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UK to post 'strongest growth in G7'

21 July 2014 02:09:13 BBC News - UK

The UK economy will grow faster in 2014 than any other G7 economy, while low wage rises will keep interest rates at 0.5% until next year, an influential report says.

Vice All News Time21 July 2014 02:09:13


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Do Chelsea have the strongest U23 squad in the world?

16 July 2014 15:28:31 mirror - Sport

With Filipe Luís signing, Chelsea keep adding world-class players to their squad. But do they already have the strongest bunch of U23s in the world?

Vice Sport Time16 July 2014 15:28:31


Why Hang Seng is the world's strongest bank

16 June 2014 11:29:15 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

A look into the humble beginnings of one of the world's most powerful banks

Vice All News Time16 June 2014 11:29:15


France World Cup 2014 squad

06 June 2014 16:43:56 Sport

Full list of France's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Didier Deschamps names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time06 June 2014 16:43:56


Croatia World Cup 2014 squad

02 June 2014 11:56:13 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Croatia's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Niko Kovac names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time02 June 2014 11:56:13


Ghana World Cup 2014 squad

31 May 2014 20:17:26 Sport

Full list of Ghana's 26-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Akwasi Appiah names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time31 May 2014 20:17:26


Portugal World Cup 2014 squad

31 May 2014 20:17:25 Sport

Full list of Portugal's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Paulo Bento names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time31 May 2014 20:17:25


USA World Cup 2014 squad

31 May 2014 20:17:25 Sport

Full list of USA's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Jürgen Klinsmann names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time31 May 2014 20:17:25


Russia World Cup 2014 squad

31 May 2014 20:17:25 Sport

Full list of Belgium's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Marc Wilmots names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time31 May 2014 20:17:25


Belgium World Cup 2014 squad

31 May 2014 20:17:24 Sport

Full list of Belgium's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Marc Wilmots names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time31 May 2014 20:17:24


Chile World Cup 2014 squad

26 May 2014 15:10:45 Sport

Full list of Chile's 24-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Jorge Sampaoli names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time26 May 2014 15:10:45


House sales 'strongest since 2007'

21 May 2014 11:55:00 BBC News - UK

Northern Ireland house prices are rising, according to new figures covering the first months of 2014.

Vice All News Time21 May 2014 11:55:00


Iran World Cup 2014 squad

18 May 2014 00:25:52 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Iran's 28-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Carlos Quieroz names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time18 May 2014 00:25:52


Nigeria World Cup 2014 squad

18 May 2014 00:25:52 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Nigeria's 30-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Stephen Keshi names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time18 May 2014 00:25:52


Portugal World Cup 2014 squad

18 May 2014 00:25:52 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Portugal's 30-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Paulo Bento names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time18 May 2014 00:25:52


Ghana World Cup 2014 squad

18 May 2014 00:25:52 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Ghana's 26-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Akwasi Appiah names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time18 May 2014 00:25:52


Russia World Cup 2014 squad

18 May 2014 00:25:51 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Belgium's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Marc Wilmots names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time18 May 2014 00:25:51


Mexico World Cup 2014 squad

14 May 2014 23:00:24 Football - Fixtures, results, news, match reports, comment

Full list of Mexico's 23-man Fifa World Cup squad as head coach Miguel Herrera names his players for Brazil 2014

Vice All News Time14 May 2014 23:00:24


UK recovery 'will be the best in the world': Once-sceptical experts predict strongest growth in G7

10 January 2014 04:01:52 News | Mail Online

Output in the UK is forecast to grow by 3 per cent in 2014 and again in 2015 – making it the ‘leader of the pack’ among the leading Group of 7 nations.

Vice All News Time10 January 2014 04:01:52


Britain's recovery 'strongest in world'

13 November 2013 23:05:31 UK headlines

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney says that after years of weak growth, the economic recovery has "finally taken hold"        

Vice All News Time13 November 2013 23:05:31


Britain's recovery 'strongest in world'

13 November 2013 22:30:25 Finance News - Business news from the UK and world

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney says that after years of weak growth, the economic recovery has "finally taken hold"        

Vice Finance Time13 November 2013 22:30:25


Gillingham Adebayo Akinfenwa says he's officially the strongest player in the world

20 September 2013 12:21:44 Football | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Football Time20 September 2013 12:21:44


Gillingham Adebayo Akinfenwa says he's officially the strongest player in the world

20 September 2013 11:48:45 Sport | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 11:48:45


I'm officially the strongest player in the world and it's business as usual at Gillingham - Adebayo Akinfenwa

20 September 2013 02:39:48 Football | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Football Time20 September 2013 02:39:48


I'm officially the strongest player in the world and it's business as usual at Gillingham - Adebayo Akinfenwa

20 September 2013 02:37:55 Sport | Mail Online

In his latest fortnightly column, MailOnline Sport’s Adebayo Akinfenwa talks about officially being the strongest player in the world and why Gillingham are buzzing despite their winless start to the season.

Vice Sport Time20 September 2013 02:37:55


Uruguay struggle to get best out of Cavani-Suárez-Forlán triumvirate | Michael Cox

21 June 2013 14:20:27 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

The Uruguay coach, Oscar Tabárez, would like to play 4-4-1-1 at the Confederations Cup but has three of the world's best forwards at his disposal Following their impressive run to the World Cup semi-final in 2010, Uruguay's 3-0 victory over Paraguay in the Copa América final a year later confirmed their position as South America's strongest side – but anyone who watched only the highlights of that win would have an inaccurate impression of Oscar Tabárez's side. Uruguay won the Copa in style – as Paraguay pushed forward in the final minute, hoping for an unlikely comeback, Uruguay launched an exquisite, devastating quick counter-attack. Substitute Edinson Cavani found himself with the ball on the left flank, and hit a fantastic crossfield pass towards Luis Suárez. The Liverpool forward stooped to head the ball back into the path of Diego Forlán, who was rushing forward from a deep position – and he calmly rolled the ball into the far corner to clinch the trophy. Forlán, Suárez and Cavani is a forward triumvirate few other nations in the world can seriously rival – but that counter-attacking goal was an extremely rare example of successful link-up play between them. Tabárez has struggled to incorporate all three together – having drawn their first two matches of the 2011 Copa, Uruguay only started playing once Cavani was dropped. Tabárez instead stumbled upon a simple 4-4-1-1 system that boasted a tremendous relationship between Forlán and Suárez upfront. Forlán, now lacking pace and accustomed to a deeper role, linked midfield and attack while Suárez continually worked the channels as the primary forward, creating angles for through-balls and sprinting in behind. While Brendan Rodgers has experimented with Suárez in a deeper role recently, for Uruguay he's excelled when playing highest up the pitch – which has made it impossible for Tabárez to include Cavani in his favoured position, upfront. Over the past two years, Tabárez's has been a peculiar situation – Cavani and Suárez have stunning goalscoring records at club level, while Forlán's performances have dropped alarmingly, but the latter remains the best partner for the other two, able to link play selflessly as a No10. So desperate has Tabárez been to continue his 4-4-1-1 system, yet also feature Cavani in the side, that in last October's trip to Argentina for a World Cup qualifier, Cavani was featured on the left of a four-man midfield, spending the majority of the game tracking Pablo Zabaleta's darts up and down the touchline. It was a bizarre sight to see Serie A's most prolific goalscorer in such a defensive-minded role, and while Cavani said he was happy to help the side and Tabárez praised the Napoli forward's professionalism, his lack of impact and Argentina's comfortable 3-0 victory proved it was hardly a successful experiment. Uruguay's performances since the Copa América victory have been extremely underwhelming, and having previously been Conmebol's outstanding side, qualification for World Cup 2014 is now hanging in the balance. In Uruguay's defeat to Spain in their opening match of the Confederations Cup, Forlán was omitted as Suárez and Cavani both started. Uruguay were dreadful in the first half as Spain recorded possession statistics startling even by their standards, and Uruguay only improved once Forlán was introduced midway through the second half, prompting a much more positive performance and giving Spain a brief fright once Suárez curled in an excellent consolation goal from a free-kick. After Forlán's excellent substitute display, Tabárez reverted to the front three in the win against Nigeria – switching his team into a 3-4-3 shape in order to incorporate his three best players. For the first time since the Copa two years ago, the trio combined successfully for a goal – Suárez knocked the ball inside to Cavani, who transferred it to the left flank for Forlán's stunning left-footed finish inside the near post on his 100th cap, which turned out to be the winning goal. Again, however, this wasn't an accurate reflection of their collective performance – Tabárez knows he wants to play all three, but doesn't have a clue about their best format. Traditionally he preferred Forlán deep and central, with Suárez left and Cavani right. Against Nigeria, he used Forlán wide left with Cavani starting up front and Suárez right, and then switched the latter two for the second half, when things weren't working. Cavani missed a couple of fine chances, while Suárez was often on the periphery. Furthermore, using three forwards creates significant problems in deeper positions. Neither Suárez nor Cavani were remotely interested in tracking back when fielded on the right flank, which meant Maxi Pereira was frequently overloaded, forced to deal with the astonishing pace of Ahmed Musa and the constant bursts of left-back Elderson Echiéjilé. Tabárez eventually switched his system from 3-4-3 to 4-3-3 at 1-0 up, which seemed to contain the problem on that flank, but ended Uruguay's spell of dominance and invited Nigeria back into the game. That was a microcosm of Uruguay's situation – they had one moment of great combination play from their forward trio, but in order to include them together, the rest of the side suffered. There's little doubt the trio will all start in Sunday's match against Tahiti, but Tabárez is no closer to formulating his best starting XI. Michael Cox is the editor of tactics website zonalmarking.net Confederations Cup Uruguay Luis Suárez Michael Cox guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds    

Vice All News Time21 June 2013 14:20:27


Uruguay struggle to get best out of Cavani-Suárez-Forlán triumvirate | Michael Cox

21 June 2013 14:15:04 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

The Uruguay coach, Oscar Tabárez, would like to play 4-4-1-1 at the Confederations Cup but has three of the world's best forwards at his disposal Following their impressive run to the World Cup semi-final in 2010, Uruguay's 3-0 victory over Paraguay in the Copa América final a year later confirmed their position as South America's strongest side – but anyone who watched only the highlights of that win would have an inaccurate impression of Oscar Tabárez's side. Uruguay won the Copa in style – as Paraguay pushed forward in the final minute, hoping for an unlikely comeback, Uruguay launched an exquisite, devastating quick counter-attack. Substitute Edinson Cavani found himself with the ball on the left flank, and hit a fantastic crossfield pass towards Luis Suárez. The Liverpool forward stooped to head the ball back into the path of Diego Forlán, who was rushing forward from a deep position – and he calmly rolled the ball into the far corner to clinch the trophy. Forlán, Suárez and Cavani is a forward triumvirate few other nations in the world can seriously rival – but that counter-attacking goal was an extremely rare example of successful link-up play between them. Tabárez has struggled to incorporate all three together – having drawn their first two matches of the 2011 Copa, Uruguay only started playing once Cavani was dropped. Tabárez instead stumbled upon a simple 4-4-1-1 system that boasted a tremendous relationship between Forlán and Suárez upfront. Forlán, now lacking pace and accustomed to a deeper role, linked midfield and attack while Suárez continually worked the channels as the primary forward, creating angles for through-balls and sprinting in behind. While Brendan Rodgers has experimented with Suárez in a deeper role recently, for Uruguay he's excelled when playing highest up the pitch – which has made it impossible for Tabárez to include Cavani in his favoured position, upfront. Over the past two years, Tabárez's has been a peculiar situation – Cavani and Suárez have stunning goalscoring records at club level, while Forlán's performances have dropped alarmingly, but the latter remains the best partner for the other two, able to link play selflessly as a No10. So desperate has Tabárez been to continue his 4-4-1-1 system, yet also feature Cavani in the side, that in last October's trip to Argentina for a World Cup qualifier, Cavani was featured on the left of a four-man midfield, spending the majority of the game tracking Pablo Zabaleta's darts up and down the touchline. It was a bizarre sight to see Serie A's most prolific goalscorer in such a defensive-minded role, and while Cavani said he was happy to help the side and Tabárez praised the Napoli forward's professionalism, his lack of impact and Argentina's comfortable 3-0 victory proved it was hardly a successful experiment. Uruguay's performances since the Copa América victory have been extremely underwhelming, and having previously been Conmebol's outstanding side, qualification for World Cup 2014 is now hanging in the balance. In Uruguay's defeat to Spain in their opening match of the Confederations Cup, Forlán was omitted as Suárez and Cavani both started. Uruguay were dreadful in the first half as Spain recorded possession statistics startling even by their standards, and Uruguay only improved once Forlán was introduced midway through the second half, prompting a much more positive performance and giving Spain a brief fright once Suárez curled in an excellent consolation goal from a free-kick. After Forlán's excellent substitute display, Tabárez reverted to the front three in the win against Nigeria – switching his team into a 3-4-3 shape in order to incorporate his three best players. For the first time since the Copa two years ago, the trio combined successfully for a goal – Suárez knocked the ball inside to Cavani, who transferred it to the left flank for Forlán's stunning left-footed finish inside the near post on his 100th cap, which turned out to be the winning goal. Again, however, this wasn't an accurate reflection of their collective performance – Tabárez knows he wants to play all three, but doesn't have a clue about their best format. Traditionally he preferred Forlán deep and central, with Suárez left and Cavani right. Against Nigeria, he used Forlán wide left with Cavani starting up front and Suárez right, and then switched the latter two for the second half, when things weren't working. Cavani missed a couple of fine chances, while Suárez was often on the periphery. Furthermore, using three forwards creates significant problems in deeper positions. Neither Suárez nor Cavani were remotely interested in tracking back when fielded on the right flank, which meant Maxi Pereira was frequently overloaded, forced to deal with the astonishing pace of Ahmed Musa and the constant bursts of left-back Elderson Echiéjilé. Tabárez eventually switched his system from 3-4-3 to 4-3-3 at 1-0 up, which seemed to contain the problem on that flank, but ended Uruguay's spell of dominance and invited Nigeria back into the game. That was a microcosm of Uruguay's situation – they had one moment of great combination play from their forward trio, but in order to include them together, the rest of the side suffered. There's little doubt the trio will all start in Sunday's match against Tahiti, but Tabárez is no closer to formulating his best starting XI. Michael Cox is the editor of tactics website zonalmarking.net Confederations Cup Uruguay Luis Suárez Michael Cox guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds    

Vice All News Time21 June 2013 14:15:04


USA vs Panama: Five things we learned in the World Cup qualifier

12 June 2013 17:40:14 Football news, match reports and fixtures | theguardian.com

Jozy Altidore's scoring streak; Geoff Cameron shows his versatility; Seattle a successful venue after long wait for USMNT action Altidore knows more than one route to goal Before the US took the lead against Panama on a beautiful flowing goal that ended with Jozy Altidore sliding in at the back post to finish Fabian Johnson's inch perfect cross between the defense and the goalkeeper, the US had briefly looked as if they might struggle for goals. Eddie Johnson, in for Zusi, is not a like for like replacement, and his crosses, and in general the long balls the US tried to send up for Altidore, were asking even this powerful forward to do too much against the equally strong Panamian center backs of Baloy and Torres. And while Altidore had a decent penalty shout when he turned and ran for goal a moment before opening the scoring, in general what we saw in Seattle was not so much him powering his way to goal, but picking out his route. The abiding memory of Altidore's performance was the deftness of his hold up play - repeatedly receiving the ball and instantly changing the angle of attack, or as in his late game set up for Beasley (that was a post's width away from being one of the great US goals) just having great 360 degree awareness and opening up space — at times playing deep in the space you might expect Dempsey to pop up. And of course scoring in three consecutive international games for the first time means he can not only do these things, he currently has an abundant belief in his ability to do those things. He'll need that memory in tougher times ahead, but for now he's added another dimension to this US attack. Dempsey makes a great ghost We knew he made a great troll, but this was one of those Dempsey performances where his qualities were evident in relief. Clearly Panama thought he was the US danger man, to the point where they were prepared to risk the space opened up by Baloy tracking Dempsey everywhere he went. Dempsey duly went everywhere, and in doing so created all sorts of space for the men around him. The US could have opened the scoring when the late-arriving Bradley (another potent weapon) had way too much space on the edge of the box to strike a low shot on goal. The space had been created by one Clint Dempsey, who ironically blocked the shot in the advanced position he'd moved to. As it was the opening goal also owed much to Dempsey's movement as he drew runners to the near post and out of the play, just as Johnson's whipped in cross came on. The beneficiary of this space was the unmarked Altidore, who scored at the back post. The idea that Altidore might be unmarked at any point is beginning to look a crazy proposition, on recent form — but with Dempsey on the field something can happen at any moment. Panama opted to stifle that threat, but Deuce still haunted them Geoff Cameron is no misfit He was the club midfielder who was converted to a center back who was played at right back, and then couldn't get a look in at any of those positions as Klinsmann's team came together, but in Seattle Geoff Cameron went back to his roots and played alongside Michael Bradley in center midfield. The Stoke City player had a very strong game, even without taking into account his through ball to Eddie Johnson for the second goal, where he received the ball near the center circle, looked up and released a great ball into space for the Seattle striker. His support play was well-judged and his tackling was tenacious. Perhaps the true marker of Cameron's influence was the position of Bradley. When Bradley plays he's the center of balance for the team. He sets the tempo and links up myriad triangles of passes to and from the players around him. With Cameron cleaning up, that center of balance was pushed higher up the field, meaning Bradley was a significant late-arriving threat into the box, as Altidore and Dempsey made all sorts of space and trouble in front of them. It's unfortunate for Jermaine Jones that he had to miss out, as he has finally begun to look like the player Klinsmann hoped he might be, instead of a yellow card machine, but for a coach half way through the Hex and daring to look to Brazil, he'll be relieved to know that one potential squad member was able to show his versatility The backs might be the future With the exception of the veteran Beasley (whose 103rd cap on the night surpassed Kasey Keller) this is a very inexperienced US back line at international level — something both Jamaica and Panama tried to exploit in their relentless targeting of Brad Evans on the right. Quintero was Evans' would be tormenter in Seattle — the Panamanian forward repeatedly running at the non-specialty full back to try and create an opening. But while he had some success, two of the strongest images of this subplot were Omar Gonzalez stepping across to block Quintero as he looked to have beaten Evans, and in another move where Quintero had got to the byline, Matt Besler stepping forward calmly to intercept a cutback intended for Tejada. The central pairing has grown in confidence as Klinsmann has in turn extended confidence to them. Gonzalez still seems vulnerable to late lapses in concentration and he was caught ball-watching by Blackburn in injury time, forcing Howard to be out sharply to make a block from the substitute. But he and Besler are complementing each other well, and Evans (whose goal in Jamaica may prove to be one of the defining moments of the campaign — along with Altidore's in the same game) accepted his role as a likely opposition target and stuck to his task, even as the attacking tendencies of Zusi and then Eddie Johnson left him very exposed at times on that flank. Evans is slowly winning round the doubters. It's unlikely that the steady drip of emails I get during every liveblog , asking for Lichaj to be played, are going to stop soon (Lichaj, like Gonzalez during his injury last year, may find himself in the unenviable position of becoming a better player in the minds of many, the more he doesn't play). But for now Evans and the defenders alongside him are passing the tests put in front of them. The margin of those passing grades matters less than the two point margin of the US lead at the top of the Hex. Seattle was a success There was a moment in the second half where a wild Sanchez shot looked to be going out for a throw, only to apparently catch one of the controversial grass seams and stay in play near the corner flag. Perhaps had the game gone differently this would have been the image seized on as emblematic of a poor decision to attempt to harness the power of soccer's appeal in Seattle. As it was, it was a humorous curio in a game the US were leading 2-0 in front of a large and ecstatic crowd, who'd moments earlier erupted as the hometown team's Eddie Johnson curled a sweet finish beyond the keeper for the second USA goal. There were issues — the problems with the surface in particular is not going to go away. Players did slip at moments and it was cutting up, though it didn't look to unduly affect key moments of the game. And US Soccer's continued high ticket pricing for these games was as

Vice All News Time12 June 2013 17:40:14


USA vs Panama: Five things we learned in the World Cup qualifier

12 June 2013 17:40:12 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

Jozy Altidore's scoring streak; Geoff Cameron shows his versatility; Seattle a successful venue after long wait for USMNT action Altidore knows more than one route to goal Before the US took the lead against Panama on a beautiful flowing goal that ended with Jozy Altidore sliding in at the back post to finish Fabian Johnson's inch perfect cross between the defense and the goalkeeper, the US had briefly looked as if they might struggle for goals. Eddie Johnson, in for Zusi, is not a like for like replacement, and his crosses, and in general the long balls the US tried to send up for Altidore, were asking even this powerful forward to do too much against the equally strong Panamian center backs of Baloy and Torres. And while Altidore had a decent penalty shout when he turned and ran for goal a moment before opening the scoring, in general what we saw in Seattle was not so much him powering his way to goal, but picking out his route. The abiding memory of Altidore's performance was the deftness of his hold up play - repeatedly receiving the ball and instantly changing the angle of attack, or as in his late game set up for Beasley (that was a post's width away from being one of the great US goals) just having great 360 degree awareness and opening up space — at times playing deep in the space you might expect Dempsey to pop up. And of course scoring in three consecutive international games for the first time means he can not only do these things, he currently has an abundant belief in his ability to do those things. He'll need that memory in tougher times ahead, but for now he's added another dimension to this US attack. Dempsey makes a great ghost We knew he made a great troll, but this was one of those Dempsey performances where his qualities were evident in relief. Clearly Panama thought he was the US danger man, to the point where they were prepared to risk the space opened up by Baloy tracking Dempsey everywhere he went. Dempsey duly went everywhere, and in doing so created all sorts of space for the men around him. The US could have opened the scoring when the late-arriving Bradley (another potent weapon) had way too much space on the edge of the box to strike a low shot on goal. The space had been created by one Clint Dempsey, who ironically blocked the shot in the advanced position he'd moved to. As it was the opening goal also owed much to Dempsey's movement as he drew runners to the near post and out of the play, just as Johnson's whipped in cross came on. The beneficiary of this space was the unmarked Altidore, who scored at the back post. The idea that Altidore might be unmarked at any point is beginning to look a crazy proposition, on recent form — but with Dempsey on the field something can happen at any moment. Panama opted to stifle that threat, but Deuce still haunted them Geoff Cameron is no misfit He was the club midfielder who was converted to a center back who was played at right back, and then couldn't get a look in at any of those positions as Klinsmann's team came together, but in Seattle Geoff Cameron went back to his roots and played alongside Michael Bradley in center midfield. The Stoke City player had a very strong game, even without taking into account his through ball to Eddie Johnson for the second goal, where he received the ball near the center circle, looked up and released a great ball into space for the Seattle striker. His support play was well-judged and his tackling was tenacious. Perhaps the true marker of Cameron's influence was the position of Bradley. When Bradley plays he's the center of balance for the team. He sets the tempo and links up myriad triangles of passes to and from the players around him. With Cameron cleaning up, that center of balance was pushed higher up the field, meaning Bradley was a significant late-arriving threat into the box, as Altidore and Dempsey made all sorts of space and trouble in front of them. It's unfortunate for Jermaine Jones that he had to miss out, as he has finally begun to look like the player Klinsmann hoped he might be, instead of a yellow card machine, but for a coach half way through the Hex and daring to look to Brazil, he'll be relieved to know that one potential squad member was able to show his versatility The backs might be the future With the exception of the veteran Beasley (whose 103rd cap on the night surpassed Kasey Keller) this is a very inexperienced US back line at international level — something both Jamaica and Panama tried to exploit in their relentless targeting of Brad Evans on the right. Quintero was Evans' would be tormenter in Seattle — the Panamanian forward repeatedly running at the non-specialty full back to try and create an opening. But while he had some success, two of the strongest images of this subplot were Omar Gonzalez stepping across to block Quintero as he looked to have beaten Evans, and in another move where Quintero had got to the byline, Matt Besler stepping forward calmly to intercept a cutback intended for Tejada. The central pairing has grown in confidence as Klinsmann has in turn extended confidence to them. Gonzalez still seems vulnerable to late lapses in concentration and he was caught ball-watching by Blackburn in injury time, forcing Howard to be out sharply to make a block from the substitute. But he and Besler are complementing each other well, and Evans (whose goal in Jamaica may prove to be one of the defining moments of the campaign — along with Altidore's in the same game) accepted his role as a likely opposition target and stuck to his task, even as the attacking tendencies of Zusi and then Eddie Johnson left him very exposed at times on that flank. Evans is slowly winning round the doubters. It's unlikely that the steady drip of emails I get during every liveblog , asking for Lichaj to be played, are going to stop soon (Lichaj, like Gonzalez during his injury last year, may find himself in the unenviable position of becoming a better player in the minds of many, the more he doesn't play). But for now Evans and the defenders alongside him are passing the tests put in front of them. The margin of those passing grades matters less than the two point margin of the US lead at the top of the Hex. Seattle was a success There was a moment in the second half where a wild Sanchez shot looked to be going out for a throw, only to apparently catch one of the controversial grass seams and stay in play near the corner flag. Perhaps had the game gone differently this would have been the image seized on as emblematic of a poor decision to attempt to harness the power of soccer's appeal in Seattle. As it was, it was a humorous curio in a game the US were leading 2-0 in front of a large and ecstatic crowd, who'd moments earlier erupted as the hometown team's Eddie Johnson curled a sweet finish beyond the keeper for the second USA goal. There were issues — the problems with the surface in particular is not going to go away. Players did slip at moments and it was cutting up, though it didn't look to unduly affect key moments of the game. And US Soccer's continued high ticket pricing for these games was as

Vice All News Time12 June 2013 17:40:12


The Gruppetto: 24 hours at the Giro d'Italia

09 May 2013 00:27:47 Sport news, comment and results | theguardian.com

John Degenkolb reigns after chaos in the peloton | Columbian conspiracy debunked | Salad days for Greek cycling Welcome to the latest edition of the Gruppetto, your daily blogpost on the Giro d'Italia. We'll be posting every day, reflecting on the previous stage and looking ahead. Do get involved below the line, or email me at james.callow@guardian.co.uk Yesterday once more A victory for Argos-Shimano's John Degenkolb and the most dramatic crash of the race so far. As predicted the peloton progressed serenely until the first of two climbs. Mark Cavendish was shelled on the second, and a select peloton formed in Matera for what had already begun to look like a disorganised bunch sprint. Argos-Shimano's train looked promising as they battled for position going to the final corner, only for Luca Mezgec, Degenkolb's main leadout man, to crash. The Slovenian blocked most of the peloton and forced several others to slip, leaving Valvole Bardiani-CSF Inox's Marco Canola in the clear with under 1km remaining. But Degenkolb recovered well to reel in Canola with a sprint that must have felt like a time trial. Degenkolb said: "I went full gas to the finish to catch the Bardiani rider. In the end I couldn't see, I was so empty. I had to suffer a lot to get to the finish today." Sir Bradley Wiggins and the Maglia Rosa Luca Paolini both emerged unscathed and without losing time, trapped behind the crash but credited with the same time as Degenkolb. Good day Argos-Shimano This is the Dutch team's first season with a World Tour licence, and they could make a decent case for being the strongest sprinters' team since HTC-Highroad folded at the end of 2011. They may not have a Cavendish or an André Greipel but in Degenkolb and Marcel Kittel they have genuine contenders for any bunch sprint and an ability to form a leadout train envied by anyone bar Lotto-Belisol. And talking of envy, what about Degenkolb's blond moustache-white lycra combo? Or indeed his lucky pyjamas? Bad day Pablo Urtasun The Basque withdrew before the start of stage five after crashing on the opening day. He had ridden nearly 500km since sustaining cuts to his knee, hip and elbow and felt he could contribute no more. The Euskadi-Euskaltel rider said: "I feel devastated. It's a shame to prepare for the Giro with such dedication and then have such bad luck. All that work and sacrifice will go unseen and wasted. From experience I know I will be sore for a further eight or nine days." Musings on big pink • Bizarre conspiracy theory The Gruppetto is all ears when it comes to tall tales, but then it remembers its journalism training and returns to propriety. Tuesday's notion of a Columbian conspiracy at Team Sky between Sergio Henao and Rigoberto Urán briefly won airtime, after the talented pairing raced on to the finish on stage four despite their leader Wiggins being trapped behind the crash. Sky usually have an explanation for everything – a policy sometimes known as the 'Hand of Fran' – but the head coach Rod Ellingworth's explanation that the Columbians were sent off in pursuit of top-three time bonuses rang true. Indeed Henao had the same plan on stage five, finishing fourth, and really should have contested the sprint on stage three, where Cadel Evans and Ryder Hesjedal were allowed to snaffle time bonuses . That should be the end of it, but like the Wiggins v Chris Froome franchise , good logic rarely stands in the way of a story with legs. Urán, Cycling News says , is expected to leave Sky at the end of the season, partly because his points ranking makes him a viable leader for a team looking to win a 2014 franchise , and also because with Froome, Wiggins and Richie Porte around, the brilliant 26-year-old's opportunities to lead a grand tour are slim. And Urán's leading suitor? Wiggins's rival Vincenzo Nibali's Astana team … cue more silliness. The best advice is to expect Urán to be back alongside Wiggins for the remainder of the Giro, and stop asking yourself why precisely Lars Petter Nordhaug and Vasil Kiryienka worked so hard for Team GB in Men's Road Race at London 2012. That would be Nordhaug, who spent three years at Sky, and Kiryienka, who joined Sir Dave Brailsford's team (Sky, not GB) last winter. • Black, white and red all over For whoever had the bright idea of laying a coat of fresh paint on the zebra crossing at the final corner of stage five in Matera, causing carnage in the peloton and a heavy fall for Argos-Shimano's Luca Mezgec. According to Fodor's guide, "Matera is the only place in the world where people can boast to be still living in the same houses of their ancestors of 9,000 years ago ". So locals are living in (very pretty) caves, but at least the road markings are clear. • Salad days for Greek cycling The word cycle comes from the Greek word kyklos , although it is usually used to describe a government's term rather than a two-wheeled activity. But consider this: there have been 261 grand tours, involving tens of thousands of riders from all over the world. Yet until this year's Giro, not one of them has been Greek. In 110 years why has no one had the same inclination as Euskaltel-Euskadi's Ioannis Tamouridis? Today's racing The 169km stage six between Mola di Bari and Margherita Di Savoia is a blast along flat coastal roads and a sure-thing for the sprinters. Expect a phoney war in the opening kilometres as lesser teams vie to get a rider in a breakaway, and give their sponsors a bit of television time. The serious racing will only pick up when the peloton gets back together, and sprinters' teams start to form their trains. The race passes through the finishing line once before embarking on a 40km rectangular circuit. Expect winds to be a factor – a 13mph headwind is not inconsiderable when you factor in the speed of the riders. Bookies' favourites Three reasons why Cavendish, who is best-priced at 13-20 with bet.365.com , will win stage 6: 1 In the absence of Greipel, Cavendish is by some distance the fastest sprinter in the race 2 With so few opportunities for sprinters in this Giro

Vice All News Time09 May 2013 00:27:47