelly, but still enough to be deeply relieved when it's over. Perhaps that's why he is so aggressive. I normally wouldn't mention a politician's children, but all three of the Cameron kids were rushing round the garden in front of the hacks, possibly trying to get their father's attention. At one point the PM had to break off to rescue Nancy, who was climbing a dangerous looking tree. It was very sweet. On my way out I passed the photos of ancient cabinets, including Neville Chamberlain's. I cannot imagine having a conversation with Lord Halifax which he suddenly broke off, say, to pull a little girl out of a paddling pool. ✒No call from Barry Cryer this week, but I bumped into an friend of his and he reminded me of a favourite gag. The Great Superbo turns up at the music hall for an audition, dragging behind him an enormous steamer trunk. His act consists of hitting his head with a hammer, which forces out different notes from his mouth. He can perform many numbers, including God Save The King and My Old Man. The theatre manager loves it. "Great act," he says, "but what's in the trunk?" "Paracetamol." ✒We supporters of Scottish independence have been buoyed by Andrew Marr's article in the latest Prospect magazine. Welcome back, Andy! He believes the result will be closer than the pundits and polls predict. We are also pondering the electoral outcome of the allegedly racist Irn Bru ad. (Irn Bru is the vile fizzy drink that sells 200 million litres a year in the UK.) It shows the horror of a Scottish father when his daughter brings home a young Cockney with a bulldog, which farts on the saltire-patterned rug. One complainant asked what the reaction would have been if the boyfriend had been black or Muslim rather than white English. The Advertising Standards Authority rejected the complaints, implying, I suppose, that we are jolly good friends who can tease each other. Actually I think it's rather good. Some Scots seem to imagine that England is populated entirely by chinless Hoorays in striped blazers, who think of Scotland only as a gigantic grouse moor studded with castles, so it's excellent that Irn Bru is showing them a slightly more accurate picture. ✒A friend of mine recently joined Richard Stilgoe – the famous librettist – for part of his Voyage Around Battersea Power Station, which included travelling along the Thames and the length of the south coast. As they passed Hove, the genteel twin of Brighton, Stilgoe remarked that there were very few songs that could not be improved by inserting the word "Hove" for "love". As in, I'm In The Mood for Hove, Hove Is All Around, Bye Bye Hove, Hove Is The Sweetest Thing. Obviously it only works where "love" is a noun; Hove, Hove Me Do, for example, would just be silly. I wonder if the idea works with any other place names? ✒We seem to be in a new phase the language being Americanised. I suspect it is due to long running TV series and all those box sets of, say, The West Wing. I have no particular objection, but merely note that "railway station", which used to be shortened to "station" now always seems to be "train station". This is to differentiate from "bus station", which is the more important in most American cities. We pick up the "tab" now instead of the bill. Increasingly British people are following the song by saying "ee-ther" and "nee-ther" instead of "eye-ther" and "nye-ther". We now "meet with" people, the "with" being largely redundant, though I suppose it implies a purposeful conversation, as opposed to "I met Jim in the street." Organisations are "headed up by" these days instead of being simply headed by. And why do we say, "tell me about it" when what we actually mean is "don't tell me about it"? "The traffic was awful"; "I had the same experience, so you've no need to describe yours…" is what we're trying to say. Mind you it works both ways. "Shagging" in the States used to mean informal baseball practice. Less so now, I believe. ✒ I went into hospital this week for a routine blood check, and asked the new phlebotomist where he came from. "Transylvania," he said cheerily, and indeed his badge showed a Romanian name. "It's a very appropriate job for me," he added. I said I was glad that he used hypodermics rather than teeth to extract the blood. And added that I'd always assumed that they liked young virgins, and I am neither. "Oh, we're branching out now," he replied. I said I was glad I hadn't had garlic for lunch, and went on my way reflecting on non-sexist, inclusive vampires. ✒The Open golf is on BBC, thank heavens, so Peter Alliss is back! I don't have time to watch it all, so if you catch any of the great man's amazing throwaway remarks, I'd be delighted to learn them. Mishal Husain Andrew Marr BBC David Cameron Simon Hoggart guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds  

Vice All News Time19 July 2013 16:52:24


Lions 2013: Guardian writers present their awards for the Australia tour

08 July 2013 16:27:18 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Leigh Halfpenny is the player of the tour but where was the best match-day atmosphere and who produced the best quote? Best player 1. Leigh Halfpenny. 2. Alun Wyn Jones 3. Alex Corbisiero. Halfpenny – or "Pence" to his team-mates – was inch-perfect from start to finish. Jones led by superb example in the final Test and Corbisiero made the crucial scrum difference. Will Genia, Israel Folau and James Horwill were the Wallabies mainstays. Robert Kitson 1 Leigh Halfpenny. Kicked like a mule and bit like a crocodile. Played every minute of every Test, broke the records for most points scored by a Lions player in a series and a single match, and set up two wonderful tries. 2 Sam Warburton. The heart and soul of the team. Turned in one of the finest 70-minute spells in history in the second Test. He signed so many autographs that it is a wonder his wrist isn't knackered, too. 3 George North. Another man who played in every minute of each Test. He became the talisman of the team. Scored two sparkling tries in the first and second Tests. Andy Bull Leigh Halfpenny is close to the complete player, but that was known before the tour. Jonathan Davies finished it a more mature and rounded player than when he started, an outside-centre with a range of skills. Then take your pick. George North, Alun Wyn Jones, Tom Youngs and Alex Corbisiero stood out and Sam Warburton's display in the second Test was almost superhuman. For Australia, Will Genia, Israel Folau and Ben Mowen. Paul Rees Best try George North, v Australia, first Test, Brisbane. Power, pace and elusiveness are the holy trinity of attributes for any three-quarter and North has them all. The young Welshman's solo slalom from 60 metres out at Suncorp was an absolute ripper. RK Israel Folau's first in Brisbane, if only for the wonderful work of Will Genia in the build-up. He took a quick tap penalty and turned the defence inside-out with two brilliant dummies, and then had the wit to send through that little grubber. AB Leigh Halfpenny's first try against the Waratahs was sublime, the Jonathans, Sexton and Davies, combining sublimely, thinner slices of red meat with a piquant sauce. PR Best game Third Test in Sydney. Hard to look beyond the moment the Lions finally produced the performance which earned them a first series win for 16 years. The first Test was as dramatic as they come and the first half of the Queensland Reds game was tremendous entertainment. RK It's too hard to split the three Tests. The first was the most exciting, the second the most gripping, and the third saw one of the most extraordinary team performances in memory. AB The first Test for the way it oscillated, the battles, the duel between North and Folau and Kurtley Beale's failure to cope with the pressure of the moment. What happened to Australia's mental hardness? PR Champagne moment Folau's change of pace to score his outstanding try in Brisbane. He will score plenty more if he stays in union for any length of time. RK North's collision with Israel Folau in the second Test, when he hoisted the Wallabies wing up on his shoulder as though he were a bad tempered bairn who needed to have his bottom smacked before being carried upstairs to an early bed. AB Genia's break for Folau's first try in Brisbane. PR Biggest let-down James O'Connor. Not much evidence to suggest the talented, self-confident youngster is a better all-round fly-half than Quade Cooper. Even his provincial side the Rebels have now decided they are better off without him. RK The quality of the opposition in some of the early tour games, though the Wallabies played well enough in the Tests they could justify keeping their best players back from those matches. AB Australia's tight five, again. PR Best match-day atmosphere The tension and anticipation before the second Test in Melbourne was remarkable but Brisbane's Suncorp Stadium remains the most atmospheric rugby stadium in Australia. RK The final 10 minutes in Sydney, when 30,000 Lions fans rose to their feet to wave goodbye to all the Australians who were tripping over each other in their rush for the exits. AB It came after the final Test; the train ride back into Sydney on Saturday night, Lions fans roaring. PR Favourite thing(s) about Australia 1) Sydney Harbour 2) The MCG 3) Richie Benaud. RK To take one thing at random from very many, the willingness of their players to front up after every mistake and slip-up on and off the pitch. Made a refreshing contrast with the way sports stars are cosseted in England. AB The weather, Brisbane, cheap mobiles. PR Best quote Press conference question to Warren Gatland the day after the final Test: "I know it's late in the day, Warren, but when is Jonny Wilkinson flying out?" RK "Sometimes you have to put your balls on the line." Warren Gatland sums up his approach to coaching. AB "It was not quite what I have been reading." History student Alex Corbisiero asked whether Graham Rowntree's admitted "fucking medieval" rant after the defeat to the Brumbies resembled anything he had come across in his studies. PR Strangest sight The large python asleep in the tree yards from our hotel in Noosa unnerved one or two colleagues. RK Leigh Halfpenny in a lift at 11am on Sunday morning, wearing a Wallabies shirt and leading Mike Phillips, Jon Davies and three 10-year-old kids in a rendition of One Direction's What Makes You Beautiful. AB Chris Pollock not blowing for a penalty at a breakdown in Brisbane. PR Unsung heroes The Lions medical staff. How they managed to get Tommy Bowe, Jamie Roberts and George North back on the field as swiftly as they did was remarkable. RK Adam Jones played a much bigger role in it all than many seem to realise. Otherwise Karl Schubert, the media manager who shepherded 50 British and Irish hacks around Australia for six weeks. He'd have had an easier time herding a pack of dingos. AB The Lions' logistics team. PR One word to describe Warren Gatland Winner. RK Underestimated. AB Single-minded. PR Smartest initiative The golden pith helmets doled out by the Australian Rugby Union did slightly dilute the sea of red-shirted Lions fans. RK The Lions management realised that they were on the right track in 2009 tour despite the fact they lost that series, and decided that they didn't need to do anything much more than tinker with that format for this tour. AB Getting out of Hong Kong. PR Who will fail to qualify from their RWC2015 pool – Wales, England o

Vice All News Time08 July 2013 16:27:18


The subversive world of online drug dealing presents its own problems | Mike Power

01 July 2013 20:05:44 Politics news, UK and world political comment and analysis | theguardian.com

Encrypted websites selling illegal drugs may render prohibition obsolete, but their profit-driven nature could be just as harmful A nameless admin at Atlantis, a website selling everything from magic mushrooms to marijuana to crack cocaine, posted an advert on YouTube last week. The video was swiftly taken down, but not before about 40,000 people had seen it, copied down the strange URL and gone off to investigate. It's part of a bold new marketing campaign to allow people to easily buy illegal drugs, wherever they are in the world. Whether that's a good or bad thing is debatable. Atlantis is a competitor to the Silk Road, an underground online market where drugs are bought and sold openly, sent to users under plain wrap in the mail. But where the Silk Road hides and does not share its URL very widely, Atlantis is shockingly blatant and comes over like a cocky web start-up. It is paying dividends: the site's owners claim to have processed half a million dollars in deals since March. There are allegations that it is a honeypot , drawing in ex-Silk Road vendors by charging lower fees, and offering proprietary encryption, rather than demanding that users learn PGP software ( Pretty Good Privacy ). This means the site's owners might be able to see where dealers on the site are sending drugs to, and identify customers, or listen in on email conversations and begin to expose dealers. Might the DEA have set up a bogus site to ensnare the unwary? While nothing any government does around privacy should surprise us nowadays, from indiscriminately recording our every thought and whim, to spying on the grieving parents of murdered children with the aim of smearing their characters, the emergence of Atlantis and sites like it into the mainstream does raise the interesting prospect of a new war on encryption. Encryption software, most commonly PGP, scrambles your mail, making it impossible for a third party who does not own two special "keys" to read your mail.  Now the Prism and Tempora cats are out of the bag, and it's dawned on almost everyone what fools they've been, I'd guess that governments will soon be very keen to control encryption and will use the drug problem as a straw man defence for their next wave of intrusion. Note to government, it didn't work last time . To quote John Callas, who helped invent PGP with Phil Zimmerman: "PGP is just math, and you can't ban math." In the UK, though, encryption can be a de facto crime under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa), the Labour-era assault on civil liberties. Refuse to hand over the private keys to your private files and you can and will be jailed. IT website The Register reported in 2009 that the first person jailed under part three of Ripa was "a schizophrenic science hobbyist with no criminal record". Found with a model rocket as he returned from Paris, he refused to give police the keys to his encrypted data: indeed, he refused to speak at all, and was jailed for 13 months. Six months into his sentence the man was sectioned under the Mental Health Act and does not know when he will be released. It's pretty easy to see what the initial official response to sites such as Atlantis will be. There'll be a concerted media campaign to scare people off. A few big busts of users, plus an attempted and likely very public assault on Bitcoin , the anonymous currency used to pay for the drugs. But Bitcoin is essentially unassailable, because the currency has no central bank, and is made and maintained by a network of users. There's now enough of it in circulation to become a closed and private economy. Bitcoin is divisible into eight decimal places – 0.00000001 BTC is the smallest amount that can be handled in a transaction – so there's plenty of spare capacity. Perhaps an attack on Tor might work? Tor is the anonymising software that enables these markets to be hosted and accessed secretly. To quote Andrew Lewman, the Tor project's spokesman:  "Our code is all open source, everything we do is open source, and is mirrored all over the world. So even if, for whatever reason, let's say the paedophile-terrorist-druglords and the four horsemen of the apocalypse take over Tor and that's the majority usage, then the current Tor network could shut down, and just like a phoenix it will get born again. Then maybe we'll have 10 or 1,200 Tor networks because everyone starts running their own." The only way to tackle online markets such as this is to make postal procedures hugely onerous. But that costs. The Royal Mail is about to be privatised and no one wants to invest. With 96% of itsstaff supporting a strike and opposing privatisation, it's hard to see workers agreeing to new requirements to scan every piece of post for drugs. In any case, queues in understaffed offices are so lengthy and the entire process of posting a letter so redolent of the frustrating world before the net there would be a customer revolt. And there's no way sniffer dogs can tackle the circa 70m pieces of just domestic post at the sorting offices each day. When I was researching my book on the internet drugs trade , the Royal Mail refused to answer even the simplest questions about steps taken to identify packages containing drugs. The reason for that, postmen have told me privately, is that there are none. There's a new Russian anonymous market, that has just come online too. There will be many more, since prohibition makes their operation profitable and their use logical. Free market economics, whose rules of supply and demand we so conspicuously ignore in this vast sector of the economy, make simple herbs and plant extracts or simply produced chemicals worth many millions of pounds per tonne. And so there will always be a market. That market has now been virtualised: Drugs 2.0 – click here to buy now. But while I smile in disbelief at the defiance and subversion of sites like Silk Road and Atlantis, I can't help thinking that this cavalier dismantling of the failed and discredited prohibition model, replacing it with another system d

Vice All News Time01 July 2013 20:05:44


The Breakdown | Lions supporters fear referee more than Australia in second Test | Paul Rees

28 June 2013 14:21:23 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

The Lions have been throwing compliments at Craig Joubert, with the scrum set to be the central feature of the match The Etihad Stadium in Melbourne has been called a few names since it opened in 2000, but not as many as Ireland supporters coined for the referee Paddy O'Brien during the World Cup group match against Australia 10 years ago. Ireland lost by one point – Brian O'Driscoll, who scored a try, and Paul O'Connell were in their team – and the result meant they finished second in their group, earning them a quarter-final against France rather than Scotland. Ireland looked to take on Australia up front but, as Argentina had found in the opening match of the tournament and England were to at the end, they struggled to make their superiority in the scrum count because referees had a high tolerance threshold when it came to collapses. There was a point in the Australia-Ireland match when O'Brien warned the home prop Bill Young that if he did not remain upright he would be sent to the sin-bin. The next scrum, five metres from the Wallabies' line, went down but there was no card. The scrum promises to be a central feature of the second Test at the ground with Craig Joubert refereeing. He is not Australia's favourite official after the way he controlled the 2011 World Cup semi-final against New Zealand , but in the first Test between the Wallabies and Wales in Brisbane last year he penalised Wales at scrums where they were going forward. Early engagements are his pet hate, as Scotland found against Wales in the Six Nations. The first few scrums will hold an indication about the way he will go: free-kicks to the Lions for Australia going early will settle the tourists, but if they go to the Wallabies, the Lions will have to rethink their strategy. Tit-for-tat decisions may be a disincentive to both front rows to try anything on, but as the modern scrum is all about the hit, the Lions will want to exploit attacking decisions. Their best scrum in Brisbane came after they had been awarded a free-kick because the Wallabies had engaged early. The Lions opted for another scrum and, knowing the Wallabies would be tentative, won the hit and surged forward. The Lions have spent the week throwing compliments at Joubert, something they did not do to Chris Pollock last week. The charm offensive on the South African started the day the squad was announced and may the day come soon when coaches do not have to lay garlands at the feet of officials before matches. Those who are involved on Saturday, players, coaches and those who have paid to watch, can only hope that the match is decided by the two teams, not the man with the whistle, but it will probably not pay to do any breath holding. There is a fear among the army of visiting supporters here that a level series going into the final game in Sydney would suit the hosts and their television partners, a cynicism based in part on what has happened here in the past. At least Joubert should be more even-handed in the tackle area than Pollock was, but a Test match should not come down to which laws, and indeed which sections of a particular law, a referee decides to act upon. They are pushed to the limits by players and coaches: as the prop Adam Jones said on Thursday, each regulation change brings a fresh opportunity to find a way of cheating. The refereeing might have been subjective last week, but the game reached a tense finale with the result in doubt until the final whistle. Both sides succeeded in cancelling out the other in key areas, the Lions did not get the go-forward from the lineout they had anticipated while the Wallabies struggled to get the ball wide, and opportunities tended to come from mistakes. The tension will be even higher on Saturday. The Australia coach, Robbie Deans, will have warned his players, not they would have needed telling, about the folly of kicking the ball to George North unless he is going to catch it and be tackled at the same time, while the Lions will have fretted about the space they allowed Will Genia around the fringes. The Lions got their back row wrong in Brisbane with Tom Croft not winning the expected lineout ball at the back. Genia had room to dance while his opposite number, Mike Phillips, was invited into holes and then flattened by Ben Mowen. The Lions tried to run slow ball from nine, but Jonathan Sexton will be the conduit in Melbourne, not that the Lions will be taking liberties in their own half on their own ball. They will look to play in the Australia half, or at least in range of the boot of Leigh Halfpenny. Ten years ago, it was Jonny Wilkinson who Australians feared; now it is an equally softly-spoken, driven individual who prefers to be judged by deeds than words. Halfpenny has nerves of steel but he gets jittery in the limelight. He is entering the final year of his contract with Cardiff Blues and there are certain to be clubs in France calculating how much it would cost to gain his signature: Wilkinson's Toulon will be looking for a new goal-kicker next year. Australia would have won last week had Halfpenny been wearing green and gold, and handsomely so. Their designated goal-kicker, Christian Leali'ifano, would probably have made a better fist of it in his dazed condition than James O'Connor and Kurtley Beale, the two hungry backs who caused an unnecessary distraction for the Wallabies this week when they were snapped in a fast-food joint just before 4am . Beale will offer Australia thrust at full-back, but O'Connor will need to respond to Genia more quickly than he did last week. The Wallabies have enough playmakers behind, but pivotal for them will be the advantage they take of the absence of Alex Corbisiero and Paul O'Connell. The Lions head coach, Warren Gatland, has taken a risk in doing without a specialist second row on his bench, but he gained little momentum from his replacements last week and Australia, surprisingly, finished the game the strongest. Gatland will need to keep Adam Jones on for longer than in Brisbane. The second Test is all about control. If there is a danger that Australia, needing to win, start on the front foot, the tone will be set by how Joubert manages the scrums and that, given what has happened here this century, is vexing the away support who fear the referee more than the Wallabies. IRB SHOULD REVIEW APPEAL PROCESS The decision of the International Rugby Board to review the decision of a judicial officer not to punish Australia's captain, James Horwill , for a piece of footwork that left the Lions lock Alun Wyn Jones needing stitches in his head last week is in one sense welcome, but in another it is dangerous. Horwill's defence that contact with Jones was inadvertent did not appear to stand up to scrutiny after repeated viewing of the one camera angle that has been shown here this week. But the four-hour hearing in which he was cleared showed eight other camera angles. The decision to clear him was not reached in an instant but was based on the evidence presented, although the injury suffer

Vice All News Time28 June 2013 14:21:23


The Fiver | The power of good grooming and positive presentation

05 June 2013 17:26:20 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Click here to have the Fiver sent to your inbox every weekday at 5pm, or if your usual copy has stopped arriving SUITS YOU, SIR Roberto Martínez is considered an audacious manager so will not balk at the challenge that the Fiver hereby throws down to him: ditch the sharp suits, slick patter and permanent availability to the media – instead, cultivate a straggly beard and earthy hum while wearing denim tracksuits and a scowl. If the Spaniard remains one of the most respected gaffers in the game while following that Gok Wan guide, then the Fiver will truly accept that he deserves the acclaim and his lofty reputation is not just an example of the power of good grooming and positive presentation. As things stand, the Fiver just can't decide if Martinez is a prize pupil or smooth prefect. On one hand, the Fiver admires the fact that Martínez guided Wigan to FA Cup victory over Manchester City, especially as he did so while refusing to take the easy cop-out of resting players for league games. On the other, we know that trophies aren't everything, as David Moyes might say, and we can't help but notice that Wigan were barely out of the bottom three during Martínez's four-year tenure and, of course, they have just been relegated. We know he has nice principles, we're just not fully convinced he knows how to apply them. There's something about the 19,765 defensive blunders that Wigan made during his reign that doesn't feel right. So it seems slightly odd that Martinez has today been confirmed as the new manager of Everton, a year after he allegedly turned down a similar offer from Liverpool in order to stay at Wigan "and take the club to the next level", by which he presumably didn't mean the Championship. "Everton Football Club is today delighted to confirm the appointment of Roberto Martínez as its next manager," read a statement from the club in case the Fiver's word alone wouldn't do. "The 39-year-old Spaniard joins from Wigan Athletic and has signed a four-year contract at Goodison Park," added the statement, just in case anyone thought they had been referring to the 87-year-old Chinese Roberto Martínez, about whom we also have our doubts. QUOTE OF THE DAY "He's making some big mistakes. He has got a lot to learn" – Titus Bramble dishes out a sermon to Sunderland boss Paolo Di Canio. Just let that one percolate for a minute. FIVER LETTERS "For a long time I thought I was Utah's sole Fiver reader until yesterday when I saw this . Is this a second, and clearly more dedicated reader, or the Fiver's long-lost cousin from the Beehive State, Multiple Wife, Caffeine-Free, 0% Alcohol, Vote Mitt Fiver?" – Killian Barrins. "Re: Tom Hillyard writing about Graham Arnold (yesterday's Fiver letters). I am not disagreeing with how grim things must be at Sheffield United but to cast aspersions on the mighty Central Coast Mariners cuts to my core. On the smallest budget of any club in the A-League the Mariners stormed home to be crowned champions playing some very attractive football. I suspect Mr Hillyard might follow those upmarket big spenders known as Sydney FC. Jealously me thinks" – Tony Thompson. " This is how grim things currently are at Sheffield United" – Chris Draper. "In light of the final line of yesterday's Fiver, should Scotland U-21 manager Billy Stark perhaps be advised to avoid Fiver Towers for the foreseeable future? Might Exeter City full-back Steve Tully be advised to stay away too? Winter is coming" – Neil Turner. • Send your letters to the.boss@guardian.co.uk . Also, if you've nothing better to do you can also tweet the Fiver . Today's winner of our prizeless letter o' the day prize is: Killian Barrins. JOIN GUARDIAN SOULMATES We keep trying to point out the utter futility of advertising an online dating service "for interesting people" in the Fiver to the naive folk who run Guardian Soulmates, but they still aren't having any of it. So here you go – sign up here to view profiles of the kind of erudite, sociable and friendly romantics who would never dream of going out with you. BITS AND BOBS Expect needless circulation of that photo now that Millwall have been given permission to speak with St Johnstone boss Steve Lomas over their managerial vacancy. "As with our previous two managers, we will not stand in the way of Steve," declared ambitious Saints chairman Steve Brown. Know-it-all José Mourinho has accused Cristiano Ronaldo of being … a bit of a know-it-all. "I had only one problem with him, very simple, very basic … because maybe he thinks he knows everything and the coach cannot help him to develop," said a pot about a kettle . Sunderland team-mates Phil Bardsley and Stéphane Sessègnon have returned from holiday to find their homes burgled . Northumbria police don't believe the crimes are connected. And Robert Lewandowski hopes his move from Borussia Dortmund is sorted out swiftly. Him and the Fiver both. "I assume that all will now be cleared up and I can join the club of my wish this summer," he cheered. RECOMMENDED VIEWING Greek children, a headfirst free-kick and the unluckiest miss ever: it's the amazing world of football season review: part two . STILL WANT MORE? Marina Hyde explains why José Mourinho's return to England is more booty call than love affair . With Michael Ballack's testimonial on the horizon, was he an arrogant player that was quite good or was he just really, really, really, really good? Marcus Christenson investigates . Keegan appointing Lawro as coach? David Pleat as Marbella's 'football adviser?' Why creating a job out of nothing isn't always the best idea . It's Gallery time, with Louise Taylor giving her rundown of the eight brightest young scamps in the European Under-21 Championships . Gregg Bakowski has defaced some of football's most

Vice All News Time05 June 2013 17:26:20


The Fiver | The power of good grooming and positive presentation

05 June 2013 17:26:19 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

Click here to have the Fiver sent to your inbox every weekday at 5pm, or if your usual copy has stopped arriving SUITS YOU, SIR Roberto Martínez is considered an audacious manager so will not balk at the challenge that the Fiver hereby throws down to him: ditch the sharp suits, slick patter and permanent availability to the media – instead, cultivate a straggly beard and earthy hum while wearing denim tracksuits and a scowl. If the Spaniard remains one of the most respected gaffers in the game while following that Gok Wan guide, then the Fiver will truly accept that he deserves the acclaim and his lofty reputation is not just an example of the power of good grooming and positive presentation. As things stand, the Fiver just can't decide if Martinez is a prize pupil or smooth prefect. On one hand, the Fiver admires the fact that Martínez guided Wigan to FA Cup victory over Manchester City, especially as he did so while refusing to take the easy cop-out of resting players for league games. On the other, we know that trophies aren't everything, as David Moyes might say, and we can't help but notice that Wigan were barely out of the bottom three during Martínez's four-year tenure and, of course, they have just been relegated. We know he has nice principles, we're just not fully convinced he knows how to apply them. There's something about the 19,765 defensive blunders that Wigan made during his reign that doesn't feel right. So it seems slightly odd that Martinez has today been confirmed as the new manager of Everton, a year after he allegedly turned down a similar offer from Liverpool in order to stay at Wigan "and take the club to the next level", by which he presumably didn't mean the Championship. "Everton Football Club is today delighted to confirm the appointment of Roberto Martínez as its next manager," read a statement from the club in case the Fiver's word alone wouldn't do. "The 39-year-old Spaniard joins from Wigan Athletic and has signed a four-year contract at Goodison Park," added the statement, just in case anyone thought they had been referring to the 87-year-old Chinese Roberto Martínez, about whom we also have our doubts. QUOTE OF THE DAY "He's making some big mistakes. He has got a lot to learn" – Titus Bramble dishes out a sermon to Sunderland boss Paolo Di Canio. Just let that one percolate for a minute. FIVER LETTERS "For a long time I thought I was Utah's sole Fiver reader until yesterday when I saw this . Is this a second, and clearly more dedicated reader, or the Fiver's long-lost cousin from the Beehive State, Multiple Wife, Caffeine-Free, 0% Alcohol, Vote Mitt Fiver?" – Killian Barrins. "Re: Tom Hillyard writing about Graham Arnold (yesterday's Fiver letters). I am not disagreeing with how grim things must be at Sheffield United but to cast aspersions on the mighty Central Coast Mariners cuts to my core. On the smallest budget of any club in the A-League the Mariners stormed home to be crowned champions playing some very attractive football. I suspect Mr Hillyard might follow those upmarket big spenders known as Sydney FC. Jealously me thinks" – Tony Thompson. " This is how grim things currently are at Sheffield United" – Chris Draper. "In light of the final line of yesterday's Fiver, should Scotland U-21 manager Billy Stark perhaps be advised to avoid Fiver Towers for the foreseeable future? Might Exeter City full-back Steve Tully be advised to stay away too? Winter is coming" – Neil Turner. • Send your letters to the.boss@guardian.co.uk . Also, if you've nothing better to do you can also tweet the Fiver . Today's winner of our prizeless letter o' the day prize is: Killian Barrins. JOIN GUARDIAN SOULMATES We keep trying to point out the utter futility of advertising an online dating service "for interesting people" in the Fiver to the naive folk who run Guardian Soulmates, but they still aren't having any of it. So here you go – sign up here to view profiles of the kind of erudite, sociable and friendly romantics who would never dream of going out with you. BITS AND BOBS Expect needless circulation of that photo now that Millwall have been given permission to speak with St Johnstone boss Steve Lomas over their managerial vacancy. "As with our previous two managers, we will not stand in the way of Steve," declared ambitious Saints chairman Steve Brown. Know-it-all José Mourinho has accused Cristiano Ronaldo of being … a bit of a know-it-all. "I had only one problem with him, very simple, very basic … because maybe he thinks he knows everything and the coach cannot help him to develop," said a pot about a kettle . Sunderland team-mates Phil Bardsley and Stéphane Sessègnon have returned from holiday to find their homes burgled . Northumbria police don't believe the crimes are connected. And Robert Lewandowski hopes his move from Borussia Dortmund is sorted out swiftly. Him and the Fiver both. "I assume that all will now be cleared up and I can join the club of my wish this summer," he cheered. RECOMMENDED VIEWING Greek children, a headfirst free-kick and the unluckiest miss ever: it's the amazing world of football season review: part two . STILL WANT MORE? Marina Hyde explains why José Mourinho's return to England is more booty call than love affair . With Michael Ballack's testimonial on the horizon, was he an arrogant player that was quite good or was he just really, really, really, really good? Marcus Christenson investigates . Keegan appointing Lawro as coach? David Pleat as Marbella's 'football adviser?' Why creating a job out of nothing isn't always the best idea . It's Gallery time, with Louise Taylor giving her rundown of the eight brightest young scamps in the European Under-21 Championships . Gregg Bakowski has defaced some of football's most

Vice All News Time05 June 2013 17:26:19


The Breakdown | Lions advised to strike early to capitalise on Australia rustiness | Paul Rees

23 May 2013 12:07:17 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Matt Dawson believes the Wallabies' lack of a warm-up match before the first Test could be a key factor of the tour One of the appeals of a Lions tour is that not even those in charge can see the bends that lie ahead. A sub-plot in the 1997 tour to South Africa was the confrontation at scrum-half between Robert Howley and Joost van der Westhuizen. Sunday newspapers which had made it the focus of their first Test previews had just hours to rewrite a few thousand words when Howley suffered an injury on the Saturday against Natal that forced him to pull out of the tour. The Welshman's misfortune gave an opportunity to Matt Dawson, and he played a key role in the first Test victory in Cape Town, scoring the winning try 10 minutes from time when the Springboks had been leading 16-15. He picked up from a scrum around 20 metres out from the South Africa line and scurried away. As the South Africa No8 Gary Teichmann was about to pounce, Dawson dummied an overhead pass, checking the defenders and giving him a clear run to the line. When asked afterwards whether he would have bought the dummy off Howley, Teichmann paused, smiled and said probably not. Dawson had provided a touch of the unexpected and the Lions were on their way to a series win – their last – which was clinched the following week with a Jeremy Guscott drop goal from the scrum-half's pass. Dawson was to go on two more Lions tours, which provided far different experiences. "I am bullish about the Lions' prospects in Australia," said Dawson, who has been taking part this month in the Shell FuelSave Driving Challenge, which culminated in the Shell Eco-marathon in Rotterdam. "They have an exciting set of players and while they have limited preparation time, I have never totally believed in having to spend lots of time on the training field; and it has been a long season." There was a considerable amount of time on the training field in Australia in 2001 under a New Zealander who was then coaching Wales, Graham Henry, someone Dawson did not have a close relationship with. Another Kiwi who is employed by the Welsh Rugby Union, Warren Gatland, is in charge this year and a feature of his time with Wasps, which coincided with the start of the Premiership play-offs, was how he managed his players towards the end of a season when bodies, and minds, became tired. Dawson was one of them. "There is a perception in Australia that the Lions will be one-dimensional, but knowing Gats as a coach, he will not be planning to play it one way," said Dawson. "The Lions will be powerful up front and they will take the Wallabies on there, but to win the series, they will have to be creative and score tries. That will mean making the correct decisions under pressure. "It will be interesting to see who they pick at inside centre. It may be Manu Tuilagi, a player who can cause mayhem but who has to be in the mood, but I would look at Brian O'Driscoll: he would provide that extra bit of variation and his distribution skills are what will be needed to bring a dangerous back three into play and take the Lions into the outside channels. "Tuilagi could run lines off O'Driscoll and that partnership is one of the features I am looking forward to. That is not to forget Jamie Roberts, who did well in South Africa four years ago, but 1997 showed that a tour does not always evolve in the way that is expected at the start. "In 2001, we started well, winning the first Test and getting well on top in the first-half of the second, but by the final, deciding match injuries meant that everyone had to dig in. There was a momentum shift at the end of the opening period in the second Test: Richard Hill was injured after being tackled by Nathan Grey and just after the restart, a long Jonny Wilkinson pass was intercepted and Australia were away." It will be the Lions third full tour of Australia (1904 is regarded as unofficial), a series that defies convention because in 1989 and 2001, the team that won the first Test lost the series. The only other tour where that happened was in 1930 in New Zealand when the Lions started off with a victory but lost the next three internationals. In South Africa in 1955, they tied the series after opening with a win. It is the fifth tour in the professional era and only the second time that the opponents are not the World Cup holders: 2005 was the other occasion – two years after England, and Dawson, had claimed the trophy in Australia. The Wallabies finished third in 2011, but they are being seen as vulnerable, with the head coach Robbie Deans heading towards the end of his contract with a consequent jockeying for his position and a squad that lacks the depth of the Lions' in certain positions. "To me, a bigger factor than the preparation time the Lions have is Australia's lack of a warm-up match," said Dawson. "By the time of the first Test, it will be their first international for more than six months and some of their players will have gone three or four weeks without a game. That will be the time for the Lions to strike. "Never mind what happened in 1989 and 2001, winning the first Test gives you an advantage. The Lions will not face the strongest opposition in the build-up because the Wallabies will be in camp, but [that] was the case on the last few tours and I do not expect it to be a factor. Four years ago, the players gelled very quickly and that series could have gone either way. "It is a long time since the Lions won a series, and being part of a winning team in 1997 was one of the highlights of my career, but what is important is that they live on. When the game turned professional, everyone seemed to be predicting the end of the Lions and the Barbarians, but there they are meeting in Hong Kong next week. "The Lions are one of the biggest brands in the game, a great commercial animal that provides a bridge between the professional present and the amateur past and gives them a unique ethos. We are in for some special moments in the next few weeks: I was tilting towards a 3-0 Lions win, but Australia do have Will Genia. A lot of pressure will be on one man so I will go for 2-1." Derby days in the play-offs Leicester making the play-off final is nothing new, but Saturday will be the first time the showpiece has also been a derby with East Midlands rivals Northampton providing the opposition. It is Leicester's ninth consecutive final and Northampton will be the seventh club they have faced after Wasps, Sale, Gloucester, London Irish, Saracens and Harlequins. In the first two finals, Wasps overcame Gloucester and Bath. Leicester generally start as favourites, at least since Wasps stopped being contenders, and they have doubled Northampton this season, but then so had Saracens, Saints' victims in the semi-final at Allianz Park. Northampton played the role of underdogs effectively that day, starting with a ferocity that put them 17 points ahead in the opening half. They had prepared diligently, never allowing Sarries to settle and exploiting the absence of Brad Barritt in the home midfield. Saracens only lost one Premiership match this season when Barritt was playing, against Exeter back in September. In the 10 Premiership matches he played in, Sarries conceded six tries; in the 13 he missed, they shipped 22. The figures are distorted by the absence of other international players for many of the matches Barritt missed, but in the five Premiership games outside the Test windows that he wa

Vice All News Time23 May 2013 12:07:17


Giants present Cabrera with World Series ring before loss to Blue Jays

15 May 2013 16:14:44 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Outfielder tested positive for testosterone last year • Manager Bochy presents ring in private ceremony The Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Melky Cabrera was presented with his 2012 World Series ring on Tuesday night, nine months after he was suspended for 50 games for a positive testosterone test . Bruce Bochy, the manager of the San Francisco Giants , made the presentation before Toronto's 10-6 victory, in which Cabrera had four hits, including an RBI single in a six-run first inning. After his positive test, Cabrera was left off San Francisco's postseason roster. RA Dickey, a Cy Young Award winner in 2012, when he was with the New York Mets , snapped a four-start winless streak by pitching the big-spending Blue Jays to victory. Dickey (3-5) struck out a season-high 10 in six innings, allowing two runs. The Blue Jays had a season-high 18 hits as the..y won a third straight game for only the second time this season. Adrian Beltre hit a tiebreaking home run in the 10th inning and Mitch Moreland followed with his second of the game to give the Texas Rangers a 6-5 win over the Oakland Athletics and with it a six-game lead over the A's atop the American League West division. Among other games, Arizona downed Atlanta thanks to an infield double, the New York Yankees edged Seattle and Tampa Bay won its sixth straight by defeating Boston. Interleague games saw Philadelphia down Cleveland and San Diego edge Baltimore on its final out. Beltre sent a 3-0 pitch from Chris Resop (1-1) past center field with one out in the 10th for his ninth homer of the year. Moreland connected two batters later. He also hit a two-run shot in the fourth. In the bottom of the tenth, Rangers closer Joe Nathan went through 31 pitches, giving up a run and then loading the bases before getting the final out for his 12th save of the season. The A's manager, Bob Melvin, was ejected for the third time this season. Patrick Corbin pitched seven scoreless innings to lead the Arizona Diamondbacks to a 2-0 win over the Atlanta Braves . Corbin (6-0) induced three double plays and struck out five to win his career-high sixth straight game. He is the first Diamondbacks pitcher to start 6-0 since Brandon Webb won nine straight in 2008. Atlanta's Julio Teheran (2-1) matched Corbin most of the way, but a mix-up with first baseman Freddie Freeman gifted Gerardo Parra an infield double in the third inning, and Didi Gregorius followed with a two-run single. Robinson Cano hit a two-run double and Lyle Overbay delivered a tiebreaking sacrifice fly as the New York Yankees beat the Seattle Mariners 4-3. Seattle ace Felix Hernandez injured his back when fielding a ground ball in the sixth and exited with a 3-1 lead. Hernandez allowed one earned run in another strong outing at Yankee Stadium, and leads the AL with a 1.53 ERA. The Yankees capitalized on the injury by scoring three runs in the seventh to win for the seventh time in eight games. Matt Moore pitched six solid innings to remain unbeaten and tie for the major league lead in wins, sending the surging Tampa Bay Rays to a 5-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox . Moore (7-0) yielded a three-run homer to David Ortiz in the first, then limited the struggling Red Sox to one hit over the next five innings. The Rays overcame the early deficit with a five-run fifth, and that completed the scoring, condemning the Red Sox to their sixth loss in seven games. Moore matched Washington's Jordan Zimmerman for the MLB lead in victories, became the first Tampa Bay starter to begin a season 7-0 and tied a club record by winning his eighth straight decision dating to September. Jonathan Pettibone pitched neatly into the seventh, guiding the Philadelphia Phillies to a 6-2 win over the Cleveland Indians . Pettibone (3-0) allowed four hits in six 2-3 innings, the longest of his five career starts. The Phillies improved to 12-4 when Pettibone, Kyle Kendrick or John Lannan start. They're 7-16 in games started by the vaunted trio of Cole Hamels, Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee. Kevin Frandsen and Domonic Brown hit solo homers for the Phillies, who won their third straight game to get within two wins of .500. Chris Denorfia and Everth Cabrera hit two-out RBI singles off Jim Johnson in the ninth inning, lifting the San Diego Padres to a 3-2 win at the Baltimore Orioles . After the Orioles took a 2-1 lead in the eighth, Johnson (1-3) entered with a franchise-record streak of 35 straight converted saves. He immediately gave up two consecutive singles before inducing a double play. But Denorfia followed with a single up the middle and, after a hit batter, Cabrera singled to center for a 3-2 lead. Carlos Quentin earlier hit a homer for the Padres, who had entered the game with a 0-18 record when trailing after eight innings. Carlos Beltran drove in four runs against his old side as the St Louis Cardinals cruised past the New York Mets 10-4. Beltran slammed a three-run homer in the fifth inning, his team-high 10th, to give St Louis a 9-0 lead. He also added a run-scoring hit in the third to help the Cardinals to their fifth win in six games. St Louis rookie pitcher John Gast picked up a win in his major league debut, throwing five shutout innings before giving up four runs in the sixth. Andrew McCutchen homered leading off the bottom of the 12th inning to lift the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 4-3 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers . Carlos Gonzalez homered twice and finished with a career-high five hits to lead the struggling Colorado Rockies to a 9-4 victory over the Chicago Cubs . Clayton Kershaw scattered struck out 11 in 8 2-3 scoreless innings, steering the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 2-0 win over the Washington Nationals . Albert Pujols, Howie Kendrick, Josh Hamilton and Mike Trout all homered off Jeremy Guthrie, giving the Los Angeles Angels a 6-2 win over the Kansas City Royals , and the Royals pitcher his first loss in 19 starts. Adam Dunn and Dayan Viciedo hit consecutive homers to power the Chicago White Sox to a 4-2 win over the Minnesota Twins . Homer Bailey pitched a complete game, with 10 strikeouts and no walks, to guide the Cincinnati Reds to a 6-2 win over the Miami Marlins . Miguel Cabrera homered to help the Detroit Tigers beat the Houston Astros 6-2. MLB San Francisco Giants Toronto Blue Jays

Vice All News Time15 May 2013 16:14:44


The real Harry Redknapp

30 April 2013 17:09:29 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

A year ago, he was tipped to be the next England manager and his Tottenham team were riding high. Today the England job is a distant memory and his new team QPR have been relegated. How disappointed must Redknapp be? Not as much as people might think, writes John Crace On the morning of 8 February last year Harry Redknapp was cleared of tax evasion; that evening Fabio Capello announced his immediate resignation as England football manager . The timing was hardly a coincidence. Capello had never been a popular manager – particularly with football reporters – and after he had made clear the previous year that he was planning to give up the job after Euro 2012, Redknapp had been almost universally anointed manager-elect. With his acquittal, the only obstacle to the succession had been removed. The Harry love-in continued for a couple of months, with nearly every current England player and football pundit weighing in to back Redknapp as the ideal man for the job. Even the Football Association appeared to be endorsing him, with board member Phil Gartside telling the BBC that Redknapp would be "an outstanding England manager". And then, seemingly out of the blue, Roy Hodgson was given the job. If there had been a shortlist, Redknapp hadn't even been on it, as he wasn't invited for a job interview. Redknapp was gracious about missing out, but it was a public humiliation. Worse was to come. Before the trial, Redknapp's Tottenham Hotspur team had been playing some of the best football in the Premiership. Afterwards, their form fell away and when Chelsea won the European Champions League , Spurs were squeezed out of the top level of European competition for the following season. It didn't seem quite the time for Redknapp to engage in brinkmanship with Spurs chairman Daniel Levy over the renewal of his contract. And so it proved; rather than negotiate, Levy sacked him in June . By November 2012, Redknapp was back in business at another Premiership side, Queens Park Rangers , but his magic touch again went awol. At the weekend they were relegated. Things haven't exactly been rosy in the England camp, either. Hodgson's tenure has proved much as expected: methodical, hard-working, but inspiration- and charisma-free. England predictably made hard work of Euro 2012, losing to Italy on penalties in the quarter final, and are no certainty to qualify for the World Cup in Brazil next year. Many England supporters who have been observing Redknapp's apparent fall from grace at QPR couldn't help but wonder if Harry wasn't the second-best manager that England never had (the accolade for best still goes to Brian Clough). What almost no one was thinking was whether it was just possible Redknapp had dodged a bullet. There was a gag going round the terraces of White Hart Lane last season when it seemed inevitable Redknapp would become England manager. "What's the first thing Harry will do when he takes over England? Buy a couple of Croatians." The joke was double-edged, recognising both that the England team looked old and short of quality and that Redknapp's preferred solution at all the clubs he had previously managed was to buy his way out of trouble. With this being a non-starter for an England manager, the implication was that Redknapp would struggle at international level. And yet it was equally possible that his weaknesses at club level could have proved an asset for England. "The England manager has to play the cards he is dealt," says TalkSport presenter Sam Delaney. "While Harry was very good at wheeler-dealering, it could be very distracting. As England manager, his focus would have been maintained on his existing squad. In the same way, an international manager doesn't have to worry too much about building a squad and developing talent – neither of which are Harry's strongest points; his job is merely to pick the best players who are available to him. Nor does the team ever play so frequently that the squad needs to be rotated – another often-cited Redknapp weakness." It has also often been argued that Redknapp isn't the greatest tactician – the former Spurs player Rafa van der Vaart once remarked that the tactics chalkboard in the dressing-room was usually kept blank – but he is more than good enough. And his motivational skills would have more than compensated, because at international level a manager is trying to achieve a short-term lift. For a single game or a four-week tournament, Redknapp's basic enthusiasm and common sense are precisely what is needed. Over the course of a full Premier League season, telling a striker – as Redknapp once did to Roman Pavlyuchenko – "to fucking run around a bit" might end up doing more harm than good, but to get a result over 90 minutes it can be effective street football. Regardless of the qualities Redknapp may have brought to the job, his time as England manager would, almost certainly, have ended in tears. Because every England manager's does. The national side isn't as good as it thinks it is – or, come the major tournaments, as the media hypes it to be – and the inevitable early exit from the Euros and the World Cup is almost invariably followed by recriminations and a sacking. Not that it would have stopped him from accepting the England job had he been asked. Redknapp was 65 at the time and what better way to end your career than taking over the national side? A more interesting question, though, is just how much Redknapp really wanted the England job. The answer is not what you might expect. Redknapp has been misread by fans, footballers and reporters for years. Despite appearances to the contrary, Redknapp has never been football's ordinary man; he has always been everyone's exception. Other British football managers may have had more success, but few have been more universally loved. He is a man with the gift of making you feel as if you know him when you don't: a national treasure whose weaknesses only add to his charm. For some, he is the what-you-see-is-what-you-get, always-ready-to-have-a-laugh character out of an Ealing comedy: for others, including the police on occasion, he is the East End working-class wide boy. The archetypal dodgy geezer. Both versions of Redknapp are hopelessly simplistic. You don't get to manage a Premiership club just by cracking jokes and being charming. A manager who was a soft touch wouldn't last a month. Neither does the dodgy geezer caricature stack up. There have been rumours about Redknapp's financial dealings for more than a decade, but he was cleared of taking bungs by the Stevens inquiry into corruption in football in 2

Vice All News Time30 April 2013 17:09:29


Curious Incident counts out seven Olivier awards

28 April 2013 22:38:51 Film | theguardian.com

Play about maths genius equals Matilda's record, as Helen Mirren has first win and Top Hat is named best musical The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time dominated the UK's most prestigious theatre awards on Sunday night, equalling the record by picking up seven Oliviers, including best actor for its young star, Luke Treadaway. The 28-year-old, who gives an astonishing performance as 15-year-old maths genius Christopher Boone, beat heavyweight competition in the shape of Rupert Everett, James McAvoy, Mark Rylance and Rafe Spall to pick up the prize at the Royal Opera House ceremony. The awards, now in their 37th year, also saw Helen Mirren win her first Olivier, for her performance as the Queen in The Audience. The musical honours were shared by Top Hat and Sweeney Todd which won three apiece. Accepting her award Mirren said she thought the Queen would be thrilled and deserved an award herself for "the most consistent and committed performance of the 20th century and probably the 21st too." But it was Curious Incident that dominated the awards. It was nominated in eight categories and won in seven, equalling the record set by the Royal Shakespeare Company's Matilda the Musical last year. The play, an adaptation of Mark Haddon's bestselling novel from 2003, began life on the National Theatre's smallest stage, the Cottesloe, and continues the theatre's impressive run in successfully transferring shows such as War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors to the West End. As well as the award for Treadaway, the show was named best new play while Marianne Elliott won best director and Spooks actor Nicola Walker, who played the teenager's mother in the original production, won best supporting actress. Elliott said: "We took risks and we thought we would fail and it is a testament to subsidised theatre that we were allowed to think we might fail." Treadaway said his immediate plan was to get "incredibly drunk". Before that though he stressed the importance of public subsidy in getting the play started. "It is a story about a child with a lot of differences who sees the world in a different way and people could connect to him, they could see themselves in him at times. Walker, who said the last prize she won was a swimming badge at school, admitted that the early workshopping of the play had been "absolutely terrifying." She added: "We all felt that we were doing something really important which sounds like a cliche but is true. It was something we really, really cared about, we were part of a proper company in the old-fashioned sense." The show's inventive set, with a graph-paper stage and props appearing from trapdoors, won the best design award for Bunny Christie and Finn Ross, and there were wins too for Ian Dickinson and Adrian Sutton for sound and Paule Constable for light design. The play tells the story of 15-year-old Christopher – who has an autistic spectrum condition, or behavioural problems, as he puts it – as he sets out to investigate who killed his neighbour's dog, opening in the process all sorts of cans of worms. The book, adapted for the stage by Simon Stephens, was a huge success with both young and adult readers and that is reflected in the West End audiences, where elderly couples and groups of teenagers are equally likely to join the standing ovation it regularly receives. In her fourth Olivier nomination and her first win, Mirren picked up the prize for her performance as the Queen at various ages in her regular meetings – "audiences" – with prime ministers from Winston Churchill to David Cameron, as imagined by writer Peter Morgan. Richard McCabe, who plays Harold Wilson, was named best supporting actor. McCabe later revealed that lots of the Royal household were sneaking in to the play incognito – "they must be reporting back!" He added: "It is a very sympathetic portrayal and there is something rather celebratory about it. That's what I like about the play, at the end of it you do sort of think 'well us Brits are not bad, actually'." By common consent the musical categories this year were not the strongest, with many producers delaying shows because of the Olympics, and heavyweights such as The Book of Mormon and Once arriving after the deadline. Michael Ball and Imelda Staunton, presenters of the awards in 2011 and 2012, were named best actor and actress in a musical for Sweeney Todd, which ran at the Adelphi from March to September last year, and Leigh Zimmerman won best supporting musical performance for her role in A Chorus Line. Top Hat, based on the 1935 Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie, won best new musical as well as awards for its choreography and costume design. Robert Wilson and Philip Glass's epic Einstein on the Beach, staged at the Barbican as part of the London 2012 Festival, was named best new opera production, while American tenor Bryan Hymel won an outstanding achievement award for performances at the Royal Opera House in Les Troyens, Robert Le Diable and Rusalka. The ROH's success continued in the dance categories with the Royal Ballet's Argentinian principal dancer, Marianela Núñez, winning an outstanding achievement award and Christopher Wheeldon's Aeternum winning best new dance production. The only prize chosen by public vote, the Radio 2 audience award, which rewards long-running musicals, went to Billy Elliot, which has been in the West End since 2005. Other drama wins were Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night, which won best revival; Goodnight Mister Tom, which won best entertainment and family show; and the Royal Court theatre, which won outstanding achievement in an affiliate theatre for its season of new writing in the Jerwood Theatre Upstairs. Special awards were given to choreographer and director Gillian Lynne and playwright Michael Frayn. The awards were hosted by Hugh Bonneville and Sheridan Smith, who opened the show singing Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend. The Oliviers have become notably starrier and more razzle-dazzle in recent years – an attempt to emulate Broadway's Tony awards – and this year also brought changes in the judging, with West End producers and theatre operators voting alongside dedicated panels. Olivier awards Theatre Awards and prizes Helen Mirren Musicals Mark Brown guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Vice All News Time28 April 2013 22:38:51


Rafael Nadal the ever present danger as Andy Murray marches on

17 April 2013 23:48:40 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

• Andy Murray beats Edouard Roger-Vasselin 6-1, 6-4 • Nadal happy his knees are holding up in Monte Carlo Andy Murray has to beat Stanislas Wawrinka here on Thursday to remain at No2 in the world and, given the help that would deliver in clearing a path into the late stages of the upcoming slams, starting in Paris towards the end of May, he will not lack for motivation. On the evidence of his first clay-court match of the season, an efficient rather than blistering win over the Frenchman Edouard Roger-Vasselin in 72 minutes in the second round of the Monte Carlo Masters on Wednesday, Murray is in good shape to prevail over the Swiss, who has won both their matches on clay. Even if he does win, Murray will remain wary of the one player he and everyone else fear most on this surface and in this event: Rafael Nadal. The Spaniard's 43rd consecutive win on this court also came in straight sets, 10 minutes quicker than Murray, although he was broken at the start of the second before crushing the challenge of Marinko Matosevic, for the cost of just three games. The world No4 was mildly amused by the cheek of the precocious young Australian, who tipped over one of his meticulously lined-up water bottles with his racket in the final changeover of the match, the tennis equivalent of stealing gold from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. "Was not a pressure moment," Nadal said, "but a funny one." Indeed. Just as well Matosevic left it until it didn't matter. "I played well at the beginning with the right intensity, no mistakes," Nadal said, "trying to find a good feeling on the ball, to find the right rhythm." The prospect of reaching for his ninth trophy on the spin in Monte Carlo does not bother him, either, especially after spending seven months out last year repairing his knees. "Every day is a present for me," he said. The next opponent who might like to try his luck in winding up Nadal, meanwhile, is Philipp Kohlschreiber, who embarrassed Murray here two years ago. However, if Nadal is to be denied at the tournament he owns, Murray will most likely be the player to stop him, in the semi-finals on Saturday, because Novak Djokovic, on the other side of the draw, admitted he was some way short of his best in recovering from 1-5 down in the first set to beat Mikhail Youzhny 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. His bruised ankle held up, but his confidence ebbed, and he was not pleased to be penalised for time-wasting. Murray is refreshed and injury-free after his exertions in his sweat-box tournament win over David Ferrer in Miami, and hit the ball pleasingly from all parts, served well and was only occasionally inconvenienced in beating Roger-Vasselin 6-1, 6-4. He seems more relaxed than at the start of his past two clay adventures, when he had to cope with an elbow injury in 2011 and a muscle-freezing back complaint last year. This time, he says, all the parts are clicking and he was relaxed enough later to joke about the prospect of playing his coach, Ivan Lendl, in a charity doubles match at Queen's in the summer. "It's for charity," he said, "so I would hope we have fun. I hope it's not too competitive." But would Lendl, famously aggressive as a player, try to nail him if he had the chance? "I'm sure there'll be some of that going on," he said of Old Stoneface, who remained inscrutable as ever throughout Wednesday's second-round match. He would have been satisfied, rather than ecstatic. Roger-Vasselin said of Murray's clay prospects: "I believe he's not bad on this surface, even if it's not his favourite. He moves very well on clay. I asked several players for advice, and not a single one was able to help me. They all said: 'Don't make mistakes and play well' – as if I didn't know that. It's difficult to find a solution to his game. I couldn't find the balance between being aggressive and not making mistakes. But I didn't give up. I kept fighting. Otherwise the match would have been finished very quickly." Murray did not get carried away with his performance. "Over the next few weeks, the more time I get to spend on the court practising and playing matches, that combined will help me play better. But the first match, you're just trying to win. You try to play solid. You don't take too many risks. It was good." Nadal, in his first game back on European soil since losing to Lukas Rosol at Wimbledon on collapsing knees nearly nine months ago, was at first awesome, relieved then his old, snorting self. He did not seem to favour the tender left knee that has plagued him much of his career, either, hitting a fierce rhythm in the closing moments. When Nadal passed Matosevic to wrap it up in just over an hour, the Australian for one glorious moment looked as if he were going to drill his spare ball straight back at the great man. He belted it high into the crowd, instead. You can tempt fate only so much. Andy Murray Rafael Nadal Tennis Kevin Mitchell guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds        

Vice All News Time17 April 2013 23:48:40